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Article

Misty M. Bennett, Terry A. Beehr and Lana V. Ivanitskaya

The purpose of this paper is to examine work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict, taking into account generational cohort and life cycle stage differences.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict, taking into account generational cohort and life cycle stage differences.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey participants (428 employed individuals with families) represented different generations and life cycles. Key variables were work/family characteristics and centrality, work-family and family-work conflict, and age.

Findings

Generational differences in both directions were found. Gen X-ers reported the most work-family conflict, followed by Millennials and then Baby Boomers. Baby Boomers exhibited family-work conflict the most, followed by Gen X-ers, and then Millennials, a surprising finding given generational stereotypes. Some of these differences remained after controlling for children in the household (based on life cycle stage theory) and age. Millennials were highest in work centrality, whereas Baby Boomers were highest in family centrality. Employees with children ages 13-18 reported the most work-family conflict, and employees with children under the age of six reported the most family-work conflict.

Research limitations/implications

This study found that generation and children in the household make a difference in work-family conflict, but it did not support some of the common generational stereotypes. Future studies should use a time-lag technique to study generational differences. To reduce work-family conflict, it is important to consider its directionality, which varies across generations and life cycle stages.

Practical implications

This informs organizations on how to tailor interventions to help employees balance work/life demands.

Originality/value

This study is the first to simultaneously examine both generation and life cycle stage (children in the household) in regard to work-family conflict.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Verne Wheelwright

Futures research is commonly reported on the macro scale, and involves analysis of a global or national situation with a long‐range view of trends and alternative futures…

Abstract

Futures research is commonly reported on the macro scale, and involves analysis of a global or national situation with a long‐range view of trends and alternative futures. This article approaches ageing and the future from the micro scale, examining the future one life at a time; suggesting that futures methodology can, and should, be effectively applied to individual lives. Three propositions relating to development of personal futures are introduced, focusing on life stages, personal trends and life events after age 60. These three elements of life are then shown as a framework on which individuals can build personal scenarios and create personal strategic plans for the stages of life after age 60.

Details

Foresight, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article

Darush Yazdanfar and Peter Öhman

This study aims to empirically examine the applicability of the life cycle model of firm performance to growth and profitability among Swedish small- and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically examine the applicability of the life cycle model of firm performance to growth and profitability among Swedish small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using analysis of variance, multiple analysis of variance and three-stage least square modelling, this study analyses a longitudinal data set covering 26,721 Swedish SMEs in six industries from 2008 to 2011.

Findings

The empirical results indicate a clear life cycle performance pattern among the sampled SMEs, and that a six-stage life cycle model is applicable in predicting the performance pattern in terms of growth and profitability. On average, younger SMEs tend to display better performance in terms of growth and profitability than do their older and larger counterparts; moreover, larger SMEs tend to achieve better performance than do smaller ones.

Practical implications

The findings help SME managers understand how their decision-making style, strategy and structure can be related to various life cycle stages. Such an understanding may help them improve firm performance over time. Policymakers may find the results useful in coordinating SME support in line with various life cycle stages.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this study is one of only a few using two performance variables to test the applicability of the life cycle model in a longitudinal and cross-industrial sample.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article

Asta Pundziene, Virginijus Kundrotas and Zigmas Lydeka

The paper aims first of all to identify the stage of the life cycle of rapidly growing Lithuanian enterprises and the main challenges that management faces at a particular stage.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims first of all to identify the stage of the life cycle of rapidly growing Lithuanian enterprises and the main challenges that management faces at a particular stage.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of the study is based on the research works carried out by Hanks and Watson, Miller and Friesen and Kazanjian. On the basis of the selected factors an original questionnaire was developed and administered to eight Lithuanian companies.

Findings

Main findings of the empirical study show that rapidly growing Lithuanian companies correspond to the main life cycle features and face specific problems that were partially reported by numerous research works but also some unique ones. Findings confirm the reliability of the life cycle studies.

Research limitations/implications

The research could be extended to the broader sample, especially into different sectors. Also it would be beneficial to carry out the study in different countries with developing economies to test unique findings of the research.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by managers to predict and prepare for meeting effectively the challenges associated with certain stages of enterprise growth.

Originality/value

The paper is a first attempt to apply organisational life cycle theory in order to systemise the challenges that Lithuanian enterprises face, and to contribute to the development of the debate on organisational life cycle theory reliability.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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Article

Donald L. Lester and John A. Parnell

This paper aims to present the results of an exploratory study of the organizational life cycle. Rather than approaching the construct from a small‐ or large‐ firm…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the results of an exploratory study of the organizational life cycle. Rather than approaching the construct from a small‐ or large‐ firm perspective, a model appropriate for all organizations is employed.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to 107 practicing managers to determine life cycle stage of their organizations and environmental scanning pursuits.

Findings

The study revealed that small firms are not only found in the first two life cycle stages – existence and survival – but also in the decline stage. In addition, support was not found for environmental scanning patterns previously postulated in the literature.

Practical implications

Managers of SMEs who wish to grow their organizations must understand the Gestalt changes necessary for successful progression to a large organization.

Originality/value

One life cycle model is appropriate for all organizations and can be utilized as a transition guide for strategic managers who recognize that their decisions are the real determinants of life cycle stage.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Book part

Haiyan Zhou, Hanwen Chen and Zhirong Cheng

In this paper, we investigate whether internal control and whether corporate life cycle would affect firm performance in the emerging markets of China.

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, we investigate whether internal control and whether corporate life cycle would affect firm performance in the emerging markets of China.

Methodology/approach

We use Chen, Dong, Han, and Zhou’s (2013) internal control index on the effectiveness of internal control and Dickinson’s (2011) definition on firm life cycle. We use multivariate regression analysis.

Findings

We find that the internal control improves corporate performance. When dividing firm life cycle into five stages: introduction, growth, mature, shake-out and decline, we find that the impacts of internal control on firm performance vary with different stages. The positive impact of internal control on firm performance is more significant in maturity and shake-out stages than other stages.

Research limitations/implications

Our findings would have implications for the regulators and policy makers with regards to the importance of internal control in corporate governance and the effectiveness of implementing standards and guidelines on internal control in public firms.

Practical implications

In addition, our findings on the various roles of internal control at different stages of firm life cycle would help managers and board of directors find more focus in risk management and board monitoring, respectively.

Originality/value

Although the prior literature have examined the link between internal control, information quality and cost of equity capital (Ashbaugh-Skaife, Collins, Kinney, & LaFond, 2009; Ogneva, Subramanyam, & Raghunandan, 2007), our study would be the first attempt to investigate the link between internal control and firm performance during different stages of firm life cycles.

Details

The Political Economy of Chinese Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-957-2

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Book part

Petri Suomala

The essential investments in new product development (NPD) made by industrial companies entail effective management of NPD activities. In this context, performance…

Abstract

The essential investments in new product development (NPD) made by industrial companies entail effective management of NPD activities. In this context, performance measurement is one of the means that can be employed in the pursuit of effectiveness.

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Article

A. Meenaghan and Peter W. Turnbull

Reviews product life cycle theory and examines empirical evidence. Reports on empirical research carried out to determine the applicability of the theory to popular record…

Abstract

Reviews product life cycle theory and examines empirical evidence. Reports on empirical research carried out to determine the applicability of the theory to popular record products. Proposes a framework of the relationship between the producer life cycle and the marketing mix.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article

Jernej Belak

The behaviour of an enterprise (including ethical behaviour) strongly depends on the organization’s culture, values and beliefs. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The behaviour of an enterprise (including ethical behaviour) strongly depends on the organization’s culture, values and beliefs. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that organizational culture differs according to enterprise life cycle stage. Also the importance of the knowledge and awareness of these differences to enterprises’ management in order to be able to ensure enterprises’ success is argued.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study research methodology was applied to explore the differences in the type of organizational culture as well as cultural strength depending on the enterprise’s life cycle stage. For the empirical testing, the author have selected Slovenia, one of the most developed European post-socialist transition countries.

Findings

The research revealed differences in the types and strengths of enterprises’ organizational cultures and showed their dependence on the enterprises’ life cycle stages.

Practical implications

Knowledge of differences in organizational culture in relation to an enterprise’s life cycle stage can significantly contribute to the behaviour of the enterprise’s key stakeholders by ensuring the long-term and sustainable success of the enterprise.

Originality/value

The available literature does not provide similar research of differences in organizational culture in relation to an enterprise’s life cycle stages.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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