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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Margarita Moreno and Anne Xu

This paper aims to describe the role of the National Library of Australia in the Australian interlibrary loan environment, not just in terms of providing access to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the role of the National Library of Australia in the Australian interlibrary loan environment, not just in terms of providing access to National Library collections through the document supply service, but also in providing infrastructure to support interlibrary loans across Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the various roles the National Library plays in the interlibrary loan/document delivery environment in Australia. It covers the document supply service and the Libraries Australia service, which provides the infrastructure that supports interlibrary loans/document delivery in Australia, and briefly reports on the evaluation of services currently being undertaken.

Findings

Providing access to library collections is complex and constantly changing. Client expectations are increasing, and libraries need to change traditional practices to meet user needs.

Originality/value

The paper covers the services offered by the National Library of Australia in supporting interlibrary loans/document delivery. Very few papers cover this topic.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Karen L. Blank

Technology is an integral part of library functions in Australia. The development of a national bibliographic network, of local and regional cooperation, integrated library

Abstract

Technology is an integral part of library functions in Australia. The development of a national bibliographic network, of local and regional cooperation, integrated library systems, telecommunications, and online systems, as well as usage of microcomputers, ergonomics, copyright issues, and national information policy are all discussed. Additionally, the ambitious information technology plans of the Parliamentary Library of Australia are described.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

Dorothy G. Peake

The author explains that both the 14.5 million population and the distance which Australia is from major publishing centres may account for the enthusiasm for new…

Abstract

The author explains that both the 14.5 million population and the distance which Australia is from major publishing centres may account for the enthusiasm for new technology. Libraries in Australia were early users of minicomputers. A feature of these developments has been the growth in the country's telecommunications culminating in the introduction of MIDAS in 1979 and the use of online databases via Lockheed, SDC and OCLC. Access to databases within Australia is now achieved through AUSINET and CSIRONET. This has promoted library automation, which is here dealt with in three phases — Phase I relates to punched‐card systems; Phase II is characterised by the introduction of AUSMARC in 1971 and the establishment of the Australian MARC record service — under this phase are described the developments in systems for acquisitions, cataloguing, data entry, circulation control, and serials receipts; Phase III covers the shared systems and cooperative networks. The article ends by briefly surveying the future which seems largely dependent on the success of the National Library of Australia's development programme for hardware and software to provide a nationwide service.

Details

Program, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

David Ong, David Reid and Natasha Simons

This article seeks to provide an update of two papers presented to the VDX Users Group of Australia and New Zealand during 2006. It aims to explore the issues associated…

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to provide an update of two papers presented to the VDX Users Group of Australia and New Zealand during 2006. It aims to explore the issues associated with the implementation of Trans Tasman Interlending and its subsequent success, and is written primarily from a technical perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part describes the issues addressed, processes used and resolutions adopted in the period leading up to the go‐live of Trans Tasman Interlending. The second part provides a review of the first six months of operation.

Findings

Trans Tasman Interlending has produced interesting results and is clearly more significant for interlending in New Zealand than it is Australia. This article looks at a variety of result areas and delves into the issues the linked service has highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

While both countries have based their analysis on readily available report data, it is only in the Australian context that a formalised user survey was used. New Zealand reporting relies more on anecdotal evidence.

Practical implications

In highlighting the issues involved in linking two utilities this article potentially provides a checklist for others to follow and a yardstick against which to measure success.

Originality/value

Trans Tasman Interlending is a first for the linking of two national interlending utilities.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Roxanne Missingham and Tony Boston

This paper seeks to report on the development of a new interface for “finding” and “getting” resources from Australian libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report on the development of a new interface for “finding” and “getting” resources from Australian libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The National Library of Australia has provided online access to the Australian National Bibliographic Database since 1981. Containing the National Union Catalogue for Australia, its major role initially was to support shared cataloguing. The Kinetica service supports access to the database through its search service. Kinetica is being redeveloped over the period 2004 and 2005 to provide a more modern, standards‐based service. The development is focused on increasing access by Australians to the nation's collections. The new interface for searching, Libraries Australia, was launched in December 2004 and incorporates a Google‐style search interface with a range of new “get” functionality, enabling requesting from libraries and ordering from bookshops. The paper reports on the redevelopment project, particularly Libraries Australia.

Findings

The new interface is found to more successfully meet the needs of searchers, particularly the general public.

Originality/value

Summarises research undertaken to assess the needs of Australians for access to library collections. Also describes the technical architecture of the new search service and future directions for this national infrastructure for resource sharing in Australia. Issues for the future including universal access are identified.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Brendan Fitzgerald, Wayne Hawkins, Tom Denison and Tegan Kop

This chapter looks at Australian public libraries and how they have developed and delivered inclusive service to people with disabilities over the past decade or so. As…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter looks at Australian public libraries and how they have developed and delivered inclusive service to people with disabilities over the past decade or so. As digital technology impacts the public library sector the question of “how are libraries responding?” emerges, especially for the one in five Australians living with disabilities. This chapter is focused on how the public library network is delivering digitally inclusive services to people with disabilities.

Methodology/approach

The approach was to examine the international obligations, related governance, and professional standards that apply to Australian Public libraries; the current disability and digital inclusion related research from the past decade; and highlight some of the better examples of practice in Australian public library service.

Findings

This chapter is not a comprehensive examination but rather a summary scan of digital inclusion practice. However, it raises a number of questions for further investigation: research as to how these obligations are put into practice; how they can be better shared and learnt from; and more importantly how the aspiration of “inclusion for all” is being met.

Details

Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities and the Inclusive Future of Libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-652-6

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Mary Anne Kennan, Mary Carroll and Kim M. Thompson

Purpose – This chapter provides a historical overview of libraries and library and information science/studies (LIS) education in Australia, charting the changing nature…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter provides a historical overview of libraries and library and information science/studies (LIS) education in Australia, charting the changing nature of the LIS academy and the profession. The chapter then examines the knowledge, skills, and qualifications required for current and emerging LIS professionals, discussing how we embrace new knowledge and analyzing whether there are aspects of current LIS education that we need to hold on to or let go of in order to re-envision LIS education in the future.

Design/Methodology/Approach – A brief historical analysis of Australian librarianship, library associations, and LIS education, dating from European colonization in 1788 to the present, 2017, sets the context and informs the discussion.

Findings – This chapter demonstrates how social, political, technological, and educational forces have influenced libraries, librarianship, and LIS education. Within this context, we propose ways forward, such as partnering with broader information communities, adopting emerging specialties, building closer relationships between academia and practice, and considering “letting go” of some of the old as we add the new.

Originality/Value – By providing an original historical overview of librarianship in Australia with a particular focus on LIS education and how the goals and focus of both librarianship and LIS education have evolved over the centuries, this chapter contributes to an informed discussion designed to assist in re-envisioning the information professions and disciplines in the future.

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Margaret Henty Colin Steele

A survey was conducted in the second half of 1987 as to the state of automated systems in major Australian tertiary national and state libraries. An almost 100% response…

Abstract

A survey was conducted in the second half of 1987 as to the state of automated systems in major Australian tertiary national and state libraries. An almost 100% response rate has enabled a comprehensive overview to be obtained. The survey proves that Australia has many similarities to other countries such as the United Kingdom and the United States, notably in the increasing purchase by institutions of integrated proprietary systems. Trends in commercial vendor success and related issues are discussed. Clearly in many instances such trends for Australia also set a pattern for other Australasian countries.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Colin Steele

Developments in document supply in Australia in the five years following the Library Association of Australia's 1980 national interlending conference are surveyed. Little…

Abstract

Developments in document supply in Australia in the five years following the Library Association of Australia's 1980 national interlending conference are surveyed. Little progress seemed to have been made, apart from the development of the Australian Bibliographic Network, by the time of the second interlending conference in 1983. Six resolutions from this conference were considered in the LAA's National Plan for Document Supply and Delivery. A Document Delivery Conference was called in November 1984 to discuss reactions to the plan, and a working party was formed to progress the Conference's recommendations. The working party's final report is due shortly, and indications are that the National Library of Australia is set to assume a major role in interlibrary lending.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Toby Burrows

The humanities are facing considerable difficulties and pressures in Australian universities, as staff numbers fall and research funds shrink. Despite this, various…

Abstract

The humanities are facing considerable difficulties and pressures in Australian universities, as staff numbers fall and research funds shrink. Despite this, various innovative projects, aimed at creating electronic versions of texts and other cultural materials, are currently in progress. A range of different cultural institutions is involved, though the university and state libraries are the most active participants. Funding for such projects is difficult to come by, and the future looks somewhat uncertain. If a more coordinated and coherent approach to building digital libraries is to succeed in Australia, researchers and cultural institutions will need to work together to establish the appropriate financial and organizational frameworks.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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