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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Kasthuri Anandasivam and Choy Fatt Cheong

Libraries are inevitably becoming both physical and virtual spaces due to the convergence of the traditional and the online environments today. Though the virtual library

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3250

Abstract

Purpose

Libraries are inevitably becoming both physical and virtual spaces due to the convergence of the traditional and the online environments today. Though the virtual library has been gaining much attention, the “library as a place” is still an important aspect of practical library management. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design, planning and implementation of the new Art, Media and Design Library at Nanyang Technological University to meet the needs and aspirations of a new generation of media savvy users.

Design/methodology/approach

A simple questionnaire was used to solicit feedback from staff and students on their impression of the new library during the initial opening period. This was followed up with face‐to‐face interviews with teaching staff.

Findings

This study has enabled some conclusions to be drawn on the interplay between library users and the physical environment, particularly on aesthetics, seating and availability of facilities. An important affirmation from the exercise is that aesthetics and good interior design play important roles in the positive perception of library users.

Originality/value

Librarians who are involved in the building and construction of small art libraries will find the paper useful in providing information and ideas on various aspects of library design and planning.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Anusha Lakmini Wijayaratne and Diljit Singh

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a library website model. Further, the paper discusses a designer’s checklist and an evaluative instrument that were constructed…

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1935

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a library website model. Further, the paper discusses a designer’s checklist and an evaluative instrument that were constructed based on the proposed model.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was developed through a Delphi study that was participated by two panels of experts. The researcher communicated with the panel members via e-mail using two Delphi instruments designed out of two item pools that were developed based on the knowledge gained from surveying the literature, visiting the selected libraries and exploring the library websites. Then, a designer’s checklist and an evaluative instrument were derived from the proposed model through a series of brainstorming sessions.

Findings

The proposed model consisted of altogether 140 items (60 web content elements and 80 web design features). The designer’s checklist comprises all 140 items, and the evaluative instrument comprises 60 content elements and 57 design features.

Research limitations/implications

This study has developed an academic library website model and derived two instruments based on the proposed model. Further studies are needed to customize, particularly, the web content pillar of this conceptual model, to meet the specific needs of different types of libraries including public libraries, special libraries, school libraries, etc.

Practical implications

The designer’s checklist and the evaluative instrument derived from the proposed model are useful tools for library professionals in designing, re-designing, maintaining and evaluating their library websites. The librarians may use these tools for both institutional and research purposes.

Originality/value

The model and the two instruments proposed by this study are unique in focus, origin, content and presentation.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Brigitte Bell and Terrance Luther Cottrell

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the impact that library interior design can have on patron satisfaction with library service offering, in light of…

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1308

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the impact that library interior design can have on patron satisfaction with library service offering, in light of cost concerns from both patrons and library managers alike.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides insight from library design researchers and the authors’ experiences with how to simultaneously design effective spaces and advocate for funding for construction and remodeling.

Findings

There are at least three major categories for the fiscal impact of design projects: large, medium and small scale. Research on design projects, however, ranges from the low 6 figures to over $50 million. This situation creates a case-by-case environment for library administrators looking for best practices.

Originality/value

No library is exactly like another, and no library’s patrons have similar fiscal tolerance for interior design proposals and build-out projects. This paper provides guidance for library administrator searching for more information on how to advocate for and begin the process of library interior design with an aim of increasing utility and functionality of spaces.

Details

The Bottom Line: Managing library finances, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2005

Lilia Pavlovsky

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and…

Abstract

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and reflect the cultural life within that organization. This is a study of how the “landscape” of a public library (“Library X”), as an information retrieval system, relates to the values of the people who created it. The efforts here are geared towards understanding the physical instantiation of institutional culture and, more specifically, institutional values as they are reflected through the artifact.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-338-9

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Kris Johnson

The aim of this chapter is to help library administrators understand the concept of Service Design, and to maintain that any consideration of the future of library spaces…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this chapter is to help library administrators understand the concept of Service Design, and to maintain that any consideration of the future of library spaces should begin with a service design focused approach.

Approach

The chapter is a combination of general review, literature review, case study, and conceptual paper. It focuses on describing the basics of the concept, highlighting essential resources for further understanding, highlighting service design specifically applied in libraries, and providing one case study of an academic library undergoing a master planning project utilizing the lens of Service Design. The chapter will conclude by emphasizing the importance of attaining an appropriate understanding and buy-in for the Service Design process by library administrators and staff in order for its effective implementation.

Practical implications

Practical implications to employing Service Design to library spaces are endless, and span that gamut from making smart decisions based on user input and evidence, to creating spaces and services that are relevant to library users. Employing a Service Design approach to library building projects helps administrators position themselves to advocate for needed technology and funding in the highly competitive resource arena. The ideas gleaned from this chapter can be applied in any library: academic, public, special, or school. The results will be different, because every library has a unique group of users, but the processes employed are the same.

Originality/value

Library literature related to Service Design is slim but slowly emerging. This chapter fills a gap in literature geared specifically to administrators as well as building design and redesign projects.

Details

The Future of Library Space
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-270-5

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2014

Matthew R. Griffis

This exploratory study, a Ph.D. dissertation completed at the University of Western Ontario in 2013, examines the materially embedded relations of power between library

Abstract

This exploratory study, a Ph.D. dissertation completed at the University of Western Ontario in 2013, examines the materially embedded relations of power between library users and staff in public libraries and how building design regulates spatial behavior according to organizational objectives. It considers three public library buildings as organization spaces (Dale & Burrell, 2008) and determines the extent to which their spatial organizations reproduce the relations of power between the library and its public that originated with the modern public library building type ca. 1900. Adopting a multicase study design, I conducted site visits to three, purposefully selected public library buildings of similar size but various ages. Site visits included: blueprint analysis; organizational document analysis; in-depth, semi-structured interviews with library users and library staff; cognitive mapping exercises; observations; and photography.

Despite newer approaches to designing public library buildings, the use of newer information technologies, and the emergence of newer paradigms of library service delivery (e.g., the user-centered model), findings strongly suggest that the library as an organization still relies on many of the same socio-spatial models of control as it did one century ago when public library design first became standardized. The three public libraries examined show spatial organizations that were designed primarily with the librarian, library materials, and library operations in mind far more than the library user or the user’s many needs. This not only calls into question the public library’s progressiveness over the last century but also hints at its ability to survive in the new century.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-744-3

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Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2011

Catherine Closet-Crane

The professional discourse on academic library planning and design is examined. A critical realist philosophical stance and a constructionist perspective constitute the…

Abstract

The professional discourse on academic library planning and design is examined. A critical realist philosophical stance and a constructionist perspective constitute the theoretical framework that, paired with Fairclough's methodology for critical discourse analysis, is used to examine the constitution of interpretative repertoires and of a discourse constructing the academic library as a learning place. The information commons, learning commons, and library designed for learning repertoires are described and the effects of discursive activity are analyzed. Three types of effects are presented: (1) the production by the LIS community of discourse on academic libraries of a sizable body of literature on the information commons and on the learning commons, (2) the construction of new types of libraries on the commons model proposed by Beagle, and (3) the metaphorization of the library as business. The study concludes that the existing discourse takes a facilities management perspective dominated by concerns with technology, equipment, and space requirements that does not address the physical, psychological, and environmental qualities of library space design. Consequently, it is suggested that architectural programming techniques should be used in library planning and design that consider the architectural features and environmental design factors contributing to the making of a place where learning is facilitated.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-014-8

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Diana K Wakimoto

– The purpose of this paper is to explore graphic design best practices and approval processes used by librarians.

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1248

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore graphic design best practices and approval processes used by librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used an online, qualitative survey to collect data on librarians’ design processes and best practices. The responses were reviewed to determine categories and themes of librarians’ design processes and best practices to gain an understanding of the state of graphic design in libraries.

Findings

The majority of the respondents reported that there were no formal guidelines, design committees or approval processes at their libraries. While some librarians were aware of and used graphic design best practices, many respondents were unsure of what constituted a best practice in graphic design.

Research limitations/implications

The paper was exploratory and the respondents cannot be said to be representative of all librarians and, therefore, generalizations to all librarians are not possible.

Practical implications

Findings may help librarians who assume design duties in their libraries in exploring best practices and discussing design approval processes.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few papers in the library science literature on graphic design as applied specifically to librarians. It increases our understanding of graphic design in libraries.

Details

New Library World, vol. 117 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Zhixian Yi

In the digital age, constant changes in libraries inform contemporary building design. An innovative library building design is a complicated process and can be viewed as…

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3032

Abstract

Purpose

In the digital age, constant changes in libraries inform contemporary building design. An innovative library building design is a complicated process and can be viewed as a continuous process of the use of tacit and explicit knowledge and innovative tools and approaches. Knowledge management (KM) can bring about the much needed innovation, and transform tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge. For the design of a library to be successful, it is necessary to apply KM to library building design. The purpose of this paper is to look at key change impacts, to explore how to manage knowledge in building design and to identify key design principles.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper looks at key change impacts, explores how to manage knowledge in library building design and pinpoints design principles.

Findings

This paper finds that KM can be vital to library building design, and it can be used in all stages: to examine the internal and external environments, transform tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge by using portals, and analyze existing and future issues and trends. When effectively used, KM will result in innovative design strategies and also will reduce the time and costs of the building design and plan processes. The main principles of library building design are flexibility, accessibility, safety and security, applicability, adaptability, efficiency, and sustainability.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful overview of how to manage knowledge in library building design and design principles.

Originality/value

The views, discussions, and suggestions will be of value to improve the effectiveness of library building design.

Details

Library Management, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Mary M. Somerville and Lydia Collins

Information commons were introduced into libraries in the early 1990s. Now universities are building library learning commons and campus learning spaces. This paper sets…

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5146

Abstract

Purpose

Information commons were introduced into libraries in the early 1990s. Now universities are building library learning commons and campus learning spaces. This paper sets out to present a participatory library (re)design approach for collaborative planning “for and with” faculty teachers, student learners, and campus stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Collaborative design (co‐design) employs user‐centric investigations to produce products, applications, and environments aimed at advancing learning, sustaining communication, and building relationships. Examples from California Polytechnic State University and San José State University in California, USA, suggest the efficacy of this inclusive, learner‐centered (re)design approach for library facilities, services, and systems.

Findings

Inviting and enabling user input from the start offers a fruitful planning approach in which campus librarians, stakeholders, and beneficiaries “learn their way” to appropriate library (re)design decisions. Also, user involvement in information gathering and interpretation activities initiates the interactive relationships necessary for continuous improvement.

Practical implications

Collaborative design (co‐design) yields sustained interaction with user beneficiaries and campus stakeholders. It changes how library staff members think and what they think about, concurrent with enhancing libraries' appeal and value.

Originality/value

In development since 2002, the highly participatory design approach reflects theoretical and applied insights from researchers in Europe, Australia, and North America who have worked with US library practitioners to develop user‐centric processes for advancing organizational learning and enhancing user efficacy. Its practical application to planning for library learning commons and learning spaces contributes to the small but important literature on user‐centered library (re)design.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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