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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Abid Hussain

Industry 4.0 is a term for the so-called Fourth Industrial revolutions. It is the technological integration of cyber-physical systems (CPS) in the process of production…

Abstract

Purpose

Industry 4.0 is a term for the so-called Fourth Industrial revolutions. It is the technological integration of cyber-physical systems (CPS) in the process of production. CPS enables internet-based process networking with all participants in the process of value creation. The industrial revolution is actually changing how we live, work and communicate. Many trades have highly been affected by 4IR, libraries are one of them. The libraries of twenty-first century are shifting their paradigms from traditional setup to modern information networking. As people and machines are connecting to each other at enormous speed, artificial intelligence, mobile computing, machine learning and automation of every trade have become a need of the day. Automation and artificial intelligence are change agents in 4IR that will make certain groups of employees redundant, replacing them with new workers with the needed skills or with machines that do the job cheaper. This paper aims to shed light on how the 4IR will “shape the future of education, gender, work and library services”. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the challenges being faced by the library and librarians in the age of Industrial 4.0 revolution in contemporary society. The purpose of this study is to review the past literature on Industrial Revolutions 4.0 in education and interlink them with Library services.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study performs a systematic and content-centric review of literature relevant to library services. The literature of this study is based on a six-stage approach to identify the design principles and technology trends of 4IR in education and Library services.

Findings

Industry 4.0 Revolution is the current trend of revolutionary technology, which has affected many services in this age of globalization. Similar, Library services have highly been affected by 4IR. An effort has been made to highlight the vari-ous challenges being faced by libraries and librarians in this age of information. Some solutions have been presented to the library professionals to overcome this technology to boost its services up to the entire satisfaction of the patrons.

Research limitations/implications

The strategic approach in this study can serve the academicians and practitioners in the field of librarianship as a stepping stone to develop a successful transition from traditional manufacturing into the industry 4.0.

Originality/value

The study is among the first to identify the challenges being faced by libraries and librarians in this age of Industrial revolutions.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Sai Deng and Terry Reese

The purpose of this paper is to present methods for customized mapping and metadata transfer from DSpace to Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), which aims to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present methods for customized mapping and metadata transfer from DSpace to Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), which aims to improve Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) work flow at libraries using DSpace to store theses and dissertations by automating the process of generating MARC records from Dublin Core (DC) metadata in DSpace and exporting them to OCLC.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses how the Shocker Open Access Repository (SOAR) at Wichita State University (WSU) Libraries and ScholarsArchive at Oregon State University (OSU) Libraries harvest theses data from the DSpace platform using the Metadata Harvester in MarcEdit developed by Terry Reese at OSU Libraries. It analyzes certain challenges in transformation of harvested data including handling of authorized data, dealing with data ambiguity and string processing. It addresses how these two institutions customize Library of Congress's XSLT (eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) mapping to transfer DC metadata to MarcXML metadata and how they export MARC data to OCLC and Voyager.

Findings

The customized mapping and data transformation for ETD data can be standardized while also requiring a case‐by‐case analysis. By offering two institutions' experiences, it provides information on the benefits and limitations for those institutions that are interested in using MarcEdit and customized XSLT to transform their ETDs from DSpace to OCLC and Voyager.

Originality/value

The new method described in the paper can eliminate the need for double entry in DSpace and OCLC, meet local needs and significantly improve ETD work flow. It offers perspectives on repurposing and managing metadata in a standard and customizable way.

Details

New Library World, vol. 110 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library house‐keeping processes…

Abstract

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library house‐keeping processes, principally in the UK. It is edited and substantially written by the Information Officer for Library Automation based in Southampton University Library and supported by a grant from the British Library Research and Development Department. Copyright for VINE articles rests with the British Library Board, but opinions expressed in VINE do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the British Library. The subscription for VINE is £17 per annum and the period runs from January to December.

Details

VINE, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Robin Yeates

An institutional repository is the collective intellectual output of an institution recorded in a form that can be preserved and exploited. This article briefly outlines…

Abstract

An institutional repository is the collective intellectual output of an institution recorded in a form that can be preserved and exploited. This article briefly outlines the need for repositories such as Dspace, their role, benefits and drawbacks. It concludes that repositories are key to the ability of institutions to respond to future needs for more dynamic cross‐boundary communications services.

Details

VINE, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1978

This issue of VINE is an annotated cumulative index to all the major articles which have appeared in VINEs 1–22. Additional copies are available free of charge from the…

Abstract

This issue of VINE is an annotated cumulative index to all the major articles which have appeared in VINEs 1–22. Additional copies are available free of charge from the VINE Office. The index will be updated from time to time.

Details

VINE, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Anne Petry‐Eberle and Monika Bieg

The purpose of this paper is to present the systematic redevelopment of a Corporate Information Center's strategy, with particular focus on the aspect of outsourcing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the systematic redevelopment of a Corporate Information Center's strategy, with particular focus on the aspect of outsourcing services. This aspect is emphasised, because it is the only way to realise a new business model without an increase in resources.

Design/methodology/approach

There is a description of which services have been outsourced, while it is also made clear which activities related to the creation of processes and their supervision have remained in the company's internal Information Center, and how they are changing as time goes on. The licensing of information sources from external aggregators is viewed in the context of outsourcing, as is the latest development in Vendor Portfolio Management.

Findings

After the transformation of the classic spectrum of library services into the strategically created portfolio of an Online Information Center, the core tasks at the forefront are those which anchor the Information Center in the corporation of which it is a part, and which perfectly combine the interests of the corporation with the use of information industry competencies through cooperation and partnership with service providers.

Originality/value

The case study demonstrates how, and for what purpose, information industry competencies can be used in an Online Information Center. Even with limited resources, the skilful use of outsourcing solutions makes possible the redevelopment of strategy and therefore change.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Rose Sliger Krause, Andrea Langhurst Eickholt and Justin L. Otto

The purpose of this paper is to describe the music performance collection preserved in Eastern Washington University’s institutional repository (IR). This collection of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the music performance collection preserved in Eastern Washington University’s institutional repository (IR). This collection of recordings of student music performances is the result of an ongoing collaboration between the university?s library and music department, which serves to provide discoverability, preservation and access to a collection of student creative works, which had heretofore been a hidden collection.

Design/methodology/approach

This collection of student creative work was identified as a suitable project for the Eastern Washington University’s IR while it was still in the planning stages because it was identified as an existing need that the new IR could address. Much of the groundwork for the collaboration between the library and music department was completed prior to IR implementation. Thus, the library was ready to begin work on this collection once the IR was operational.

Findings

The student music performance collection has been a successful project for the IR, which benefits the music department by making student performances discoverable and accessible, and benefits the library by providing the opportunity to demonstrate that the then-new IR could support the university’s student-centered focus on teaching and learning.

Originality/value

While there is a growing body of literature on IRs emphasizing student work, there is little literature on music or other creative works’ collections in IRs, much less on creative works by students. This paper adds to the limited body of literature on student creative works in the IR by describing the development, implementation and lessons learned from the successful music performances collection.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library housekeeping processes…

Abstract

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library housekeeping processes, principally in the UK. It is edited and substantially written by Tony McSean, Information Officer for Library Automation based in Southampton University Library and supported by a grant from the British Library Research and Development Department. Copyright for VINE articles rests with the British Library Board, but opinions expressed in VINE do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the British Library. The subscription to VINE is £10 per year and the subscription period runs from January to December.

Details

VINE, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Patrick OBrien, Kenning Arlitsch, Jeff Mixter, Jonathan Wheeler and Leila Belle Sterman

The purpose of this paper is to present data that begin to detail the deficiencies of log file analytics reporting methods that are commonly built into institutional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present data that begin to detail the deficiencies of log file analytics reporting methods that are commonly built into institutional repository (IR) platforms. The authors propose a new method for collecting and reporting IR item download metrics. This paper introduces a web service prototype that captures activity that current analytics methods are likely to either miss or over-report.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were extracted from DSpace Solr logs of an IR and were cross-referenced with Google Analytics and Google Search Console data to directly compare Citable Content Downloads recorded by each method.

Findings

This study provides evidence that log file analytics data appear to grossly over-report due to traffic from robots that are difficult to identify and screen. The study also introduces a proof-of-concept prototype that makes the research method easily accessible to IR managers who seek accurate counts of Citable Content Downloads.

Research limitations/implications

The method described in this paper does not account for direct access to Citable Content Downloads that originate outside Google Search properties.

Originality/value

This paper proposes that IR managers adopt a new reporting framework that classifies IR page views and download activity into three categories that communicate metrics about user activity related to the research process. It also proposes that IR managers rely on a hybrid of existing Google Services to improve reporting of Citable Content Downloads and offers a prototype web service where IR managers can test results for their repositories.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Marianne A. Buehler and Marcia S. Trauernicht

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the initial transformation of one academic library's digital media library into the institutional repository (IR) of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the initial transformation of one academic library's digital media library into the institutional repository (IR) of its entire academic organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a description of an academic digital library's evolution into an institutional repository, accompanied by both practical and philosophical analyses.

Findings

Materials supporting an academic institution's scholarship (from colleges and from supporting organizations on campus) can play an important part in the success of an institutional repository. Standards for metadata content, data structures and hierarchies of collections must be followed consistently, and adequate storage for digital media within an institutional repository is necessary to have in advance of anticipated demand for the smooth operation of the IR and continued access to materials. Gray areas between the role of an institutional repository and the role of that organization's archives need to be addressed in the future.

Practical implications

Academic libraries can be highly successful in producing an institute repository by developing relationships with various organizations on campus in addition to the academic programs. Maintaining standards throughout the IR is crucial to future growth in an organized and consistent manner. Philosophical considerations of the role of the IR should be addressed in the beginning stages of the development of the IR for eliminating confusion and duplication of its contents with other campus organizations.

Originality/value

This paper describes the development of a digital library, created and maintained by an academic library, and its gradual change into a de facto institutional repository. Other libraries in the planning stages or initial steps of creating a campus‐wide digital library or an institutional repository can benefit from the description of possible successes and problems that they could encounter during implementation.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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