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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Yalan Yan, Xi Zhang, Xianjin Zha, Tingting Jiang, Ling Qin and Zhiyuan Li

Digital libraries and social media are two sources of online information with different characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate self-efficacy into the…

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1464

Abstract

Purpose

Digital libraries and social media are two sources of online information with different characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate self-efficacy into the analysis of the relationship between information sources and decision making, and to explore the effect of self-efficacy on decision making, as well as the interacting effect of self-efficacy and information sources on decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected and the partial least squares structural equation modeling was employed to verify the research model.

Findings

The effect of digital library usage for acquiring information on perceived decision quality (PDQ) is larger than that of social media usage for acquiring information on PDQ. Self-efficacy in acquiring information (SEAI) stands out as the key determinant for PDQ. The effect of social media usage for acquiring information on PDQ is positively moderated by SEAI.

Practical implications

Decision making is a fundamental activity for individuals, but human decision making is often subject to biases. The findings of this study provide useful insights into decision quality improvement, highlighting the importance of SEAI in the face of information overload.

Originality/value

This study integrates self-efficacy into the analysis of the relationship between information sources and decision making, presenting a new perspective for decision-making research and practice alike.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2016

Norazah Mohd Suki

This paper aims to examine relationships between attitude, self-efficacy and subjective norm with library patrons’ behavioural intention to use public computing facilities…

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2147

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine relationships between attitude, self-efficacy and subjective norm with library patrons’ behavioural intention to use public computing facilities at a library.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 200 undergraduate students enrolled at a higher learning institution in the Federal Territory of Labuan, Malaysia, via a structured questionnaire comprising closed-ended questions. A structural equation modelling technique using Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS) computer software version 21 was used to examine the stability of the model with the data and to estimate impacts among factors instantaneously.

Findings

The results show that library patrons’ behavioral intention to use public computing facilities at the library is widely affected by subjective norm factor, i.e. influence of the support of family members, friends and neighbours. Using public computers in a library helps them to be more independent in completing their assignments and conducting research collaboration, checking email messages, social networking and performing other online tasks.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide a better understanding of factors likely to influence library patrons’ behavioral intention to use public computing facilities at a library. It also offers valuable insights into factors which university librarians need to focus on to improve library patrons’ behavioral intention to actively use public computing facilities at a library for quality information retrieval.

Originality/value

This study replaces perceived behavioral control with self-efficacy in the framework, as it overlaps with the concept of self-efficacy to provide more variance in behavioral intention to use public computing facilities at a library, which has been marginally researched in the Malaysian context.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Xianjin Zha, Wentao Wang, Yalan Yan, Jinchao Zhang and Daochen Zha

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents of information seeking in digital libraries from the perspectives of the Technology Acceptance Model and flow…

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1960

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the antecedents of information seeking in digital libraries from the perspectives of the Technology Acceptance Model and flow experience, as well as the consequences from the perspectives of self-efficacy in getting information and individual performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model is developed and tested using questionnaires and, partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The effect of flow experience on information seeking in digital libraries is the largest one. Meanwhile, flow experience fully mediates the effects of ease of use and usefulness on information seeking in digital libraries which further leads to self-efficacy in getting information and individual performance.

Practical implications

Librarians should help users to experience more stable and sustainable flow by providing dependable, prompt, personalized and professional service to them. Librarians should try their best to provide diversified user training so as to guide potential users to seek information in digital libraries.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the theoretical development of the structural model exploring information seeking in digital libraries, presenting a new view for digital library research and practice alike.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 67 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Eugene Okyere-Kwakye and Khalil Md Nor

Electronic library (E-library) is a form of computer mediated system that uses electronic media, such as Web/internet devices and distributes resources to improve on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Electronic library (E-library) is a form of computer mediated system that uses electronic media, such as Web/internet devices and distributes resources to improve on the quality of teaching and learning. Students’ use of e-library for learning is essential and as such the government has invested hugely into its subscription for several university libraries in Ghana. However, most university students feel reluctant to use the e-library resources for their studies. The purpose of this paper is therefore to examine the factors that influence students’ intention to use e-library resources for their studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire was used to collect data from 200 students from one Technical University in Ghana. Structural equation modeling (SmartPLS) was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study found that accessibility, attitude, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness and relevance to studies have positive significant effect on students’ attitude to use e-library. In addition, self-efficacy, subjective norm and attitude have positive significant influence on students’ intention to use e-library.

Research limitations/implications

Although the sample frame used for this study may be unique, but the total amount of data collected was limited to providing the general representative of the Ghanaian students in one particular university. Other researchers may consider collecting data from other universities to extend the sample frame for a larger sample size of students.

Practical implications

Academic administrators need to organize training and workshops on how to use the e-library portal for their search and other didactic assignments. Most importantly, students should be given IT or internet tutorials as foundation for the use of the e-library portal.

Social implications

Universities have to provide internet access such as hotspot and network routers at the labs, classrooms and other vantage points. It is believed that with these in place, adequate access to the internet would promote students’ engagement on the e-library facility.

Originality/value

The study examines the factors that influence students’ intention to use e-library resources for their studies in Ghana.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Khalid Mahmood

This paper systematically reviews the evidence of reliability and validity of scales available in studies that reported surveys of students to assess their perceived self…

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1775

Abstract

Purpose

This paper systematically reviews the evidence of reliability and validity of scales available in studies that reported surveys of students to assess their perceived self-efficacy of information literacy (IL) skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Search in two subject and two general databases and scanning of titles, abstracts and full texts of documents have been carried out in this paper.

Findings

In total, 45 studies met the eligibility criteria. A large number of studies did not report any psychometric characteristics of data collection instruments they used. The selected studies provided information on 22 scales. The instruments were heterogeneous in number of items and type of scale options. The most used reliability measure was internal consistency (with high values of Cronbach’s alpha), and the most used validity was face/content validity by experts.

Practical implications

The culture of using good-quality scales needs to be promoted by IL practitioners, authors and journal editors.

Originality/value

This paper is the first review of its kind, which is useful for IL stakeholders.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

Adefunke Sarah Ebijuwa and Iyabo Mabawonku

Undergraduates use electronic library resources for academic activities. However, literature has revealed that undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources is low…

Abstract

Purpose

Undergraduates use electronic library resources for academic activities. However, literature has revealed that undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources is low in Nigeria owing to attitude, computer literacy and information retrieval skills, while little attention was given to computer self-efficacy. This paper aims to examine computer self-efficacy as a predictor of undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources in federal universities in south-west Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive survey research design was adopted. Multi-stage sampling method was used to select 1,526 undergraduates from the population size of 30,516 from six federal universities in south-west Nigeria in four faculties (Arts, Engineering/ Technology, Science and Social sciences) and three departments from each of the faculties (English, History and Philosophy; Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering: Economics, Sociology and Psychology). Data were collected using a questionnaire and were analysed using descriptive statistics, mean and standard deviation, Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation, hierarchical and regression analyses at 0.05 level of significance.

Findings

There was a significant relationship between computer self-efficacy and use of electronic library resources (r = 0.13, p < 0.05). The result of the analysis showed that computer self-efficacy influenced undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources in federal universities in south-west Nigeria.

Research limitations/implications

The data for the research were obtained from undergraduates in the selected faculties in the six federal universities except for two faculties which did not have some departments that were common to the selected faculties.

Practical implications

The findings indicated that computer self-efficacy improves the use of electronic library resources for academic purposes. It therefore encourages the library management to provide the necessary support and training for the undergraduates to acquire the technical skills required for the acquisition of computer self-efficacy. This has greater influence on undergraduates’ ability to use the computer maximally to access electronic library resources for academic purposes.

Social implications

It will improve the undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources for academic purposes. This implies that the undergraduates will have access to information around the world that could be useful for development in and around their locality which will become easily accessible. Also, in this era of computer, it will encourage reading culture among undergraduates. This could inform policymakers on the need to provide more electronic library resources for libraries.

Originality/value

The study provides original data on computer self-efficacy as a predictor of undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources in federal universities in south-west Nigeria. This can provide valuable indicator for library managements considering enhanced utilisation of electronic library resources.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 68 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2020

Tessa Withorn, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Anthony Andora, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Maggie Clarke, George Martinez, Amalia Castañeda, Aric Haas and Wendolyn Vermeer

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

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6500

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2019.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 370 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Yingqi Tang and Hungwei Tseng

The purpose of this study is to investigate undergraduate student information self-efficacy to find out how much the students learned from library instruction classes and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate undergraduate student information self-efficacy to find out how much the students learned from library instruction classes and to determine whether information seeking skills can be developed with a library instruction class.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research method was conducted to collect survey data and to perform statistical analysis. A Web-based survey was distributed to undergraduate students who were enrolled in the Fall term of 2014. In all, 98 students completed the survey.

Findings

The study reported that undergraduate students’ capability of information finding, retrieving, analyzing, evaluating and presenting were on and above medium level (M = 3.40). They reported higher skills in information evaluation and information objects and types but lower skills in using catalog/database and organizing/synthesizing information. Students in the multiple library instruction group showed a significantly higher information self-efficacy. One-single instruction has a limited effect on improving information seeking skills.

Research limitations/implications

The number of students who participated in library instruction classes was relatively low. More data need to be collected to give credence to the findings in the future, and data collected from individual class would yield more accurate result.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on information literacy and library instruction. The findings suggest that information literacy instruction should go beyond the one-session mode and should offer hands-on practices that will foster students’ critical thinking behavior more effectively.

Details

Library Review, vol. 66 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Norazah Mohd Suki and Norbayah Mohd Suki

Successful information retrieval is determined by library patrons retrieving accurate, relevant, and up-to-date information stored in documents; this affects their self…

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2217

Abstract

Purpose

Successful information retrieval is determined by library patrons retrieving accurate, relevant, and up-to-date information stored in documents; this affects their self-efficacy, emotions, and behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of mastery experiences, self-evaluation, vicarious observation of others’ experiences, social feedback, and physiological state of library patrons’ emotions after information retrieval.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured close-ended questionnaire survey was utilized of which 200 responses were valid and usable for data analysis. Multiple regression analysis was executed to assess the influence of personal self-evaluation, comparisons with others, physiological state, and social feedback, on the library patrons’ emotions after information retrieval.

Findings

The findings of this study indicated that social feedback had the greatest influence on the library patrons’ emotions after information retrieval, followed by personal self-evaluation and physiological state.

Originality/value

This study employed quantitative research design utilizing multiple regression analysis which provides useful insight for university librarians on the specific factors that have significant effects on library patrons’ emotions after information retrieval. The outcomes add a new perspective to preceding studies on library patrons’ emotions after information retrieval, which has previously been inadequately researched in the Malaysian setting.

Details

Program, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

A. Nick Vera, Travis L. Wagner and Vanessa L. Kitzie

This chapter addresses the shortcomings of current self-efficacy models describing the health information practices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer…

Abstract

This chapter addresses the shortcomings of current self-efficacy models describing the health information practices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) communities. Informed by semi-structured interviews with 30 LGBTQIA+ community leaders from South Carolina, findings demonstrate how their self-efficacy operates beyond HIV/AIDS research while complicating traditional models that isolate an individual’s health information practices from their abundant communal experiences. Findings also suggest that participants engage with health information and resources in ways deemed unhealthy or harmful by healthcare providers. However, such practices are nuanced, and participants carefully navigate them, balancing concerns for community safety and well-being over traditional engagements with healthcare infrastructures. These findings have implications for public and health librarianship when providing LGBTQIA+ communities with health information. Practitioners must comprehend how the collective meanings, values, and lived experiences of LGBTQIA+ communities inform how they create, seek, share, and use health information to engage in successful informational interventions for community health promotion. Otherwise, practitioners risk embracing approaches that apply decontextualized, deficit-based understandings of these health information practices, and lack community relevance.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

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