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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Aleksandra Horvat

Prior to the recent establishment of the Training Centre for Continuing Education of Librarians, training of librarians in Croatia had been organized sporadically by…

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Abstract

Prior to the recent establishment of the Training Centre for Continuing Education of Librarians, training of librarians in Croatia had been organized sporadically by several organizations in the field. For the majority of librarians, however, professional education could have easily ended with diploma, because there has been no legal obligation to attend any form of further education. The first attempt to establish a consistent pattern of continuing education for librarians in the whole country was made when four major organizations in the library field, the National and University Library, Zagreb City Libraries, Croatian Library Association and Department of Information Sciences, Faculty of Philosophy, signed an agreement on the establishment of the Training Centre. The programme of the Centre was successfully launched in February 2002. However, further activities of the Centre might become seriously hampered by the lack of legal provision for continuing education that makes it difficult for librarians to obtain leave, lack of funding allocated in library budgets for the education, and the impossibility of relating professional development to professional promotion.

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New Library World, vol. 105 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Ti Yu

This study explores how Taiwanese college and technical institution libraries familiarize users with library facilities and information resources. Three relevant…

Abstract

This study explores how Taiwanese college and technical institution libraries familiarize users with library facilities and information resources. Three relevant literatures were reviewed to identify the general trends from the past. Questionnaires were distributed to 19 colleges and 50 technical institutions, 61 institutions responded. Various user education programs, implementation methods and evaluations were explored in the survey. Lists of common difficulties and the problems faced by library staff and their suggestions were profiled and compiled. Analyses based on the survey findings are made and suggestions centered on the analysis results are provided to interested fellow librarians in Taiwan.

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New Library World, vol. 104 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2005

Odin L. Jurkowski

Higher education, and in particular libraries, have changed significantly over the last decade due to the adoption of technological advancements such as the Internet and…

Abstract

Higher education, and in particular libraries, have changed significantly over the last decade due to the adoption of technological advancements such as the Internet and the World Wide Web. The multitude of ways patrons can interact with librarians and library resources has been only the latest step in a very long process which started with traditional snail mail and the phone. As educators, librarians have always been interested in using new tools to improve services. These services are increasingly being made available to patrons who do not physically enter a library building. This paper looks at what library services are currently being offered to students at a distance in order to better plan for the future.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-338-9

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Maria Haigh

The book is a mighty instrument for communication, labor, struggle. It arms a person with life experiences and the toils of humanity. It expands his horizons and gives him…

Abstract

The book is a mighty instrument for communication, labor, struggle. It arms a person with life experiences and the toils of humanity. It expands his horizons and gives him knowledge to tame the forces of nature.N.K. Krupskaya, wife of V.I. Lenin

This chapter examines historical developments and current trends in Ukrainian library education, based on a review of the Ukrainian literature, a survey of Library and Information (LIS) curricula, and conversations with senior figures in Ukrainian LIS education. Ukraine became an independent state only in 1991 after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Prior to independence, Ukraine's LIS education was integrated within the Soviet system. After independence the system evolved slowly, but with the recent Orange Revolution, reform efforts have increased apace. Ukrainian LIS education remains more vocational than in the United States, with a two-year nondegree certificate as the most common training, and a four-year bachelor's degree offered by elite institutions. One emerging trend in LIS education there stresses the new opportunities for librarians and information professionals because of Internet technologies. Another trend is part of a more general shift, inspired by a new Ukrainian higher education law, stressing the country's independent culture and formalizing standards for different degrees. Although Ukrainian LIS leaders advocate adoption of open access mechanisms, customer friendly practices, and electronic resources, my own experiences as a library user suggest that Soviet-era habits continue to shape library practices. LIS education has now reached a turning point as reformers grapple with the limited resources, the power of inertia, and remnants of Soviet culture in their efforts to meet current challenges and prepare a new generation of information professionals.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-710-9

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Mary Anne Kennan, Mary Carroll and Kim M. Thompson

Purpose – This chapter provides a historical overview of libraries and library and information science/studies (LIS) education in Australia, charting the changing nature…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter provides a historical overview of libraries and library and information science/studies (LIS) education in Australia, charting the changing nature of the LIS academy and the profession. The chapter then examines the knowledge, skills, and qualifications required for current and emerging LIS professionals, discussing how we embrace new knowledge and analyzing whether there are aspects of current LIS education that we need to hold on to or let go of in order to re-envision LIS education in the future.

Design/Methodology/Approach – A brief historical analysis of Australian librarianship, library associations, and LIS education, dating from European colonization in 1788 to the present, 2017, sets the context and informs the discussion.

Findings – This chapter demonstrates how social, political, technological, and educational forces have influenced libraries, librarianship, and LIS education. Within this context, we propose ways forward, such as partnering with broader information communities, adopting emerging specialties, building closer relationships between academia and practice, and considering “letting go” of some of the old as we add the new.

Originality/Value – By providing an original historical overview of librarianship in Australia with a particular focus on LIS education and how the goals and focus of both librarianship and LIS education have evolved over the centuries, this chapter contributes to an informed discussion designed to assist in re-envisioning the information professions and disciplines in the future.

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Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Rachel Ivy Clarke and Steven Bell

Purpose – As change creates more uncertainty for library practitioners, graduate library education needs to explore how best to prepare students to manage ambiguity…

Abstract

Purpose – As change creates more uncertainty for library practitioners, graduate library education needs to explore how best to prepare students to manage ambiguity through new approaches to identifying and solving challenging problems. We advocate for incorporating design into graduate library education.

Design/Methodology/Approach – First, we discuss the need for a design approach to librarianship. We then introduce the nature of design thinking and philosophy and discuss the ways in which it is already present in librarianship. We review past developments and recent trends with a special focus on the ways in which design thinking, methods, and philosophies are (or are not) incorporated into library and information science (LIS) education.

Findings – We synthesize these findings to propose recommendations and suggestions for an alternative degree program to the traditional Master of Library Science (MLS): the Master of Library Design (MLD). This includes the presentation of a new model of library education that blends design philosophy with traditional library science content.

Originality/Value – This is the first compilation in the library literature to propose the development of a new type of library degree that we refer to as the MLD; hence, it has a high level of originality. While the library literature has examples of practitioners applying design thinking to improve library services, this chapter’s value is that it promotes the integration of design thinking and philosophy more broadly in order to better equip future library professionals for a rapidly changing information landscape.

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Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

David Bawden, Polona Vilar and Vlasta Zabukovec

To determine and compare approaches to the education and training of librarians for work in digital libraries. More precisely, to identify – in general terms, rather than…

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Abstract

Purpose

To determine and compare approaches to the education and training of librarians for work in digital libraries. More precisely, to identify – in general terms, rather than specifically – the important competencies required by information professionals in creating and managing digital libraries, and in facilitating their use, and to assess how these competencies are treated in LIS education and training, and therefore how the capacities of the information professions are being developed.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature analysis of the skill sets required by librarians working with digital materials. Evaluation of formal education and of professional development programmes in the UK and in Slovenia, to assess how these needs are being met.

Findings

Both formal education and continuing development training are adapting to cover aspects of the digital library environment, both in the UK and in Slovenia. This is happening as part of the normal process of the redesign of degree programmes and of training courses. Digital library skills and knowledge – embodying conceptual, semantic, syntactic and technical aspects – are being included in existing courses, for the most part, rather than in entities labelled “digital library”. This approach has strengths and also weaknesses. While there is some agreement on core topics, there is much variation in how they are presented, and in the relative importance given to them.

Research limitations/implications

Based on comparison of education and training programmes in two countries, the UK and Slovenia.

Practical implications

Recommendations for curricula are made.

Originality/value

Provides an insight into education and training needs in a developing and important area.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2008

Linda C. Smith

Funding, first from foundations and later also from government agencies, has been a factor in shaping the development of education for library (and information) science in…

Abstract

Funding, first from foundations and later also from government agencies, has been a factor in shaping the development of education for library (and information) science in the U.S. for more than 80 years. Educational programs experienced substantial investments in three periods: (1) from the Carnegie Corporation in the 1920s and 1930s; (2) from the U.S. Office of Education in the 1960s and 1970s; and (3) from the Institute of Museum and Library Services in the first decade of the 21st century. This chapter documents the impacts of the first two and argues for the need to analyze the impact of the third. Other, more modest, investments from both foundations and government agencies have had less lasting impact. This chapter identifies the major sources of funding and projects funded, assesses the level and type of impact, and concludes with implications for the future. The focus is on funding for research, development, and resource enhancement in library (and information) science education, not research conducted by library and information science (LIS) faculty on other topics (e.g., as funded by the OCLC/ALISE library and information science research grant program) (Connaway, 2005).

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Influence of Funding on Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-373-6

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 1991

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-615-1

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Lynn C. Warner

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the ways in which bachelor’s degree programs in library and information studies can support and enhance Master of…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the ways in which bachelor’s degree programs in library and information studies can support and enhance Master of Library Science (MLS) and Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) programs.

Approach – The history of undergraduate library degrees is examined, followed by a brief discussion of the current landscape of library education. Finally, five ways in which library and information science (LIS) undergraduate programs can revitalize the MLS/MLIS are addressed and analyzed.

Findings – Bachelor of Science in Library Science degrees can impact the MLS/MLIS degree in five discrete ways. Undergraduate programs can interest student in future information work, allow for more specialization in graduate programs, allow paraprofessionals to advance their library education, support rural libraries, and can lead to more rigorous MLS/MLIS curricula.

Value – As libraries and library education are in transition, undergraduate LIS degree programs have the potential to transform LIS education as a whole.

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

Keywords

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