Search results

1 – 10 of over 16000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Evelyn Kerslake and Anne Goulding

Reports findings of research investigating the training needs and opportunities of flexible information workers. Concludes that unless positive action is taken to address…

Abstract

Reports findings of research investigating the training needs and opportunities of flexible information workers. Concludes that unless positive action is taken to address the needs of flexible information workers, they have fewer training opportunities than other workers, which has negative implications for overall levels of skill in the information labour market. Draws on quantitative data from a survey of 551 UK library and information services, and qualitative data from focus groups with flexible information workers and interviews with their managers. Argues that there are legislative, quality and workforce planning imperatives urging managers to address the needs of flexible information workers. Illustrates the differentiation in training offered to flexible and permanent full‐time workers using both quantitative and qualitative work. Presents examples from the case study organizations to offer ways to counteract these difficulties.

Details

Library Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Anne Goulding and Evelyn Kerslake

Describes the extent of flexible working practices in library and information services (LIS) in the UK, drawing on a recently completed study. Outlines concerns about…

Abstract

Describes the extent of flexible working practices in library and information services (LIS) in the UK, drawing on a recently completed study. Outlines concerns about training expressed by managers in case study organizations and in the literature. Investigates gender and equal opportunity implications in training flexible workers when LIS continue to be dominated numerically by women, yet hierarchically by men. Discusses examples of gender‐based discrimination in training provision and allocation taken from the literature in women’s studies and business studies. Considers the potential of National Vocational Qualifications and the Library Association’s framework for continuing professional development in relation to flexible workers. Outlines the British Library Research and Development Department‐funded study investigating training for flexible LIS workers.

Details

Librarian Career Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-0810

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2016

Sarah Barriage

This chapter explores the relationship between unionization in the information sector and the concepts of human rights and social justice.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the relationship between unionization in the information sector and the concepts of human rights and social justice.

Methodology/approach

Recent trends in unionization rates in the United States and Canada are examined, as well as examples of union activity in the information sector drawn from the Union Library Workers blog. The concept of social justice unionism and its applicability to the information sector is discussed.

Findings

While overall unionization rates in both the United States and Canada are in decline, unionization rates in libraries and other information institutions in both countries are among the highest of any industrial sector. Unions continue to engage in activities that promote the rights of their workers and the people who benefit from the services these workers provide.

Social implications

Social justice unionism offers a way for library workers to actively promote social justice for all, not just their workers and their patrons, through a commitment to broader issues affecting their communities at large.

Originality/value

Much of the work on unionization in the information sector focuses on “bread-and-butter” issues related directly to unionized workers and the benefits that unionization brings to both the workers and their workplaces. This chapter explores the role of the union in promoting human rights and social justice on a broader scale, introducing a discussion of the concept of social justice unionism.

Details

Perspectives on Libraries as Institutions of Human Rights and Social Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-057-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Andrew Brenza, Michelle Kowalsky and Denise Brush

This paper aims to develop a better understanding of student worker perceptions of academic libraries in an effort to improve student worker training, position structure…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a better understanding of student worker perceptions of academic libraries in an effort to improve student worker training, position structure and, ultimately, their perceptions of the library. The value of student reference assistants extends well beyond the completion of assigned library tasks. Specifically, student reference assistants can be important community voices and advocates for academic libraries, spreading, by word-of-mouth, the kinds of library services available to students and their relevance to the academic community. Consequently, it is essential to gain an understanding of how student workers perceive the academic library as a result of their employment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an informal, anonymous online survey of student reference assistants to gather information on student worker perceptions of the library. Questions focus on student workers’ understanding of library services and resources as well as on the library’s mission and purpose. An analysis of student responses is provided in light of four “ideal” perceptions which the librarians hold for all students.

Findings

Overall, student worker responses to the survey generally aligned with the ideal perceptions. However, misalignments suggest the need for training that focuses on the development of a broader understanding of the library’s role in the academic community.

Practical implications

The paper can help academic librarians gain insight on how student workers understand the role of the library within the larger academic community and how positive student worker perceptions can be leveraged for outreach purposes.

Originality/value

This paper examines an important aspect of student worker perception that has generally been overlooked in the literature.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2015

Sonnet Ireland and Jennifer Jackson

To examine the use of student workers in libraries, and to outline how a student worker training program can be designed and implemented. A review of published works…

Abstract

To examine the use of student workers in libraries, and to outline how a student worker training program can be designed and implemented. A review of published works (1978–2014), which aims to provide information on training and using student workers for more advanced tasks. A description of the history of student workers in the reference department of the Earl K. Long Library, along with a detailed account of the training used to transform the Student Reference Assistant positions. Finally, a survey sent electronically to all Louisiana academic libraries to gather information on how other libraries use student workers. Many libraries rely on student workers for staff-level tasks. Libraries can use student workers to fill in staffing gaps, to a certain extent, as long as a proper training program is implemented. Research was limited to Louisiana academic libraries, so it is not a comprehensive view of student workers throughout the country. While there were a good number of respondents, the survey was not answered by representatives of each Louisiana academic library. A broader study of how student workers are used in libraries should be conducted in the future. Many libraries still rely on staff to do everything. This chapter will provide libraries with options for using student workers in more advanced ways. It also offers key guidelines to follow when forming a training program. Most research in this area focuses on training or assessing student workers and not on finding ways to use them to fill in staffing gaps.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Anne Goulding and Evelyn Kerslake

Flexible workers are a growing part of the library and information sector, as they are in the service sector generally. Yet their specific needs and requirements have been…

Abstract

Flexible workers are a growing part of the library and information sector, as they are in the service sector generally. Yet their specific needs and requirements have been greatly ignored. Outlines increasing flexibility in the labour market generally and discusses flexibility in library and information services. Discusses the incidence of established flexible working patterns such as part‐time, job‐share, temporary and flexi‐time working, and also of newer work forms such as homeworking and annualized hours. Uses data from a survey of 475 library and information services with a staff of 38,008 individuals. Examines the advantages and disadvantages of flexible working, and outlines the solutions worked out by case study organizations and managers. Suggests that effective use of flexible workers in library and information services necessitates the updating of management techniques and organizational strategy.

Details

Library Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Keren Dali

Purpose – In this chapter, I present a systematic discussion of the relationship between social work (SW) and library and information science (LIS) and explore how SW can…

Abstract

Purpose – In this chapter, I present a systematic discussion of the relationship between social work (SW) and library and information science (LIS) and explore how SW can contribute to the education of LIS practitioners so that they become more than information facilitators and grow professionally to be true agents of change.

Design/Methodology/Approach – Using engagement with immigrant communities as a case in point and building on the empirical comparative study of public librarians in the Greater Toronto Area and New York City, I outline the current gaps and deficiencies of LIS curricula that can be rectified through blended education. I also integrate the potential contributions of SW into LIS through the case study of an immigrant member of a library community.

Findings – Building on the case study, I introduce a four-tiered model that can be applied to a wide array of courses in LIS programs and conclude with suggestions for taking steps toward blending SW perspectives into the LIS curriculum.

Originality/Value – I position the potential fusion of SW and LIS as “professional blendedness,” which serves as a catalyst for change, and also examine the concept of the blended professional as a change agent. I introduce the rationale for adopting theoretical, practical, and pedagogical approaches from SW in the field of LIS and focus on four specific contributions that can most benefit LIS:

  • the person-in-environment approach;

  • the strengths perspective and empowerment;

  • the interrelated notions of cultural competence, diversity, and intersectionality; and

  • the theory-mindedness approach (including theory and practice models).

the person-in-environment approach;

the strengths perspective and empowerment;

the interrelated notions of cultural competence, diversity, and intersectionality; and

the theory-mindedness approach (including theory and practice models).

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-884-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Janet Shuter

Whether they can legitimately be described as virtuosi or one man (sic) bands, information professionals working in isolation have become something of a cause célèbre…

Abstract

Whether they can legitimately be described as virtuosi or one man (sic) bands, information professionals working in isolation have become something of a cause célèbre recently. This study looks first at their contribution to the collection, analysis, synthesis and dissemination of information in a single field — that of employment studies. Then, using the test of relative job satisfaction as a function of effectiveness, the characteristics, problems and satisfactions of the workers themselves are examined. The present work is based on two reports of a survey undertaken on behalf of the British Library Research and Development Department in 1983.

Details

Library Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2013

Heather A. Jacobson and Kristen S. Shuyler

This study aims to explore the positive and negative effects of working in an academic library, as reported by college students.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the positive and negative effects of working in an academic library, as reported by college students.

Design/methodology/approach

Through surveys and interviews, student workers shared their perceptions of how employment in a university library affects their academics, social life, engagement with campus life, professional skill development, and emotional/psychological states.

Findings

Results indicate that the library job is seen as a generally positive part of the students' college experience, particularly in the areas of skill development and academic performance. However, neutral, mixed, and negative effects exist as well.

Research limitations/implications

Findings may not be generalizable due to the limited number of participants and their employment in a single department. Future research could include students in other departments, libraries, or universities. This study employed a single survey and interview, capturing a snapshot of student perceptions. A more longitudinal approach could examine how the attitudes and perceptions of working students change over time as a result of their employment.

Practical implications

This study presents suggestions for how librarians, faculty, staff, and administrators can promote working students' academic success and professional development.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a new perspective to the current literature on the academic and social effects of library employment. By gathering student perceptions via surveys and interviews, this research provides one of the first analyses of the experiences of library student workers as shared in their own voices.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Gillian Coker, Jennifer Drury, Anne Goulding and Evelyn Kerslake

Discusses the results of three studies investigating the reception of Scottish/ National Vocational Qualifications (S/NVQs) in the information and library sector. Examines…

Abstract

Discusses the results of three studies investigating the reception of Scottish/ National Vocational Qualifications (S/NVQs) in the information and library sector. Examines the views of managers and workers towards the qualifications. Although managers generally feel that S/NVQs are a useful way of accrediting the skills of those without professional library qualifications, concerns remain about their bureaucratic and time‐consuming nature. Among library workers, a considerable lack of knowledge still exists although there is enthusiasm for a flexible and accessible qualification that can be acquired on the job. The evidence suggests that attitudes towards S/NVQs in the information and library sector remain equivocal and that a degree of confusion and lack of understanding prevails.

Details

Library Review, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 16000