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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Jill Mierke

This case study aims to explain why one Canadian academic library chose to design and deliver in-house leadership development training for its employees, rather than…

1818

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to explain why one Canadian academic library chose to design and deliver in-house leadership development training for its employees, rather than taking a consortial approach, and seeks to highlight the impact of this decision on the library's organizational culture.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is presented in three parts: the benefits and challenges of in-house, external and consortial training; the impact of an in-house leadership development program at the University Library at the University of Saskatchewan; and considerations when deciding whether to collaborate on the provision of employee training. The author draws upon her own personal experiences as the Director of Human Resources for the library, and presents evidence acquired through surveys, observations, and conversations.

Findings

The paper explains how a deliberate decision to provide in-house leadership training had a transformative effect on individual employees and the organization.

Practical implications

When considering collaborating to provide leadership development training, library administrators should ensure the pros and cons of doing so are thoroughly explored; the pressure to collaborate can sometimes lead to participation in activities simply to be seen as a “good library citizen,” and often such activities are not necessarily contributing to the strategic goals of the library. In economically challenging times, library leaders and decision makers will need to be very aware of these implications.

Originality/value

This paper discusses why a library chose an in-house approach to leadership development training rather than a consortial approach. This article has value to library administrators as they consider implementing leadership development training in their libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Barbara M. Sorondo

This chapter provides an overview of affect, personality, and job satisfaction, focusing on library employees. A reliable and valid measure for each construct is…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of affect, personality, and job satisfaction, focusing on library employees. A reliable and valid measure for each construct is suggested, and an assessment model is provided. The purpose of the study conducted was to examine the three constructs among library employees, how these constructs relate to each other and to work experience, and whether they differ based on library type or department. The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Big Five Inventory, and Brief Index of Affective Job Satisfaction were administered at the various libraries of a research university. Data were analyzed using statistical software. Library employees scored high in positive affect and job satisfaction, and low in negative affect, and were introverted, agreeable, conscientious, emotionally stable, and open to experiences. Across all libraries, public services employees had higher positive affect and job satisfaction, and lower neuroticism, than technical services employees. In both service areas, positive affect was positively correlated with extroversion and job satisfaction, and negative affect with neuroticism. Work experience was correlated with positive affect only among technical services employees. The assessment model may be applied at libraries of any type and size to assess staff and customize resources for employees to meet their unique needs. Several ideas and applications are provided. This study addresses a gap in the literature by exploring how affect, personality, and job satisfaction are all related among library employees. The free measures may be used in any work setting, facilitating intra- and inter-professional comparisons.

Details

Emotion in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-083-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Connie Chapman

The purpose of this paper is to promote the notion that an orientation plan and socialization to the culture of the organization are crucial components for the retention…

4340

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to promote the notion that an orientation plan and socialization to the culture of the organization are crucial components for the retention of library employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of selected literature was conducted from both within and outside librarianship to determine the relationship orientation and socialization have to retention.

Findings

Employee orientation is a multi‐stage process utilizing both formal and informal activities that help assist the employee to become part of the culture of any organization, including the library. A human resources program that includes well‐planned processes for recruitment, selection, orientation, socialization and retention will help a library be more competitive as librarians retire. Paying attention to these processes is increasingly important as we enter the period in which the baby boomer generation is moving toward retirement.

Practical implications

As baby‐boomer librarians retire, libraries should strive to maintain retention by improving current orientation practices and assisting with socialization to the organizational culture. The orientation process and retention can be improved by the use of checklists, the support of the immediate supervisor, and appointing a mentor.

Originality/value

The paper provides considerations that may assist planning approaches for libraries considering future staffing in a shrinking employment market.

Details

New Library World, vol. 110 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Susan E. Parker

The Morgan Library at Colorado State University in Fort Collins suffered catastrophic flooding as the result of a historic rain storm and flood that swept through the town…

Abstract

The Morgan Library at Colorado State University in Fort Collins suffered catastrophic flooding as the result of a historic rain storm and flood that swept through the town on July 28, 1997. This study examines this single library's organizational disaster response and identifies the phenomena that the library's employees cited as their motivation for innovation.

Purpose – This study provides an example of a library where a pre-disaster and post-disaster organizational environment was supportive of experimentation. This influenced the employees’ capacity and motivation to create a new tool meant to solve a temporary need. Their invention, a service now called RapidILL, advanced the Morgan Library organization beyond disaster recovery and has become an effective and popular consortium of libraries.

Design/methodology/approach – This is an instrumental case study. This design was chosen to examine the issues in organizational learning that the single case of Morgan Library presents. The researcher interviewed employees who survived the 1997 flood and who worked in the library after the disaster. The interview results and a book written by staff members are the most important data that form the basis for this qualitative research.

The interviews were transcribed, and key phrases and information from both the interviews and the published book were isolated into themes for coding. The coding allowed the use of NVivo 7, a text analysis software, to search in employees’ stories for “feeling” words and themes about change, innovation, motivation, and mental models.

Three research questions for the study sought to learn how employees described their lived experience, how the disaster altered their mental models of change, and what factors in the disaster response experience promoted learning and innovation.

Findings – This study investigates how the disruptive forces of disaster can influence and promote organizational learning and foster innovation. Analysis of the data demonstrates how the library employees’ feelings of trust before and following a workplace disaster shifted their mental models of change. They felt empowered to act and assert their own ideas; they did not simply react to change acting upon them.

Emotions motivate adaptive actions, facilitating change. The library employees’ lived experiences and feelings influenced what they learned, how quickly they learned it, and how that learning contributed to their innovations after the disaster. The library's supervisory and administrative leaders encouraged staff members to try out new ideas. This approach invigorated staff members’ feelings of trust and motivated them to contribute their efforts and ideas. Feeling free to experiment, they tapped their creativity and provided adaptations and innovations.

Practical implications – A disaster imposes immediate and often unanticipated change upon people and organizations. A disaster response urgently demands that employees do things differently; it also may require that employees do different things.

Successful organizations must become adept at creating and implementing changes to remain relevant and effective in the environments in which they operate. They need to ensure that employees generate and test as many ideas as possible in order to maximize the opportunity to uncover the best new thinking. This applies to libraries as well as to any other organizations.

If library leaders understand the conditions under which employees are most motivated to let go of fear and alter the mental models they use to interpret their work world, it should be possible and desirable to re-create those conditions and improve the ability of their organizations to tap into employees’ talent, spur innovation, and generate meaningful change.

Social implications – Trust and opportunities for learning can be central to employees’ ability to embrace change as a positive state in which their creativity flourishes and contributes to the success of the organization. When leaders support experimentation, employees utilize and value their affective connections as much as their professional knowledge. Work environments that promote experimentation and trust are ones in which employees at any rank feel secure enough to propose and experiment with innovative services, products, or workflows.

Originality/value – The first of its kind to examine library organizations, this study offers direct evidence to show that organizational learning and progress flourish through a combination of positive affective experiences and experimentation. The study shows how mental models, organizational learning, and innovation may help employees create significantly effective organizational advances while under duress.

An original formula is presented in Fig. 1.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-313-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Naresh Kumar Agarwal and Md Anwarul Islam

This paper aims to investigate how libraries prevent the loss of knowledge with people leaving or resigning, and the strategies they adopt to retain this knowledge and to…

4008

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how libraries prevent the loss of knowledge with people leaving or resigning, and the strategies they adopt to retain this knowledge and to transfer organizational knowledge to new employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 101 academic librarians from 35 countries in 6 continents who provided qualitative answers to two open-ended questions in a survey questionnaire.

Findings

Documentation, training and digital repositories were found to be the primary strategies used. A number of respondents admitted to retention and transfer being done poorly. Very few libraries had a formal knowledge management (KM) process. The study proposes a theoretical framework for knowledge retention and transfer in libraries.

Practical implications

Libraries will be able to learn of retention and transfer strategies, and identify gaps in their KM process based on the mapping of a specific strategy to knowledge dimension or phase of the KM cycle.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study in the area of knowledge retention in libraries. The study brings together the perspectives of libraries across the world. The primary research contribution is the theoretical framework which can be used to further research on knowledge retention and transfer in the context of libraries.

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2014

Shu Guo

This paper aims to investigate the practices of a well-established professional development committee (PDC) at an academic library to reveal the development of effective…

2549

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the practices of a well-established professional development committee (PDC) at an academic library to reveal the development of effective professional development programs with various themes and the diversified delivering formats and the assessment of library employees’ training needs and the effectiveness of professional development programs with Needs Assessment Surveys and Program Follow-up Employee Opinion Surveys. Professional development programs are widely adopted in academic libraries to support the professional growth of library employees and improve the quality of library services. Developing, promoting and administering professional development programs are main responsibilities of the PDC.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based upon the PDC’s recent practices since 2011. The Needs Assessment Surveys (in 2012 and 2013) are conducted electronically, so are the Opinion Surveys since 2013 which are formerly conducted in paper.

Findings

The well-planned professional development program themes with special designed delivery formats have demonstrated their effectiveness through high attendance of each professional development event. The positive results and high compliments from both Need Assessment Surveys and Opinion Surveys also endorse their values to employee’s professional growth.

Originality/value

This paper classifies various professional development program ideas into six program themes and three special delivery formats, and each is presented with intention, planning and organization. This paper also provides details of using different Need Assessment Surveys and Opinion Surveys for evaluation, which is also lacked in published literature.

Details

New Library World, vol. 115 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Sasekea Harris, Cheryl Folkes, Karen Tyrell and David Brown

In an experience economy, the alternative options for higher education are varied; resulting in competition and a deliberate focus on student experience to create…

Abstract

Purpose

In an experience economy, the alternative options for higher education are varied; resulting in competition and a deliberate focus on student experience to create competitive advantage. In this regard, the various constituents of the university, including the library, are required to transform the organisational culture, specifically, the service culture, to engage students in a way that creates a memorable experience. In response, The UWI, Mona Library re-launched its Customer Service programme: using an in-house inspired 10 element service model, with initiatives aimed at realising each element, the library purposed to build a service culture. This paper seeks to assess employees' perception of the impact of the initiatives of this model.

Design/methodology/approach

This survey research employed individual interviews to assess employees' perception of the impact of the initiatives of the service model, with the objective of refining the model, where needed, for continued use in the Mona Library, and for use in libraries desirous of implementing the model.

Findings

The initiatives of the service model are creating the desired customer service culture and aspects have been identified for refinement.

Research limitations/implications

The model is based on the needs, experiences, history, culture and strategic priorities of one Caribbean university library. It centres on the employees and their perception. As such, it focuses less on the product, space and the external customer; but it is hoped that by focusing on the employees (specifically creating a service culture amongst them) that this will ultimately impact product, space and the overall customer experience.

Practical implications

Provides the top priorities and considerations for a practicing Caribbean / developing country academic library manger, with an interest in a model for nurturing service culture amongst the employees.

Originality/value

This paper is of value as it centres on creating a service culture, rather than on the usual customer service satisfaction survey, offers a service model and adds to the literature on customer service in academic libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Kate‐Riin Kont and Signe Jantson

The aim of the current article is to clarify satisfaction of the staff of Estonian university libraries with the division of labor, work organization and coordination…

1530

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the current article is to clarify satisfaction of the staff of Estonian university libraries with the division of labor, work organization and coordination, existence of intra‐organizational career opportunities as well as with the fairness of salaries in view of the qualifications and responsibilities of university librarians in Estonia.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used in this paper are based on reviewing and summarizing of relevant literature to provide an overview of the concepts of performance and efficiency in general and in the context of the library as well as on results of the original study, created by the paper's authors, held in 2011/2012 in Estonian university libraries to determine the attitude of the libraries' staff towards division of labor and performance appraisal.

Findings

Although a number of Estonian university librarians were mostly satisfied with the division of labor within their departments, the respondents feel that duties in the library as a whole should be reorganized and workloads should be divided more equally. Librarians are relatively pessimistic about career opportunities within their libraries. The fact is that in Estonia, the predominantly women's jobs, such as teachers, librarians and nurses, are low‐paid. Therefore, as expected, the employees of university libraries are not satisfied with their salaries. However, librarians are capable and willing to work more and/or more intensively than they are currently allowed if that would bring about an increase in their salaries.

Originality/value

The majority of the literature in library science has focused – and rightfully so – on the user: what do users and patrons want and/or need, how do they use it, how can librarians best provide it to them, do the users feel themselves comfortable in library building etc., etc. Also, a fairly large number of studies have focused on finding relations between librarians' job satisfaction and performance output, but, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no research has been previously carried out in the Estonian library context to determine employees' attitudes towards their division of labor and coordination as well as librarians' intra‐organizational career opportunities and fairness of the salary.

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Umit Konya and Neslihan Gurel

Libraries need library leaders who are able to follow the changes and developments and keep pace with them, manage and shape the changes, bring theories and practices…

Abstract

Purpose

Libraries need library leaders who are able to follow the changes and developments and keep pace with them, manage and shape the changes, bring theories and practices together, be solution-oriented, people-oriented, environment-oriented, well-appointed, successful, and creative, because of the rapid developments and continuous changes. In this context, it has become more important for library managers to improve their leadership skills. In the scope of this study, a questionnaire study has been conducted with staff working in 168 different university central libraries. Information form, consisting of 16 questions about librarians’ demographic characteristics and manager satisfaction and Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire is used for data accumulation. The purpose of this paper is to determine library managers’ leadership approaches in private and public university libraries of Turkey and to survey library staff's satisfaction with their managers.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is a methodological and descriptive research. Original sample of this research consists of 168 university central library in total (103 public-65 private) and approximately 500 library employee 183 library employees from 20 public university central libraries (108 employees) and 13 private university central libraries responded. Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, so sample of this research consists of 33 libraries and 183 questionnaire answers. 20.62 percent of the library employees of the target group had responded the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire.

Findings

In total, 183 employees (108 public and 75 private university central libraries) from 33 university central libraries are responded to Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. Multiple responses were gained from 183 library employees of whom 57.4 percent (105) were female and 42.6 percent (78) were male. When the age distribution is concerned it has determined that 25.1 percent (46) of the participants were centered on 26-34 age group. Other age distributions are defined as in the following: ages 20-25, 19.7 percent (36); ages 31-35, 18.6 percent (34); ages 36-40, 13.7 percent (25); ages 41-45, 15.8 percent (29); and age 46 and over, 7.1 percent.

Originality/value

As with all organizations, library managers with leadership qualities are needed in the field of library science. Organizational structures of libraries are constantly changing. Libraries need library leaders who are able to follow the changes and developments and keep pace with them, manage and shape the changes, bring theories and practices together, be solution-oriented, people-oriented, environment-oriented, well-appointed, successful, and creative, because of the rapid developments and continuous changes.

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2008

James Castiglione

The purpose of this paper is to provide library administrators, library researchers and practitioners with an in‐depth review of the conceptual and practical tools…

2701

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide library administrators, library researchers and practitioners with an in‐depth review of the conceptual and practical tools required to engage the creative potential of their staff members.

Design /methodology/approach

The paper reviews the important concepts involving employee creativity and its successful management in the organizational setting. This is accomplished by reviewing the relevant literature assembled from the social, psychological, management, organizational and library sciences.

Findings

Intrinsic motivation is the primary driver of individual creativity and drives organizational learning, transformation and innovation. Library administrators are directly responsible for creating and sustaining an organizational culture that facilitates the intrinsic‐motivation of all library staff members. Organizational democracy and employee participation may increase and sustain intrinsic‐motivation while coercive management behaviors tend to reduce this vital catalyst.

Research limitations/implications

The preponderance of the literature consulted for this article was assembled from sources outside the field of library management. Therefore, library administrators who would use this information to enhance the creative activities of their employees are cautioned to develop small pilot‐phase projects to gain practical experience with the concepts contained in this paper.

Originality/value

The paper provides a useful review of the appropriate literature related to employee creativity. This paper is among the first to relate the concepts of intrinsic‐motivation, managerial style and creativity to organizational learning and transformation in the library environment.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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