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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Bruce Earnheart

Introduces libertarianism as a political philosophy, outlining a few implications stating that freedom brings responsibilities. Argues that abortion is the ultimate…

Abstract

Introduces libertarianism as a political philosophy, outlining a few implications stating that freedom brings responsibilities. Argues that abortion is the ultimate aggression as it is homicide.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2020

Aurélien Acquier, Valentina Carbone and Laëtitia Vasseur

This chapter explores how classic and institutional entrepreneurs in the sharing economy (SE) frame and make sense of the emergent, plural, and contested SE concept. The

Abstract

This chapter explores how classic and institutional entrepreneurs in the sharing economy (SE) frame and make sense of the emergent, plural, and contested SE concept. The authors address this question through an investigation of an attempt to institutionalize the SE as a separate field in France, through data collected among SE entrepreneurs gravitating around OuiShare, a leading institutional entrepreneur for the SE. To analyze the plurality of discursive framings within the SE field, we explored how classic entrepreneurs affiliated with the SE and institutional entrepreneurs made sense of the concept and its related practices by referring to different theories and narratives. The results reveal that classic entrepreneurs used and combined four distinct theoretical currents (access economy, commons, gift, and libertarianism) to frame their projects. This framing diversity was further reinforced at the meso level by specific forms of institutional entrepreneurship which reflected and actively built on such framing diversity. However, over time, such heterogeneity negatively affects the internal coherence of the field. Based on these results, the authors discuss the impact of enduring framing diversity on the SE organizational field emergence and development.

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Theorizing the Sharing Economy: Variety and Trajectories of New Forms of Organizing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-180-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Tibor R. Machan

Aims to question whether political principles, for example, those of socialism or libertarianism, have lasting significance.Design/methodology/approach – Lays out a case…

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to question whether political principles, for example, those of socialism or libertarianism, have lasting significance.Design/methodology/approach – Lays out a case for the stability of at least one variety of political principle, namely that of libertarianism or classical liberalism and argues that the normative version of these positions does manage to have lasting stability and significance.Findings – There is much that is true that people do not necessarily attend to – including certain principles of political life. It may well be true that everybody has the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, yet many of us reject this fact. Even judges and Supreme Court justices often fail to rule in a manner consistent with these principles.Originality/value – Provides insights concerning the nature of political and ethical principles.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Lauren P. Bailes and Wayne K. Hoy

– The purpose of this paper is to develop, illustrate, and apply the concept of choice architecture to schools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop, illustrate, and apply the concept of choice architecture to schools.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is a synthesis of concepts from the social science research that nudge people toward positive actions.

Findings

A dozen concepts are identified, defined, and illustrated as a set of principles and guidelines that are elaborated to guide school leaders in the science and art of choice architecture.

Practical implications

The principles of choice architecture are demonstrated to be of practical utility for school leaders in designing educational contexts for school achievement.

Originality/value

A mental toolbox of concepts and principles that are highlighted for use by school leaders to benefit students and teachers.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Walter Block

The purpose of the present paper is to test this premise of no positive obligations against a challenging critique that can be made of it. To wit, abandonment of babies…

Abstract

The purpose of the present paper is to test this premise of no positive obligations against a challenging critique that can be made of it. To wit, abandonment of babies. That is, does the mother who abandons her baby have the positive obligation to at least place it “on the church steps”, e.g. notify all other potential care givers of the fact that unless one of them comes forward with an offer to take in the infant, it will die? If so, then there is at least one positive obligation in the libertarian philosophy; if not, then, at least at the outset, the libertarian claim to be generally utilitarian must be greatly attenuated. At best, there would now be an exception to the previously impermeable principle of no positive obligations; at worst, one exception tends to leads another, posing the risk that the premise will be fatally compromised, which can undermine the entire philosophical edifice.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Bruno Frère and Juliane Reinecke

Purpose – The aim of this chapter is to deconstruct the idea of a ‘Big Society’. We do so by underlining the left libertarian tradition in which civil society led economic…

Abstract

Purpose – The aim of this chapter is to deconstruct the idea of a ‘Big Society’. We do so by underlining the left libertarian tradition in which civil society led economic activity such as the solidarity economy is embedded.

Methodology – By analysing the thought of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, a key thinker and activist in the 19th libertarian socialist movement, we identify the principles guiding the solidarity economy. We illustrate our argument by drawing on qualitative research conducted on solidarity economy organisations in France.

Findings – The solidarity economy illustrates an alternative to both capitalism and state socialism: libertarian socialism. This chapter demonstrates that this left libertarianism is not a new utopia. It is rooted in the long (but marginal) history of libertarian socialism, which was born in the 19th century.

Originality – An economy managed from the left based on libertarian political principles seems to be a novel experiment. We seek to illustrate what this may look like using the example of the present solidarity economy. However, we also emphasise that this would imply a reversal of the political programme of the ‘Big Society’. It would imply the redistribution of economic and political power not only from the state to local communities, but also from company directors and their shareholders in order to realise not a charitable but an economically empowered civil society.

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Marylouise Caldwell, Steve Elliot, Paul Henry and Marcus O'Connor

Despite consumers being essential stakeholders in the exponential growth of the sharing economy, consumers’ attitudes towards their rights and responsibilities are…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite consumers being essential stakeholders in the exponential growth of the sharing economy, consumers’ attitudes towards their rights and responsibilities are relatively unknown. This study aims to test a novel hypothesised model mapping consumers’ attitudes towards their consumer rights and responsibilities with that of their political ideology (liberalism, conservatism and libertarianism) and moral foundations (avoiding harm/fairness, in-group/loyalty, authority/respect and purity/sanctity).

Design/methodology/approach

Two survey studies were conducted with consumers of the Uber ride share service; the first being to test measures of political ideology and consumer rights/responsibilities. These measures were then taken into the second study along with the Moral Foundations Questionnaire. The hypothesised model was tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings suggest that political ideology associates with similarities and differences in how consumers perceive their rights and responsibilities in the sharing economy, including mutual self-regulation. Support for these findings is established by identifying links with specific moral foundations.

Research limitations/implications

This study considers a single participant in the sharing economy.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Vladimír Svoboda

The paper addresses the question as to what kind of a redistribution of wealth created within a society is righteous. It aims to show that philosophically motivated…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper addresses the question as to what kind of a redistribution of wealth created within a society is righteous. It aims to show that philosophically motivated libertarian economic conceptions of justice designed to rationalize the unacceptability of progressive taxation – in particular conceptions of the Nozick type – are built on questionable bases because their proponents neglect facts that play a key role in the socio-economic reality of modern Western societies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents critical evaluation of one of the cornerstones of the libertarian conception of economical justice. It makes use of a model example.

Findings

The scholars who approve of the regime of limited responsibility for the consequences of economic failure and yet make a claim for the unlimited fruit of one’s economic success adopt a problematic position that is internally incoherent.

Originality/value

The argumentation against the Nozick type arguments against progressive taxation is, as far as the author knows, original.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Abstract

Details

Philosophy, Politics, and Austrian Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-405-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Stuart Millson

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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