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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Zhixian Yi

In the digital age, constant changes in libraries inform contemporary building design. An innovative library building design is a complicated process and can be viewed as…

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Abstract

Purpose

In the digital age, constant changes in libraries inform contemporary building design. An innovative library building design is a complicated process and can be viewed as a continuous process of the use of tacit and explicit knowledge and innovative tools and approaches. Knowledge management (KM) can bring about the much needed innovation, and transform tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge. For the design of a library to be successful, it is necessary to apply KM to library building design. The purpose of this paper is to look at key change impacts, to explore how to manage knowledge in building design and to identify key design principles.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper looks at key change impacts, explores how to manage knowledge in library building design and pinpoints design principles.

Findings

This paper finds that KM can be vital to library building design, and it can be used in all stages: to examine the internal and external environments, transform tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge by using portals, and analyze existing and future issues and trends. When effectively used, KM will result in innovative design strategies and also will reduce the time and costs of the building design and plan processes. The main principles of library building design are flexibility, accessibility, safety and security, applicability, adaptability, efficiency, and sustainability.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful overview of how to manage knowledge in library building design and design principles.

Originality/value

The views, discussions, and suggestions will be of value to improve the effectiveness of library building design.

Details

Library Management, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2005

Lilia Pavlovsky

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and

Abstract

It has been suggested that “space and artifacts constitute systems of communication which organizations build up within themselves” (Gagliardi, 1992a, b, p. vi) and reflect the cultural life within that organization. This is a study of how the “landscape” of a public library (“Library X”), as an information retrieval system, relates to the values of the people who created it. The efforts here are geared towards understanding the physical instantiation of institutional culture and, more specifically, institutional values as they are reflected through the artifact.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-338-9

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Ardis Hanson and John Abresch

Libraries can be seen as the collective identity of its employees engaged in providing a myriad of services to a community of patrons. Libraries can also exist in virtual…

Abstract

Purpose

Libraries can be seen as the collective identity of its employees engaged in providing a myriad of services to a community of patrons. Libraries can also exist in virtual settings, defined with descriptive parameters, described by a wider user group external to the library environment. The diverse nature of what constitutes libraries is illustrated by researchers, such as Marino and Lapintie (2015), who use the term “meta-meeting place” when describing its environs. Whatever model is used to describe contemporary libraries, the library environment usually has numerous needs and demands coming from a variety of stakeholders, from administrators to patrons. This chapter examines how we, as librarians, with users, co-construct library as both space and place.

Methodology/approach

We used a theoretical framework (social constructionism) to show how library identity is established by its users in the space planning process to address their needs and expectations and provided a case study of the main library at the University of South Florida.

Findings

We found that libraries are reflective of the vision and values of a diverse community and the social-political milieu in which they are housed. Librarians used a number of innovative methods and frames to create best/evidence-based practice approaches in space planning, re-envisioning library functions, and conducting outcomes/programmatic assessment. For librarians to create that sense of place and space for our users requires effective and open conversations and examination of our own inherent (and often unacknowledged) contradictions as to what libraries are or should be as enduring structures with evolving uses and changing users. For example, only a few of the studies focused on the spatial use and feel of libraries using new technologies or methodologies, such as social network analysis, discourse analysis, or GPS, to map the use of physical and virtual space.

Practical implications

First, new ways of working and engaging require reexamination of assessment and evaluation procedures and processes. To accomplish this, we must develop a more effective culture of assessment and to use innovative evaluation measures to determine use, user paths, and formal and informal groupings. Changes that affect patron and staff perceptions of library as place/third space may be difficult to assess using quantitative surveys, such as LibQual, that may not provide an opportunity for respondents to provide specifics of what “place” means to them. Second, it is important to have effective communication among all members of the library (patrons, library staff, and university administration) so that we design spaces/places that enhance the relationships among users, technology, pedagogy, and learning spaces, not just the latest “thing” in the literature.

Originality/value

This value of this review is to provide a social constructionist perspective (frame) on how we plan library space. This approach provides opportunities to truly engage our patrons and administration in the co-construction of what “our library” should be since it provides insight to group, place, and social dynamics.

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Henrik Jochumsen, Casper Hvenegaard Rasmussen and Dorte Skot‐Hansen

The aim of this paper is to present a model for the public library created by the authors.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present a model for the public library created by the authors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is divided into three parts. The first part emphasizes considerations regarding today's focus on both the virtual and the physical library. The second part describes the four‐space model, including examples of libraries as illustrations of the different spaces and examples of how the model is being used in the Nordic library‐world. The third part pinpoints some critical questions in relation to the model.

Findings

The paper shows how the four‐space model has been used in different ways in the Nordic countries since it was presented for the first time in a Danish report on public libraries in 2010.

Practical implications

The four‐space model can be a useful tool in relation to developing, building, designing, arranging and rearranging public libraries. Furthermore the model can be a tool for management and communication in connection with library plans and policy and not least a point of departure for the discussion of the public library's overall role in society.

Originality/value

This is the first time that the space model is presented to the library world outside the Nordic countries in a way where examples, usability and limitations are included.

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Jeffrey Pomerantz and Gary Marchionini

The purpose of this paper is to present a high‐level investigation of the physical‐conceptual continuum occupied by both digital and physical libraries.

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10045

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a high‐level investigation of the physical‐conceptual continuum occupied by both digital and physical libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework is provided for thinking about the notions of place and library. The issue of materials and the ideas they represent is considered. Places for people are considered, including issues of people's sense of place in physical and digital spaces. The issue of physical and digital spaces as places for work, collaboration, and community‐building is considered.

Findings

As more digital libraries are built, and as more physical libraries offer electronic access to parts of their collection, two trends are likely to result: the role of the library as a storage space for materials will become decreasingly important; and the role of the library as a space for users, for individual and collaborative work, and as a space for social activity, will become increasingly important.

Research limitations/implications

Digital libraries are unable to fulfill some of the functions of the physical library as physical spaces, but are able to offer functions beyond what the physical library can offer as cognitive spaces.

Practical implications

Areas of likely future development for digital libraries are suggested, as vehicles for enhancing cognitive space by augmenting representations of ideas in materials.

Originality/value

This paper argues that in many ways digital libraries really are places in the conceptual sense, and will continue to broaden and enrich the roles that libraries play in people's lives and in the larger social milieu.

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Carla Corroto

Taking Community Design Centers (CDC) in the USA as case studies, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of a type of service learning increasingly found…

Abstract

Purpose

Taking Community Design Centers (CDC) in the USA as case studies, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of a type of service learning increasingly found in colleges of architecture. Typically, the CDC is a model of architecture's civic engagement that makes claims to “give back” to under-served communities and enhance student learning with applied architectural design work.

Design/methodology/approach

This project is part of a long-term engagement as participant observer and ethnographer in the field of architecture. Fieldwork in this investigation is presented as four case studies in separate and specific contexts.

Findings

Initial findings suggest there are conflicting intentions and aspirations at work through service learning in architecture and its implementation calls into question who or what is served. The author argues architecture's epistemology, pedagogical structure, and ideology precludes effective civic engagement.

Originality/value

The value of this research is the understanding of how those with power and resources are able to frame their work in low-income communities as service, even though there is little of worth given. It also demonstrates how stratification is reinforced through institutional arrangements in the USA.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2005

Gloria J. Leckie and Lisa M. Given

The history of the public library is long and rich, and continues to reflect this institution's initial mission: to respond to the needs of an evolving democratic society…

Abstract

The history of the public library is long and rich, and continues to reflect this institution's initial mission: to respond to the needs of an evolving democratic society. From its early days as a subscription service for the middle-class, through its evolution to become an educational site for the lower-classes and new immigrants, the public library has served as a touch-stone for urban industrial society in North America (Lerner, 1998, p. 138; Shera, 1974). Over the past century, public libraries have evolved to respond to the growing needs of the communities they serve and continue to do so with recent advances in technologies (such as DVDs, electronic books, the Internet, etc.), and with a more global outlook on the ways that people seek and share information. Indeed, the public library's constituents today are exceedingly diverse, including children and adults from a broad range of socio-economic, cultural, and educational backgrounds, all of whom seek information for a variety of personal and work-related purposes. The fact that public libraries have been fulfilling patrons' information needs for well over a century is a testament to their enduring success and versatility as information providers, and also points to the overall effectiveness of public librarians as intermediaries in the provision process.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-629-8

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Małgorzata Fedorowicz-Kruszewska

The purpose of this paper is to explain the concepts related to environmental education in the context of sustainable development, to indicate the links between them as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the concepts related to environmental education in the context of sustainable development, to indicate the links between them as well as to identify and organize elements of library activities that have the potential to implement environmental education.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of analysis and criticism of scientific and professional literature and research reports was used. The multiple case study method was also used.

Findings

An analysis of literature and multiple case studies confirms the assumption that sustainable development is now a new paradigm of librarianship. Among the goals of sustainable development are environmental goals, which in libraries can be achieved through environmental education. A broad approach to environmental education has been proposed, which is implemented not only by using library services but also by building green collections, contacts with environmentally involved librarians, using ecological library infrastructure, observing sustainable management methods in libraries, cooperation between the library and the external environment in terms of the natural environment.

Research limitations/implications

An analysis of 20 case studies was carried out regarding the implementation of pro-environmental measures in libraries. Examination of a larger number of case studies would probably give a more complete picture of this area of activity in libraries. The next stage of research should be the development of standards/guidelines in the field of environmental education in libraries, and then the development of methods and techniques for assessing the quality of library activities in this area and methods for assessing the impact of libraries on society and the environment in the field of environmental education.

Practical implications

The paper indicates – based on case study analyses – those library elements that have potential in the field of environmental education. They were ordered in categories that were assigned to the three main components of a library: people, artefacts and processes.

Social implications

Sustainable development is a new library paradigm. The paper focuses on the environmental area, specifically environmental education. It has been recognized that libraries have considerable potential for environmental education and should be seen as socially responsible organizations that take responsibility for the impact of their decisions and actions on society and the environment.

Originality/value

The paper explains the basic concepts of environmental education and the relationships between them. It defines the area of environmental education in libraries in terms of library activity elements that can be used to organize them according to the three main components of a library, which are people, artefacts and processes. The paper also indicates that sustainable development should be treated as a new paradigm of librarianship, and environmental education as a new research field of library and information science.

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Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2004

Diantha Schull

In recent years there has been growing discussion in the library community regarding the civic role of the public library. The discussion is rooted in a deep-seated…

Abstract

In recent years there has been growing discussion in the library community regarding the civic role of the public library. The discussion is rooted in a deep-seated professional commitment to the value of the public library as an institution of democratic society. As a recent president of the American Library Association, Nancy Kranich, wrote in 2001, “Libraries serve the most fundamental ideals of our society as uniquely democratic institutions. As far back as the nineteenth century, libraries were hailed as institutions that schooled citizens in the conduct of democratic life.” (p. vi).

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-005-0

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Polona Vilar and Primož Južnič

The purpose of this paper is to present a study of attitudes displayed towards the Central Humanist Library (CHL) from the perspective of both undergraduate and graduate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a study of attitudes displayed towards the Central Humanist Library (CHL) from the perspective of both undergraduate and graduate students as well as librarians, specifically in light of the proposed relocation and merging of the library, which consists of 18 separate departments and is currently scattered across two locations. It is proposed that bringing all of the departments into a single building would enable a number of positive key changes, such as cost reduction (in terms of single premises), communication and cooperation between departments, as well as various other process and service improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of different techniques were employed to obtain and analyse various sets of data, depending on the target group: student responses were obtained through web surveys, focus groups and interviews, with data being extracted and analysed through descriptive analysis; librarians’ responses were obtained through interviews, with data being extracted and an analysis driven through content analysis.

Findings

The CHL has traditionally been a place with a lack of space and a focus on traditional library services (i.e. loan of printed materials). Other more technological aspects of library and information services are fulfilled by nearby resources, including public libraries and alternative university libraries. It is also worth noting that there is a stark difference in the perceptions of the CHL between students of the Social Sciences and the more traditional Humanities. Responses from librarians pointed towards the fact that many feel reluctant towards change.

Research limitations/implications

As this study has only focused on three categories of end user, it should be noted that responses from faculty, researchers and doctoral students will be obtained in a separate research study, to enable a broader picture to be formed.

Practical implications

As this research focused on the present library and current information needs of the students within different study programmes, planning should not be based on the present situation, but rather take account of future predictions and needs. It is suggested, therefore, that the following is also undertaken to assist future projects and provide further insight: informing students and librarians of findings; systematic weeding; and, as noted above, further investigation of other stakeholders, e.g. researchers, doctoral students, faculty and management.

Originality/value

There is minimal information surrounding the attitudes of users and staff within the CHL – it is proposed that the findings of this study will assist in decisions regarding the renovation of newly acquired premises, and the subsequent relocation and reorganization of the existing library, staff, collections and services.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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