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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Cheng‐chung Lai and Paul B. Trescott

To review one of the earliest Chinese debates on socialism, highlighting the consequent changes in outlook by Sun Yat‐sen and Liang Qichao; and to demonstrate the…

922

Abstract

Purpose

To review one of the earliest Chinese debates on socialism, highlighting the consequent changes in outlook by Sun Yat‐sen and Liang Qichao; and to demonstrate the influence of Western economic writers especially Richard T. Ely, Henry George, and German Bismarckian socialists.

Design/methodology/approach

Textual analysis of original Chinese‐language materials with extensive direct quotations (in translation).

Findings

Sun initially gave primary attention to land policy, using a (somewhat inconsistent) combination of George's “single tax” and a very different idea of land nationalization. As a result of the debate, however, Sun gave more attention to economic growth, capital formation, and import restriction. Liang initially favored Bismarckian socialism, but moved during the debate to increasing skepticism about a major economic role for government, recognizing the need for entrepreneurship and capital formation.

Originality/value

Existing literature fails to perceive the radical shifts in viewpoint which developed for both Sun and Liang. This is particularly important for Sun, whose later ideas had a major influence on Chinese economic policy after 1927.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Xi Hu, Zhenjiao Chen, Robert M. Davison and Yaqin Liu

This study aims to investigate the factors influencing consumers' continued social commerce (s-commerce) intention and its underlying mechanism.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the factors influencing consumers' continued social commerce (s-commerce) intention and its underlying mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors define continued s-commerce intention as consumers' intention to continually participate in s-commerce activities, namely, requesting and sharing commercial information. Grounded in the motivation theory, perceived usefulness and perceived enjoyment are identified in this study as the motives behind consumers' continued s-commerce intention. Given the indispensable social facet of s-commerce, the authors include social support as another critical social factor motivating continuance intention. Furthermore, users' perceptions are affected by prior s-commerce outcomes, which concern the effectiveness of the commercial information exchange process. Research suggests that in such a context, the result of communication is jointly determined by source credibility and interactive relationships amongst individuals. Whilst source credibility determines the usefulness of the information transmitted, a social interaction supports this process. Therefore, source credibility and social interactions are crucial to the outcomes of s-commerce, which, in turn, affect consumers' perceived usefulness, perceived enjoyment and social support in s-commerce. Building on these arguments, the authors propose our research model and then test the hypotheses via a survey.

Findings

The authors find that consumers' perceived usefulness and informational social support of s-commerce directly affect their continued s-commerce intention. Moreover, perceived enjoyment leads to continued s-commerce intention via the mediation of perceived usefulness, whilst emotional social support influences continued s-commerce intention through the mediator of informational social support. In addition, source credibility is a significant antecedent of consumers' usefulness, enjoyment and social support perceptions, whilst a social interaction significantly impacts perceived enjoyment and social support.

Originality/value

Various consumer behaviours in s-commerce have been studied; however, the continuance intention to participate in the s-commerce activity remains unknown. This empirical study fills this research gap. Moreover, the authors initially reveal s-commerce participants' utilitarian orientation in the post-adoption stage: perceived usefulness and informational social support affect continuance intention more directly than perceived enjoyment and emotional social support. Further, prior studies on information systems continuance have mainly focused on technical features. By identifying the influence from social factors, i.e. social support, this work extends the literature on information systems continuance.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Low Sui Pheng and Ben S.K. Lee

States that much of the existing management literature was written entirely from a Western perspective without any reference to practices in the East. Explains that, in…

4397

Abstract

States that much of the existing management literature was written entirely from a Western perspective without any reference to practices in the East. Explains that, in the booming East Asian market, project managers from the West would need to pay special attention to Oriental beliefs, cultures and philosophies. Attempts, for the purpose of integration, to put together the managerial grid framework from the West with an ancient Chinese strategic treatise written by Zhuge Liang 1,600 years ago. Suggests that there are many similarities between the “Managerial grid” and Zhuge Liang’s “Art of management” when used to resolve problems related to project management.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Low Sui Pheng and Ben Lee Siew Keong

A review of existing management literature reveals that most of the literature is written entirely from a Western perspective without any references to practices in the…

2694

Abstract

A review of existing management literature reveals that most of the literature is written entirely from a Western perspective without any references to practices in the East. In the fast‐growing construction market of China, managers from the West need to pay special attention to Eastern beliefs, cultures and management practices, including those passed down by prominent ancient Chinese sages. Zhuge Liang was an outstanding statesman and military scientist who lived around the period of the Three Kingdoms (ad 220‐289). He studied the Chinese classics and became talented and knowledgeable, rich in his thoughts and subtle in analysing critical political situations. The objectives of this paper are to explain Zhuge Liang′s Art of Management and by implications, provide some insights as to how effective construction project management can be developed through a better understanding of Zhuge Liang′s Art of Management.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Low Sui Pheng and Ben S.K. Lee

Much existing literature was written entirely from a Western perspective without any reference to practices in the East. In the booming east Asian market, project managers…

3464

Abstract

Much existing literature was written entirely from a Western perspective without any reference to practices in the East. In the booming east Asian market, project managers from the West would need to pay special attention to eastern beliefs, cultures and philosophies. Attempts to put together the managerial grid framework from the West with an ancient Chinese strategic treatise written by Zhuge Liang 1,600 years ago. Suggests that there are many similarities between the managerial grid and Zhuge Liang’s Art of Management when used for leadership development in construction project management.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2022

Sai Liang, Qiang Ye, Xiaoxia Zhang, Rob Law and Caiyan Gong

Online reviews have become increasingly important and numerous studies have noted the effect of social factors on the review provision of users. The purpose of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Online reviews have become increasingly important and numerous studies have noted the effect of social factors on the review provision of users. The purpose of this study is to investigate how hometowner contributions, which are defined as prior reviews posted by users from the same city, affect the quality of reviews by focal users.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theories of competitive altruism, pure altruism and reciprocity, as well as several social influence theories, a conceptual framework is constructed to explain user contribution behavior. In addition, empirical models are established based on 831,737 reviews of 919 hotels on Tripadvisor.

Findings

The quality of reviews by hometowners can significantly motivate subsequent users to contribute high-quality reviews. This positive effect is stronger than the effect of previous contributions by non-hometowners. The effect of hometowner contribution is amplified in users with limited review-posting experience and/or in those from countries with a considerable cultural distance from the target destination.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides the hospitality literature with new insights into the effect of social factors on the review provision of users in the context of online hotel review websites. The results also present numerous practical implications for online travel communities.

Originality/value

This study is an early attempt to analyze the effect of prior hometowner contributions on the subsequent contribution decisions of focal users. Thus, this study provides a satisfactory starting point for determining whether the review provision of focal users can be affected differently by prior contributions from their peers from different categories.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Chenhui Liu, Huigang Liang, Nengmin Wang and Yajiong Xue

Employees’ information security policy (ISP) compliance exerts a significant strain on information security management. Drawing upon the compliance theory and control…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees’ information security policy (ISP) compliance exerts a significant strain on information security management. Drawing upon the compliance theory and control theory, this study attempts to examine the moderating roles of organizational commitment and gender in the relationships between reward/punishment expectancy and employees' ISP compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data collected from 310 employees in Chinese organizations that have formally adopted information security policies, the authors applied the partial least square method to test hypotheses.

Findings

Punishment expectancy positively affects ISP compliance, but reward expectancy has no significant impact on ISP compliance. Compared with committed employees, both reward expectancy and punishment expectancy have stronger impacts on low-commitment employees' ISP compliance. As for gender differences, punishment expectancy exerts a stronger effect on females' ISP compliance than it does on males.

Originality/value

By investigating the moderating roles of organizational commitment and gender, this paper offers a deeper understanding of reward and punishment in the context of ISP compliance. The findings reveal that efforts in building organizational commitment will reduce the reliance on reward and punishment, and further controls rather than the carrot and stick should be applied to ensure male employees' ISP compliance.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Aidan P. Walsh, Denis Harrington and Peter Hines

Hospital organisations are currently experiencing significant challenges that have encouraged a move towards a value-based approach to health care. However, such a…

1041

Abstract

Purpose

Hospital organisations are currently experiencing significant challenges that have encouraged a move towards a value-based approach to health care. However, such a transition requires understanding the underlying competencies required to enable such a focus. This paper aims to undertake a systematic review of the available literature on managerial competencies in hospitals and considers these in a value-based health-care context.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted to identify research studies that describe the characteristics of management competence in hospital environments.

Findings

Categories and sub-categories of management competence in hospitals were identified and considered in a value-based health-care context.

Research limitations/implications

The systematic literature review identifies a need for further research regarding managerial competencies of managers of hospitals. Competencies for managing in a value-based health-care model also require deeper investigation.

Practical implications

The categories of management competence provide guidance to organisations transitioning towards value-based health care in terms of identifying and developing management competencies. Hospitals should consider the development of a competency model that includes broader categories of competencies than purely clinical or professional competencies.

Originality/value

This study builds upon and advances previous reviews of management competence in hospitals, and the competency categories presented can be used as a basis to identify management competency requirements in hospitals.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2019

Nianxin Wang, Huigang Liang, Shilun Ge, Yajiong Xue and Jing Ma

The purpose of this paper is to understand what inhibit or facilitate cloud computing (CC) assimilation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what inhibit or facilitate cloud computing (CC) assimilation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigate the effects of two enablers, top management support (TMS) and government support (GS), and two inhibitors, organization inertia (OI) and data security risk (DSR) on CC assimilation. The authors posit that enablers and inhibitors influence CC assimilation separately and interactively. The research model is empirically tested by using the field survey data from 376 Chinese firms.

Findings

Both TMS and GS positively and DSR negatively influence CC assimilation. OI negatively moderates the TMS–assimilation link, and DSR negatively moderates the GS–assimilation link.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate that enablers and inhibitors influence CC assimilation in both separate and joint manners, suggesting that CC assimilation is a much more complex process and demands new knowledge to be learned.

Practical implications

For these firms with a high level of OI, only TMS is not enough, and top managers should find other effective way to successfully implement structural and behavioral change in the process of CC assimilation. For policy makers, they should actively play their supportive roles in CC assimilation.

Originality/value

A new framework is developed to identify key drivers of CC assimilation along two bipolar dimensions including enabling vs inhibiting and internal vs external.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Ogan M. Yigitbasioglu

While many studies have predominantly looked at the benefits and risks of cloud computing, little is known whether and to what extent institutional forces play a role in…

2036

Abstract

Purpose

While many studies have predominantly looked at the benefits and risks of cloud computing, little is known whether and to what extent institutional forces play a role in cloud computing adoption. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of institutional factors in top management team’s (TMT’s) decision to adopt cloud computing services.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed and tested with data from an Australian survey using the partial least squares modeling technique.

Findings

The results suggest that mimetic and coercive pressures influence TMT’s beliefs in the benefits of cloud computing. The results also show that TMT’s beliefs drive TMT’s participation, which in turn affects the intention to increase the adoption of cloud computing solutions.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies could incorporate the influences of local actors who might also press for innovation.

Practical implications

Given the influence of institutional forces and the plethora of cloud-based solutions on the market, it is recommended that TMTs exercise a high degree of caution when deciding for the types of applications to be outsourced as organizational requirements in terms of performance and security will differ.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the growing empirical literature on cloud computing adoption and offers the institutional framework as an alternative lens with which to interpret cloud-based information technology outsourcing.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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