Search results

1 – 10 of 205
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Judith A. Downie

The purpose of this paper is to foster discussion of the role of government information librarians in the design and implementation of information literacy instruction…

Downloads
1035

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to foster discussion of the role of government information librarians in the design and implementation of information literacy instruction. Increased accessibility to government information through the internet is bringing all librarians into increased contact with government information, thereby becoming ad hoc documents librarians. Through collaboration with experts in government information, shared knowledge results in opportunities for richer and more comprehensive information literacy instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

This review examines evidence of commonality and collaboration between librarians through content analysis of both general and specialized library publications.

Findings

Collaboration is a common practice in library instruction to share workload and expertise, yet most literature on this practice focuses on librarian‐faculty collaborative efforts. Limited evidence exists for collaboration between librarians and a severely limited body of literature exists when examining instructional design collaboration to include government information in information literacy instruction.

Practical implications

Collaborative instruction proactively addresses resolving perceived barriers and expands instruction resource repertoires and shares workloads.

Originality/value

Examination of the collaborative process between librarians is infrequent. This adds to the body of literature and increases awareness of additional resources in the provision of information literacy instruction.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Latisha Reynolds, Amber Willenborg, Samantha McClellan, Rosalinda Hernandez Linares and Elizabeth Alison Sterner

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Downloads
6395

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2016.

Findings

The paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Roberta L. Tipton and Patricia Bender

To present a successful collaboration between an instruction librarian and the director of a campus‐writing center for the benefit of some under prepared transfer students…

Downloads
1833

Abstract

Purpose

To present a successful collaboration between an instruction librarian and the director of a campus‐writing center for the benefit of some under prepared transfer students in an urban setting at a research university.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative. Librarian and writing instructor reflect on the pedagogy used and their collaboration.

Findings

Intensive librarian‐faculty collaboration using theoretical concepts and models from general education, writing pedagogy, and librarianship can create a successful learning space for under prepared students.

Originality/value

The actual voice of the teaching faculty is rarely heard in the library literature, but it is an integral part of this article.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Kaela Casey, Linda Kennedy, Janet Pinkley and Laura Worden

Each of Ventura County’s four public institutions of higher education list information literacy (IL) as either an institutional outcome or general education outcome for…

Abstract

Purpose

Each of Ventura County’s four public institutions of higher education list information literacy (IL) as either an institutional outcome or general education outcome for their students. Despite this, communication between the four campuses on this topic was limited. Librarians from these institutions applied to be part of the grant-funded Project ALAS Faculty Fellows Program to find ways to collaborate with each other and with teaching faculty to support the development of IL skills in transfer students.

Design/methodology/approach

Librarians from Ventura County’s four public institutions of higher education, with funding from the Project ALAS Faculty Fellows Program, held a one-day IL summit to bring librarians and teaching faculty together to unify objectives and create a seamless IL transition for transfer students.

Findings

Creating an opportunity for librarians and teaching faculty to discuss the definition and potential applications of IL in courses and assignments led to positive outcomes. Teaching faculty learned about library resources and took steps to begin collaborating with their campus librarian(s). Librarians also learned about different academic expectations in various disciplines, made new connections and made plans for future IL-focused collaborations.

Originality/value

Studies have demonstrated that IL is a key component to student transfer success. However, this is not an element in education that can be achieved by one department alone. The collaborative effort described in this paper can serve as a model for other librarians hoping to foster dialogue and cooperation amongst their regional institutions.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Sue Samson and Kim Granath

Retention rates, the development of quality first‐year experience programs, accreditation, learning outcomes, and the goal of creating life‐long learners place research…

Downloads
2285

Abstract

Retention rates, the development of quality first‐year experience programs, accreditation, learning outcomes, and the goal of creating life‐long learners place research instruction as an essential part of the academic curriculum. The ability to find information, evaluate information resources, and use quality resources to write and present research effectively is critical in this information‐rich society. This manuscript describes a research project based on a comparative analysis of randomly selected sections of English composition that include library research components integrated into their curriculum. The project implemented and analyzed pre‐ and post‐tests, the use of online instruction modules, literature cited analyses, grade comparisons, and varied instructional opportunities in an effort to identify and assess effective pedagogy for research instruction provided to entry‐level students. The results show that this collaborative model of working with teaching assistants and faculty coordinators to integrate research instruction into the writing curriculum is student‐centered and effective. This model can be readily implemented in a variety of core courses that include writing and research elements.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Christy R. Stevens and Patricia J. Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the concepts of lifelong learning, information literacy, and global citizenship, making explicit connections among them…

Downloads
2527

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the concepts of lifelong learning, information literacy, and global citizenship, making explicit connections among them via theories of social capital. It then presents a model of librarian‐faculty collaboration that relies upon information literacy as a framework for fostering lifelong learning and global citizenship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a theoretical analysis of lifelong learning, information literacy, global citizenship, and social capital in order to provide a conceptual framework for the case study that follows. The case study describes the librarian‐faculty collaboration, which included the development of course goals, the syllabus, learning outcomes and objectives, assignments, course‐integrated library instruction sessions, and assessment tools.

Findings

Social capital is a useful theoretical tool for conceptualizing pedagogical strategies for promoting information literacy and global citizenship. Pre‐ and post‐tests, questionnaires, assignments, and student reflections indicate that the three primary goals of the collaboration were met. By the end of the course, students' IL competencies improved, students had developed a better understanding of their roles as global citizens, and students were more aware of the connections among global citizenship, lifelong learning, and information literacy.

Practical implications

The paper provides practical ideas for librarian‐faculty collaboration and for integrating information literacy competencies into assignment sequences.

Originality/value

The paper uses social capital theory to make connections among lifelong learning, information literacy, and global citizenship as well as to argue for the value and import of librarian‐faculty collaborations. It also describes a successful librarian‐faculty collaboration in the context of a Global Studies course.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Amy Hatfield Hart

This chapter explores specializations within academic librarian practices, focusing on librarian research and collaboration. Academic librarian roles are transitioning…

Abstract

This chapter explores specializations within academic librarian practices, focusing on librarian research and collaboration. Academic librarian roles are transitioning from service providers to specialists, researchers, and collaborators. Roles have shifted to incorporate interdisciplinary research and collaboration; embedded librarianship; research data management expertise; information literacy instruction; and core curriculum development. In order to understand this shift in roles, a mixed methods research project undertaken with a Purdue University researcher and Purdue Libraries faculty that prompted the development of a research diagrammatic metaphor modeling the components of librarian-faculty collaboration. The model demonstrates the dynamics and roles in academic collaboration and interdisciplinary research. A generalization of the model applied to two librarian-faculty collaboration scenarios exemplifies how these components facilitate engagement and project management. Potentially the model could be operationalized to understand disciplinary differences and provide a framework of accountability for both faculty and librarians engaged in research projects.

Details

Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-903-4

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Judy Xiao

The purpose of this article is to describe a creative library orientation program utilizing Blackboard to help nursing students develop information literacy and…

Downloads
2015

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to describe a creative library orientation program utilizing Blackboard to help nursing students develop information literacy and successfully complete a cultural research paper.

Design/methodology/approach

Information literacy components and course‐specific library resources are integrated seamlessly into NRS 110 Blackboard course. The students attend a one‐hour library orientation and continue to receive research assistance from the librarian via Blackboard. Surveys are conducted to help evaluate the program's effectiveness.

Findings

Results suggest that librarian‐faculty collaboration in integrating information literacy and course‐specific library resources into Blackboard courses is an effective way to improve library instruction and student learning.

Practical implications

The article offers a model for incorporating information literacy and course‐specific library resources into faculty Blackboard courses.

Originality/value

The study will be of particular value to librarians looking to use LMS such as Blackboard to enhance traditional library instruction.

Details

Library Management, vol. 31 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Bruce E. Massis

The purpose of this column is to discuss the importance of faculty/librarian collaboration in establishing a base of reference support to serve as an underpinning for each…

Downloads
1940

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this column is to discuss the importance of faculty/librarian collaboration in establishing a base of reference support to serve as an underpinning for each course across the college curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review and commentary on this topic that has been addressed by colleagues.

Findings

It is imperative that librarians collaborate with and support the faculty on a college campus to reinforce overall academic success.

Originality/value

The value in addressing this issue is to discuss the importance of the librarian/faculty collaboration in a college and suggest the value to the students in such collaboration.

Details

New Library World, vol. 113 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Donna Harp Ziegenfuss and Cynthia Furse

The purpose of this paper is to describe a unique case of a librarian–engineering faculty partnership grounded in a faculty development National Science Foundation (NSF…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a unique case of a librarian–engineering faculty partnership grounded in a faculty development National Science Foundation (NSF) grant. Authors will describe processes, lessons learned, challenges and opportunities resulting from designing, implementing and evaluating a massive open online course (MOOC) focused on teaching faculty how to flip classes.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study presents a reflective review of the process of two unlikely collaborators who work together, write a grant, design faculty development training and develop and evaluate a MOOC. Decisions made, perspectives and lessons learned will be discussed.

Findings

The evolution of an NSF grant partnership involving an engineering faculty and librarian is presented. Larger issues, such as proactivity of librarians, non-traditional librarian roles and librarian versus academic identity, are raised and discussed.

Originality/value

This case study presents a unique type of librarian–faculty partnership, one where a librarian is a Co-PI on an NSF grant. Collaborator reflections on lessons learned, challenges and implications could be applicable to other digital/technology projects, online professional development initiatives and course design projects.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

1 – 10 of 205