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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Niels Ole Pors

The paper analyses students' use of public libraries for study purposes and discusses the public library as a substitute or a complement for educational or academic…

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3396

Abstract

Purpose

The paper analyses students' use of public libraries for study purposes and discusses the public library as a substitute or a complement for educational or academic libraries. The paper also investigates which segments of students rely heavily on public libraries as services for study purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a comprehensive survey of Danish students from both universities and other higher institutions of education. The data collection was carried out by an online survey and the sample consists of students from all over the country covering a multitude of different institutions and subject areas.

Findings

It is evident from the research that students do not bypass the physical library and it is also evident that the use of physical libraries and digital resources complement each other. The place of Google in the students' information behaviour is prominent and positively correlated to use of traditional library resources. Nearly 60 per cent of all students use the local public library for study purposes. A small group consisting of 7 per cent of the students uses the public library as their only library for study purposes. One of the more striking findings is that the service level of public libraries in relation to study topics appears to be very uneven, which means that different groups of students have very varied probabilities of success using the public library. The data also indicates that students tend to look at libraries as a whole and do not make clear distinctions between different types of libraries, expecting the whole system to be seamless. The paper also relates the findings to the general body of literature on students' information seeking behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The research raises questions concerning the detailed behaviour of students' information behaviour, for example, how they combine formalised resources with more general resources. The paper also indicates that it is probably counter‐productive to evaluate students as one group. Different segments of students have very different and varied information behaviour patterns depending on study topic, study year, psychological dispositions and other demographic factors.

Practical implications

The paper raises important managerial questions and concerns in relation to both the mission of public libraries and the service level given to different segments of students.

Originality/value

The research supports existing international research on students' information behaviour. The research is based on a comprehensive and nation‐wide sample and it emphasises students' information behaviour in relation to several important demographic factors, and it also asserts that it is important to investigate further the differing modes of behaviour. The paper points to the interplay between formalised information resources and search engines.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Lauren Mandel

The purpose of this paper is to share the research processes and results of secondary analysis using GIS to map usage of a university library to contribute to ongoing…

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1063

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share the research processes and results of secondary analysis using GIS to map usage of a university library to contribute to ongoing efforts to help identify how library spaces are used to explain how university libraries can continue to evolve as teaching, learning, and shared communities of scholars. This paper details the use of ArcGIS to visualize where students are in the library in order to explain how this method can used by libraries to visualize the use of their facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This research utilized secondary analysis of data collected during seating sweeps; through secondary analysis, data were analyzed and visualized in ArcGIS. The seating sweeps were conducted three times a day during a sample week, with researchers noting on maps of the library floor plan where students were sitting. Data were entered into an ArcGIS database file and mapped to display usage directly on the library map to improve stakeholders’ understanding of the ways students are using the library as a place.

Findings

Even though this project used consistent instruments and procedural instructions and trained observers, a combination of factors resulted in an incomplete data set, including the length of time between research design and data collection and lack of agreement about the use of map worksheets. It was still possible to make maps that depict heavier and lighter areas of use, present data to library stakeholders, and show what can be accomplished when data are collected on copies of the floor plan.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited by being a conducted in one university library, but the implications far outweigh the limitations. While bar and pie charts are effective at visualizing data, they do not provide a way to visualize where activities occur; maps provide multi-layered visualization, allowing libraries to visualize the same usage data as bar, pie, or other charts in addition to seeing where that usage occurs. The implications for librarianship include better understanding of how library spaces are used and the ability to use visually appealing maps to demonstrate the library’s use, value, and impact.

Originality/value

Mapping library statistics is an area that has been growing in the last decade, but practical examples of using GIS to map facility usage are few. This paper explains in detail how the mapping process works and how libraries of all types can adapt this method for their own usage assessments to more vividly depict the value and impact of the library facility as a place.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

Ellen Forsyth and Leanne Perry

Flickr is being used by an increasing number of public libraries for providing access to collections and services for their communities. Public libraries are also using

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2287

Abstract

Purpose

Flickr is being used by an increasing number of public libraries for providing access to collections and services for their communities. Public libraries are also using Flickr to build community engagement. Local communities are participating in building collections on Flickr, adding context and their own stories to images. The purpose of this paper is to explore public library expectations and strategic objectives for using Flickr.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses Flickr statistics from public libraries around the world as well as qualitative survey feedback to analyse the impact of Flickr on public libraries.

Findings

The paper explores public library expectations and strategic objectives for using Flickr, what the libraries have observed about their presence on Flickr, how Flickr relates to the other social networking tools they are using, what is the tagging, commenting, favouriting activity like, and how the libraries have responded to the use of their images on Flickr.

Research limitations/implications

This information will enable public libraries to plan more effectively for their presence via Flickr and how to use it with other web 2.0 developments.

Originality/value

This paper usefully investigates the increased public library use and impact of Flickr that had not been evaluated in any depth.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Qun G. Jiao and Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie

Reports on a study of 522 university students, undertaken to determine how often they used their library and why, as well as to develop a general profile of college…

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2210

Abstract

Reports on a study of 522 university students, undertaken to determine how often they used their library and why, as well as to develop a general profile of college student library users. Descriptive statistics revealed that the majority of students used the library at least once a week. Obtaining a book or an article for a course paper was the most common reason cited for library use, followed by studying for a test, and then using the computerized indexes and online facilities. A setwise multiple regression analysis reveals that students who used the libraries most tended to be older, male, those who did not speak English as their native language, who lived the nearest to the academic library, who preferred to study alone, and who had the lowest levels of library anxiety. In addition, these students tended to visit the library to study for a test, to read current newspapers, to read their own textbook, to use computerized indexes and online facilities, or to meet friends. Discusses the implications of these findings and makes recommendations for future research.

Details

Library Review, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Hafiz Muhammad Khalid, Khalid Mahmood and Jonathan Willson

Surveys the status of cataloguing practice in university libraries in three Asian developing countries, Pakistan, Malaysia, and Saudi Arabia. Examines the extent of the…

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1005

Abstract

Surveys the status of cataloguing practice in university libraries in three Asian developing countries, Pakistan, Malaysia, and Saudi Arabia. Examines the extent of the usage of international cataloguing tools like cataloguing codes (AACR, ISBD), classification schemes (DDC, LC) and subject heading lists (Sears, LCSH). Finds that there is an overall uniformity in the use of technical tools. There is a trend towards automation of cataloguing services. With the help of new technology, more access points for catalogue searching have been made available. Online catalogues are also replacing all traditional catalogue forms, i.e. Card, Printed, and Microform. Survey findings show that, in using new information technology in technical services, Malaysian university libraries are more advanced than those of Pakistan and Saudi Arabia.

Details

Library Review, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Judi Briden and Ann Marshall

The purpose of this paper is to quantify recent changes in students' use of laptops in one academic library and to consider the potential role of new high‐tech library

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1137

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to quantify recent changes in students' use of laptops in one academic library and to consider the potential role of new high‐tech library spaces on laptop use.

Design/methodology/approach

Instead of relying on standard library exit and entrance counts, this study was based on brief, structured observations of library spaces, including counts of laptop use. By conducting such observations over regular intervals in both new and pre‐existing library spaces, the authors were able to observe changes in laptop use across both time and type of library space.

Findings

The growth in laptop use dramatically exceeded expectations: 28 percent of students used laptops in existing spaces in 2005, while 62 percent of students used laptops in the same spaces in 2008. While a new, adjoining high‐tech space also had high laptop use, the opening of this new space coincided with growth in both laptop use and overall student presence in the pre‐existing library spaces. In addition, the paper posits a variety of potential causes for these changes, including available technology and hardware, university‐wide policy, and student behavior.

Originality/value

The changing use of laptops in libraries is important for administrative decision making at both the library and institutional level, including decisions about facilities, technology infrastructure and support, and security.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Kingdom Hudron Kari and Ebikabowei Emmanuel Baro

– The study aimed to look at the library software in use in Nigerian university libraries, and the challenges and frustrations experienced in their automation projects.

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4920

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to look at the library software in use in Nigerian university libraries, and the challenges and frustrations experienced in their automation projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a descriptive survey method and covers university libraries in Nigeria. A questionnaire was used to collect data from 32 university libraries in Nigeria.

Findings

The study revealed that university libraries in Nigeria widely use library software such as KOHA, SLAM and VIRTUA for their library operations. Challenges such as lack of skilled manpower, lack of fund, absence of modern systems (computers) and erratic power supply were identified as the major problems university libraries in Nigeria encountered while using library software. Librarians recommended the use of KOHA, SLAM or VIRTUA library software for use by university libraries that are in search for library software to use.

Originality/value

The findings of this study will provide useful information to librarians and library administrators in Nigeria and other developing countries who want to automate their library operations.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

A.A. Adeleke and R. Olorunsola

The purpose of this paper is to report the survey on the use of online tools and techniques for cataloguing and classification in Nigerian libraries.

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2946

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the survey on the use of online tools and techniques for cataloguing and classification in Nigerian libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was designed to elicit information from librarians on pertinent areas relating to the use of online tools for processing library resources.

Findings

The results of the survey reveal a high level of awareness among librarians in Nigeria about the benefits that could be derived in the use of online tools for cataloguing and classification processes. The study further reveals the need for continuing education programmes for cataloguers for effective use of the tools. The study shows that the use of online tools has advantages over manual methods. Librarians perceived the method to be useful and easy to use. The paper reveals ICT infrastructural facilities as major constraints facing libraries in the use of online tools. One of the expectations at the onset of the follow‐up study was that most of the problems identified with the use of the online tools in the Redeemer's University library study would not be different from the challenges facing other libraries. The results of this study have proved this to be true.

Practical implications

The conclusion rests on the need for an intensive continuing education programme to teach the skills required for online operations and the provision of web‐driven facilities in Nigerian libraries.

Originality/value

The paper provides information on libraries' awareness on the use of online methods for processing library resources, their efficiency and attitude of librarians to such tools. The paper shows that libraries in developing countries like Nigeria should intensify efforts to close the gap between them and those in the developed countries in terms of ICT literacy.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Yan Quan Liu

Librarians have been involved in collecting and disseminating statistics for many years. Utilizing statistics to describe and assess the operation of library activities as…

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1037

Abstract

Librarians have been involved in collecting and disseminating statistics for many years. Utilizing statistics to describe and assess the operation of library activities as a part of library tradition has received growing attention from researchers, policymakers, library managers, and professionals. However, few studies have investigated how statistics are used in libraries. This report compares directors’ uses of statistics provided by national agencies in the USA and China to highlight differences and similarities of the uses the two countries’ directors make of statistics and the statistical information that directors find particular useful. The results are intended to provide library administrators with an insight of how library statistics are used in the managerial process and may also help the national statistical providers to obtain an understanding of the characteristics and pattern of use of their products.

Details

New Library World, vol. 102 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Helis Miido

A total of 1641 questionnaires were mailed in March 1990 to members of the US Medical Library Association and the European Association of Health Libraries and Librarians…

Abstract

A total of 1641 questionnaires were mailed in March 1990 to members of the US Medical Library Association and the European Association of Health Libraries and Librarians, requesting information on the status of automating the processing of serials and books. Of the 1641 questionnaires mailed, 626 (38%) valid responses were received for analysis. Depending on geographic area, between 37% and 46% of the medical libraries surveyed process all serial functions manually. A greater number of US libraries have automated all procedures for processing serials (11% as opposed to 9% in Canada and 8% in Europe). A greater proportion have automated some procedures (42% in Europe and 40% in both the US and Canada). Between 23% and 34% process all book functions manually. A greater proportion of Canadian libraries have automated all book functions (26% as opposed to 14% in the US and 13% in Europe). A greater proportion of European libraries have automated some book functions (58% as opposed to 47% in the US and 34% in Canada). Personal computers are used more often than the mainframe/minicomputers to process both serials and books. Not all libraries use the same system throughout for automating all library functions, and a number of libraries ‘mix and match’ multiple systems or use systems which are specific to a geographic location. The most frequently used systems on the personal computer and mainframe/minicomputer for processing serials and books are given by function within geographic location.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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