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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Xinya Yang, Qunyi Wei and Xiaodong Peng

The purpose of this article is to present a subsection circulatory management (SCM) model of Library 2.0. The design idea of Library 2.0 system architecture is to be…

4183

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present a subsection circulatory management (SCM) model of Library 2.0. The design idea of Library 2.0 system architecture is to be illustrated and a five‐tier model of service‐oriented architecture (SOA) is to be put forward and analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

The SOA model conforms to the desires of Library 2.0. Libraries require integration of literature resources, knowledge services and operations management and together all these integrations must be based on the user service. The realization of the concept and technology of Library 2.0 is similar with the SOA model.

Findings

Current library management systems (LMS) remain at the era of Library 1.0, which focused on literature management. The new design principles are aiming to manage library resources much better. Library 2.0 must break through the current framework, and adopt a multilayer structure, user‐centered and service‐oriented system architecture to integrate the resources, the services and managements. Amongst other things, Library 2.0 should utilize the multilayer architecture based on the module mode, improve the flexibility and adaptability of modern management systems, both in system configuration and operational management.

Originality/value

The SOA model is applied in Library 2.0 for the first time and is divided into five tiers – hardware tier, system tier, data tier, operation management tier and knowledge service tier. According to the architecture, three application systems – LMS based on librarians, knowledge service system based on patrons, and knowledge search engine, are designed.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Shakeel Ahmad Khan and Ghulam Ayesha

The purpose of this study is to investigate the key features of information management systems (IMSs) for automation in university libraries. This study also highlights…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the key features of information management systems (IMSs) for automation in university libraries. This study also highlights the use of library information management systems in university libraries and the satisfaction of university librarians in using various IMS.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is quantitative in nature. A survey research method has been applied to achieve the research objectives. Purposive sampling has been used to select the targeted population which consisted of 157 librarians working in university libraries. Data were collected through a web-based questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied to analyze the collected data by using SPSS software.

Findings

Free and open source software are widely used in university libraries to manage the bibliographic information of library material. KOHA is the most used software for library automation in university libraries of Pakistan. The key features of library information management system (IMS) include reliability and security of the software, user-friendly interface, advance searching options, use of library standards (MARC, Uni MARC, RDA), online upgradation, technical support of developing company, shared cataloging, multilingual features of software, etc (See Figure 4). The study recommends that the above-mentioned features must be considered by university librarians when selecting any software for library automation. Results showed that apart from the use of KOHA software, there are also some other software which are being used for library automation in university libraries of Pakistan. These systems include; Virtua, Library Management System (LMS), and Library Information Management Systems (LIMSs).

Practical implications

This study has practical implications for university librarians in Pakistan as well as in other countries. Librarians can use the results of this study as a blueprint before selecting any information management system to automate the library record.

Originality/value

This study identifies the core features of IMS for automation in libraries. These features have been recommended by informational professionals who have been working in automated libraries and possess adequate professional experience in using library automation software.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Shelagh Fisher, Rachel Delbridge and Siân Lambert

A library management system is a significant investment for libraries, but the procurement of a system is an infrequent activity with little opportunity for librarians to…

1337

Abstract

A library management system is a significant investment for libraries, but the procurement of a system is an infrequent activity with little opportunity for librarians to build on their experience. The procurement process is also difficult for potential system suppliers who must respond to specifications which are variable in content, format and quality. The HARMONISE project aimed to determine the feasibility of developing a model system specification which could be used to assist libraries in the procurement of library management systems. Specifications collected from libraries which had recently acquired a library management system were analysed. The results demonstrate that the functional requirements specified for each of the core modules had strong similarities both within and across library sectors. A survey of UK system suppliers was also undertaken to determine their views on the specification as a procurement tool. Suppliers expressed frustration with the tendency for specifications to be dominated by lists of functional requirements which were present in all library management systems on the market today. In conclusion, a model specification incorporating basic functions, which can be expected in all library management systems, should be developed.

Details

Program, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Shelagh Fisher and Jennifer Rowley

Management information facilities transform the library management system into a much more effective management tool. Three levels of management can be identified …

Abstract

Management information facilities transform the library management system into a much more effective management tool. Three levels of management can be identified — operational, tactical and strategic — and each of these has its own unique management information needs. Earlier work on the use of management information in libraries and the development of management information systems demonstrates that progress in these areas has been slow. Management information systems comprise three components: facilities for handling ad hoc enquiries; facilities for standard report generation; and management information modules, or report generators that support the production of user‐defined reports. A list of standard reports covering acquisitions, cataloguing, circulation control, serials and inter‐library loans is provided. The functions of report generators are explored and the nature of enquiry facilities reviewed. Management information tools available in library management systems form a valuable aid in decision making. These should be further exploited and further developed.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

G.G. Chowdhury and Sudatta Chowdhury

Digital library research has attracted much attention in the most developed, and in a number of developing, countries. While many digital library research projects are…

4137

Abstract

Digital library research has attracted much attention in the most developed, and in a number of developing, countries. While many digital library research projects are funded by government agencies and national and international bodies, some are run by specific academic and research institutions and libraries, either individually or collaboratively. While some digital library projects, such as the ELINOR project in the UK, the first two phases of the eLib (Electronic Libraries) Programme in the UK, and the first phase of DLI (Digital Library Initiative) in the US, are now over, a number of other projects are currently under way in different parts of the world. Beginning with the definitions and characteristics of digital libraries, as proposed by various researchers, this paper provides brief accounts of some major digital library projects that are currently in progress, or are just completed, in different parts of the world. There follows a review of digital library research under sixteen major headings. Literature for this review has been identified through a search on LISA CD‐ROM database, and a Dialog search on library and information science databases, and the resulting output has been supplemented by a scan of the various issues of D‐Lib Magazine and Ariadne, and the websites of various organisations and institutions engaged in digital library research. The review indicates that we have learned a lot through digital library research within a short span of time. However, a number of issues are yet to be resolved. The paper ends with an indication of the research issues that need to be addressed and resolved in the near future in order to bring the digital library from the researcher‘s laboratory to the real life environment.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Lorcan Dempsey, Rosemary Russell and Robin Murray

The management of autonomous, heterogeneous network resources and services provides new challenges which libraries are now addressing. This paper outlines an approach…

Abstract

The management of autonomous, heterogeneous network resources and services provides new challenges which libraries are now addressing. This paper outlines an approach based on the construction of broker services which mediate access to resources. It outlines a framework – the MODELS Information Architecture – for thinking about the components of broker services and their logical arrangement. It describes several development projects and services which show how brokers are developing. It uses examples drawn from the serials environment to describe some of the issues. Technologists understand that they must build more stable and unobtrusive media. They must establish more coherent contexts into which the technology may disappear.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 55 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Sheila Cannell and Fred Guy

This paper discusses cross‐sectoral collaboration in procuring and implementing a new library management system. After a historical review of collaboration in this area in…

Abstract

This paper discusses cross‐sectoral collaboration in procuring and implementing a new library management system. After a historical review of collaboration in this area in the UK and other countries, it focuses on the joint purchase of the Voyager system (supplied by Endeavor Information Systems Inc.) by Edinburgh University and the National Library of Scotland. The differing missions and automation histories of the two institutions are discussed, followed by a practical summary of the procurement and implementation processes. The theoretical and practical advantages and disadvantages of this form of collaborative approach between academic and government organisations are described.

Details

Program, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Amanda Magnussen

In recent years, there have been considerable developments in both international and national laws relating to copyright, as governments struggle to come to terms with…

Abstract

In recent years, there have been considerable developments in both international and national laws relating to copyright, as governments struggle to come to terms with developments in technology. Libraries, too, are attempting to find appropriate ways of managing the rights in electronic materials. Based on a research trip made to the UK in 2001, explores some of the electronic rights management systems and solutions being developed in UK libraries and information organisations. Study participants were interviewed about the various technologies that have been developed in this area, the types of materials covered by each, and their costs, availability and intended future developments, with a view to gaining an understanding of the electronic rights management tools that might be available to libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Jane Cho

Recently emerged Software as a Service (SaaS)‐based services show that it is possible to curtail cost on operation and maintenance and also to reduce additional expenses…

2974

Abstract

Purpose

Recently emerged Software as a Service (SaaS)‐based services show that it is possible to curtail cost on operation and maintenance and also to reduce additional expenses required for system upgrades. It also allows creating new values by consolidating resources of individual users on a provider's platform, which is effectively applicable to library networks for resource sharing. The aim of this study is to present a next‐generation SaaS‐based library management system and its operational model. In addition, the paper seeks to discuss the availability of knowledge‐based services for the system.

Design/methodology/approach

First, this study analyzes trends in open library environments, as well as issues in the operation of library management systems. Second, it examines differences between reference models of SaaS and those of ASP solutions, and case studies on recent applications of the approaches are also performed. Third, the study forecasts effects expected when the SaaS model will be fully applied to the library network. And finally, the study presents functional requirements and an operation model of SaaS‐based library management systems.

Findings

In this study a model of a SaaS‐based system which can apply library network is presented. The model is composed of: SaaS platform comprising application service layer, common service layer and service resources; network service platform to support information sharing between participating libraries and local libraries clients.

Originality/value

The SaaS‐based system will enhance the economic efficiency of local library operations and make available new functionalities on an on‐demand basis. Also, its feature, such as sharing a single platform among several libraries, facilitates resource sharing and knowledge‐based services.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Juliet Leeves

Interlibrary loan (ILL) management systems are an importantcomponent in the document supply process. They manage, at a local level,the various processes associated with…

Abstract

Interlibrary loan (ILL) management systems are an important component in the document supply process. They manage, at a local level, the various processes associated with requesting and obtaining documents. There may be links with other component systems, such as location/messaging systems, facilitated by various telecommunications networks, and integrated library housekeeping systems, for ongoing local control. ILL management systems can run as stand‐alone systems or as part of integrated housekeeping systems. Integration can offer, via the circulation module, ongoing control of interlibrary loans, in addition to loans from the library′s own stock, using the same borrower file. It may also be possible to request ILL items via the on‐line catalogue if the user has failed to find an item in stock. Functions which can be automated include: input and transmission of requests; receipt and loan; returns; overdues and recalls; renewals; reports and reapplications; chasers; and cancellations. Systems can also provide management information and control the loan of items to other libraries. In the UK, the links to networks are used, in the main, for transmission of requests, to BLDSC via ARTTel, or via e‐mail to other libraries. BLDSC is the major source for inter‐lending in the UK, and the volume of requests to other libraries is small; however, as network links increase, ILL will become less centralized and there will be greater traffic between libraries for the purposes of ILL.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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