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Article

Elizabeth Walker and Nicola Jones

Butchers Licensing Regulations have been in force for two years. They require premises which handle unwrapped raw meat and sell raw meat alongside ready to eat foods to…

Abstract

Butchers Licensing Regulations have been in force for two years. They require premises which handle unwrapped raw meat and sell raw meat alongside ready to eat foods to operate fully documented food safety management systems. These management systems are in keeping with the seven principles of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) as detailed by the Codex and are aimed at ensuring food safety and at improving consumer protection. This article focuses on the initial first year work undertaken by Derby City Council to get its 29 butcher’s shops successfully licensed. Data collated and evaluated is presented which gives a clear picture of standards in premises before and after licensing. Standards in the majority of the premises significantly improved and butchers attitudes in general appear to be more positive towards food safety. However substantial costs have been associated with licensing. There are important implications from these costs if the government is to consider licensing the rest of the UK food businesses.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

David Morgan

Briefly outlines the history of the valuation and appraisal oflicensed premises since the 1950s and discusses how the system hasevolved through the course of years in line…

Abstract

Briefly outlines the history of the valuation and appraisal of licensed premises since the 1950s and discusses how the system has evolved through the course of years in line with market trends. Analyses the resultant changes in the methods of appraisal in respect of the public house and details the several constituents of standard such appraisal. Suggests that the traditional methodology for this type of property is no longer appropriate in today′s marketplace.

Details

Journal of Valuation, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7480

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Article

Andrew Newton

This paper will reflect on the impact of the Licensing Act 2003 (LA03). It will focus primarily on how the LA03 has been introduced to, and has influenced, the night‐time…

Abstract

This paper will reflect on the impact of the Licensing Act 2003 (LA03). It will focus primarily on how the LA03 has been introduced to, and has influenced, the night‐time economy (NTE). More specifically, it will examine the impact of the LA03 on alcohol‐related crime, disorder and harm to health, within an urban context. It will review the evidence base for the impact of the LA03, suggesting reasons why the UK experience of extended trading hours is not consistent with international evidence. It will examine the mixed findings from evaluations as to its success/failures/limited influence, and discuss its impact on a number of organisations involved in the promotion and safety of the NTE. It will highlight the continued struggles encountered within the NTE, between the promotion of an enjoyable and profitable NTE, and those who have responsibility for maintaining a safe NTE environment. It will also discuss potential extraneous factors that have superseded the LA03, before concluding by offering and discussing some possible avenues for future direction.

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Safer Communities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article

Matthew J. Alexander, Euan Beveridge, Andrew C. MacLaren and Kevin D. O'Gorman

The purpose of this paper is to explore the reaction of customer facing staff and their attitude to the introduction of high profile corporate social responsibility (CSR…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the reaction of customer facing staff and their attitude to the introduction of high profile corporate social responsibility (CSR) programmes; in particular their level of awareness and willingness to implement them.

Design/methodology/approach

Conducted using a series of site visits and interviews with managers working within the licensed trade, this was followed up with structured interviews of “front line” staff.

Findings

Despite high levels of awareness of both the social problems relating to alcohol consumption and the legislative changes, engagement with operational CSR was limited and often disinterested. Legal and societal expectations regarding drunkenness are of little concern.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is concerned with nascent legislation, the full impact and success of which has not yet emerged. Reviewing this study in five years would add to the strength of the results. Limited to Scotland due to its devolved licensing laws, however, it clearly highlights lack of employee engagement with CSR.

Practical implications

Despite placing CSR issues at the forefront of day to day operations within the licensed trade there is little empirical evidence around customer facing staff engagement. CSR is a dynamic process that relies on the involvement of employees for its successful implementation.

Originality/value

A new CSR implementation matrix is presented which allows hospitality businesses to be positioned according to levels of both management and employee engagement with CSR policies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article

Rick Brown and Emily Evans

This study examines changes to the night‐time economy of Hartlepool in the north east of England following the introduction of the Licensing Act 2003. It shows that later…

Abstract

This study examines changes to the night‐time economy of Hartlepool in the north east of England following the introduction of the Licensing Act 2003. It shows that later opening hours led to later drinking, which in turn led to later violence, criminal damage and antisocial behaviour. Over the period examined, violence against the person fell by 14% in the town centre between the hours of 8pm and 4.59am, while criminal damage fell by 15% and antisocial behaviour increased by 4%. Extending the licensing hours would appear to have contributed to a more moderate (4%) reduction in violence against the person, resulting from a reduction in violence between midnight and 1.59am (the previous closing time) and a smaller increase between 2am and 4.59am. Using the same approach, criminal damage and antisocial behaviour saw small net increases over the same period. Both licensees and partner agencies perceived that changes were detrimental to the town centre. Existing powers at the time of the research appeared to be insufficient to address these problems, which affected the whole of the night‐time economy area rather than individual premises. However, new proposals for extended early morning restriction orders would allow local authorities to revert to the opening hours in place prior to the Licensing Act 2003.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article

Howard Day and Rupert Kelton

The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and methodology applied to the rental valuation of wet led (i.e. pub or bar) retail leisure outlets. The paper does…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and methodology applied to the rental valuation of wet led (i.e. pub or bar) retail leisure outlets. The paper does not cover the valuation of other leisure property (e.g. restaurants, hotels).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opens with a brief outline of the factors and legislative changes which have shaped the public house market over the past 15 years. This is followed by a explanation of the rental valuation methods in use in the pub and bar sector and examination of the impact of some current issues – in particular the impact of the full implementation of the Licensing Act 2003 along with other legislative and regulatory changes. Finally the paper comments on some of the issues relevant to freehold investment purchases of public houses and bars.

Findings

As a consequence of the nature of the industry, profits based valuations continue to dominate the market and this raises difficult questions of method and interpretation particularly, as the market is further complicated by legislative and regulatory changes introducing greater uncertainty. With regard to public house and bar freehold investment changes in the structure of the market have had a significant impact on perceptions of the investment quality of the leisure sector with consequences both for flows of capital and the structure of yields in the market place.

Practical implications

Valuers need to be aware that freehold investment values in this sector have potentially peaked and that investment decisions in the sector should be based upon sustainable rent.

Originality/value

The paper is of use to all valuers in this niche market and provides a practical understanding of the profits test method of valuation from which a sustainable rent may be derived.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article

B.J. Gillham

The licensed property marked has never been busier. However, it is not one market but several. There is a drive by operators of the big theme pubs to acquire more units in…

Abstract

The licensed property marked has never been busier. However, it is not one market but several. There is a drive by operators of the big theme pubs to acquire more units in retail trading areas where they compete head‐on with retailers and caterers. Valuations reflect not only the huge profits to be made from these units but also stock market valuations of the companies themselves and the alternative use values of key A1/A3 sites. The traditional tenanted pubs, the town and village “local”, is also in keen demand from expanding specialist companies who need size to be ever more efficient. These companies are in competition with those who wish to provide securitised packages of assets. This paper discusses these trends and the effect that they have on the value and valuation of licensed premises.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article

In the period before Britain entered the European Community and again at the Labour Government's referendum, one factor which caused most concern in both those in favour…

Abstract

In the period before Britain entered the European Community and again at the Labour Government's referendum, one factor which caused most concern in both those in favour and those against entry, was the possible loss of sovereignty by the Houses of Parliament to a supra‐national body. That there would be some loss was accepted but fears that it would be anything more than minimal were discounted, and not enough to affect the lives of ordinary people. Far‐reaching changes required by some of the EEC food directives and regulations, which even if held in abeyance for the usual transitional period will have to be implemented eventually, must be causing many to have second thoughts on this. If more were needed, the embarassing situation at the recent energy conference, at which Britain, as a major oil producer, demanded a separate seat, but had to submit to the overall authority of the Community, the other members of which, figuratively, do not produce a gallon of oil between them. A shift of power from Whitehall to Brussels may not be so evident at higher levels of government, however, as in secondary legislation; the language of the departments of government.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

In those frightening years between the two Wars and governments in France came and went with dismal frequency, it used to be said that any French Government which…

Abstract

In those frightening years between the two Wars and governments in France came and went with dismal frequency, it used to be said that any French Government which permitted food prices to rise had no chance whatever of surviving, and the result was that food was bountiful and incredibly cheap. Times have changed dramatically but not the attitude of people to the price and availibility of food and, in particular of political control; this is very much the same as always. Mostly, it revolves around the woman and what she sees as an abuse, greed and taking mean advantage of prevailing conditions and, make no mistake, this will be reflected in the political field; in the way she votes. It has happened in previous elections; it will happen in even greater degree in the next election and, although not decisive, it can have a not insignificant impact. None know better than the housewife how meaningless is the smug talk of the politicians when it comes to food prices. Their attitude may not have been the main factor in throwing out the last Conservative Government; this was undoubtedly the fear that their continuance in office would result in widespread strikes and the serious effect these upheavals have on food prices (and other household necessit ies), but the votes of woman were an unimportant contribution. As it was, it mattered little to the muscle men of the trade unions which party is in power. Women's talk around the shops and supermarket's, up and down the High Street to‐day is one long grumble and disillusionment with politicians generally.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 81 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

John Pratten and Bob Greig

To study the problems of alcohol‐related crime in the UK, and to describe the operation of a Pubwatch scheme which attempts to unite the police and the licensees in…

Abstract

Purpose

To study the problems of alcohol‐related crime in the UK, and to describe the operation of a Pubwatch scheme which attempts to unite the police and the licensees in bringing effective action against those involved.

Design/methodology/approach

Reference has been made to Home Office sources to discover the extent of the problem. Schemes which have alleviated the problem have been examined. The general principles of Pubwatch are studied, and then its effectiveness in a specific operation is examined as a case study.

Findings

The study has revealed that the police regard Pubwatch as an effective weapon. Some licensees agree, and even believe that its operation can increase.

Research limitations/implications

This study merely reports on the outcome from one licensing authority. It is clear that the impact of Pubwatch must be monitored in more detail and over many areas before its real impact can be determined.

Practical implications

The concept is clearly worthy of consideration for all of the licensed trade. It could become a vital weapon in the campaign towards responsible drinking.

Originality/value

It is hoped that this paper will initiate debate on the scheme, and to examine solutions to the problem of anti‐social behaviour caused by alcohol. Thus it should be of value to licensees and pub owners, the police and local authorities, as well as the public at large.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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