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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Tom Glynn and Connie Wu

A task force at Rutgers University Libraries was charged with exploring ways to develop more effective liaison relations with teaching departments. As a preliminary step…

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Abstract

A task force at Rutgers University Libraries was charged with exploring ways to develop more effective liaison relations with teaching departments. As a preliminary step the working group surveyed Rutgers liaisons to identify preferred practices and to solicit comments on trends in liaisonship in academic libraries. Based on this survey, we examine changes in the information profession and how they have effected the reference and instruction that departmental liaisons provide to faculty and students. Particular emphasis is placed on the impact of the Internet. Generally, electronic resources have made faculty and students less reliant on liaisons for help with their research, while electronic communication, especially via e‐mail, has the potential to make liaisonship more efficient and effective. We offer a number of recommendations for effective liaisonship, including concise and purposeful e‐mail messages and making direct and personal contact with faculty and students whenever possible.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2008

John Rodwell and Linden Fairbairn

Many university libraries are adopting a faculty liaison librarian structure as an integral part of their organization and service delivery model. This paper aims to…

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4587

Abstract

Purpose

Many university libraries are adopting a faculty liaison librarian structure as an integral part of their organization and service delivery model. This paper aims to examine, in a pragmatic way, the variations in the definition of the role of the faculty liaison librarian, the expectations of those librarians, their library managers and their clients and the impact of environmental factors. The faculty liaison librarian role is not entirely new, evolving from the traditional subject librarian and university special/branch library role. However the emerging role is characterized by a more outward‐looking perspective and complexity, emphasizing stronger involvement and partnership with the faculty and direct engagement in the University's teaching and research programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of the literature and other sources on the rationale and role of library liaison, the current developments, drivers and expectations are discussed.

Findings

The study finds that dynamic external and internal environments of universities are driving the evolution of library liaison, so the role description is still fluid. However, the breadth and weight of expectations is now such that the effectiveness and sustainability of the role has to be addressed.

Practical implications

While a dynamic, broader and more intensive role for the faculty liaison librarian is emerging, more thinking is needed about the extent of that role and its sustainability. What, for example, are the priorities for the faculty liaison librarian? What traditional activities can, and may, have to be abandoned? These considerations are necessary not only to guide the librarians, but also to help define the attributes and skills required for the position and to determine the institutional support it requires.

Originality/value

This is a contemporary critique of the well‐established, but diverse library service – the faculty liaison librarian structure.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Cynthia C. Ryans, Raghini S. Suresh and Wei‐Ping Zhang

Liaison programmes have been in existence in academic libraries fora number of years. A liaison programme is a co‐operative agreementbetween the library and academic units…

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1494

Abstract

Liaison programmes have been in existence in academic libraries for a number of years. A liaison programme is a co‐operative agreement between the library and academic units to foster better communication, improve services and enhance collection development. In order for it to be operated effectively such a programme needs to be assessed on an ongoing basis. Reports the findings of an assessment survey which was conducted in the spring of 1992 at Kent State University Libraries and Media Services, Kent, Ohio. The assessment of this programme offers some guidelines for assessing similar programmes at other institutions.

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Library Review, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Book part
Publication date: 6 April 2018

Jennifer L. Snow, Sarah Anderson, Carolyn Cort, Sherry Dismuke and A. J. Zenkert

Recognizing the importance of developing professional identities and valuing the work of school-based teacher educators, this chapter outlines a specific context in which…

Abstract

Recognizing the importance of developing professional identities and valuing the work of school-based teacher educators, this chapter outlines a specific context in which teacher leaders self-identified and worked across contexts to support teacher development within their schools. This chapter’s primary focus includes the perceptions and experiences of teacher leaders in school–university partnerships connected to one university in one identified role: liaison-in-residence. Three themes resulted from analysis of transcripts, journals, and memos: teacher leader identity developed within democratic leadership; teacher leader positionality stirs tensions in professional identity; and service and equity as key guideposts for leading and learning.

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Matt Fossey, Lauren Godier-McBard, Elspeth A. Guthrie, Jenny Hewison, Peter Trigwell, Chris J. Smith and Allan O. House

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges that are experienced by staff responsible for commissioning liaison psychiatry services and to establish if these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges that are experienced by staff responsible for commissioning liaison psychiatry services and to establish if these are shared by other health professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-methods design, the findings from a mental health commissioner workshop (n = 12) were used to construct a survey that was distributed to health care professionals using an opportunistic framework (n = 98).

Findings

Four key themes emerged from the workshop, which was tested using the survey. The importance of secure funding; a better understanding of health care systems and pathways; partnership working and co-production and; access to mental health clinical information in general hospitals. There was broad convergence between commissioners, mental health clinicians and managers, except in relation to gathering and sharing of data. This suggests that poor communication between professionals is of concern.

Research limitations/implications

There were a small number of survey respondents (n = 98). The sampling used an opportunistic framework that targeted commissioner and clinician forums. Using an opportunistic framework, the sample may not be representative. Additionally, multiple pairwise comparisons were conducted during the analysis of the survey responses, increasing the risk that significant results were found by chance.

Practical implications

A number of steps were identified that could be applied in practice. These mainly related to the importance of collecting and communicating data and co-production with commissioners in the design, development and monitoring of liaison psychiatry services.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has specifically considered the challenges associated with the commissioning of liaison psychiatry services.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Vanessa Louise Shaw

The purpose of this paper is to improve the health and criminal justice outcomes for people who come into contact with the criminal justice system. People with learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the health and criminal justice outcomes for people who come into contact with the criminal justice system. People with learning disabilities (LD) are particularly vulnerable to health and social inequalities within the criminal justice system.

Design/methodology/approach

Using examples from practice, this paper discusses some of the challenges and achievements experienced by a LD nurse employed within a liaison and diversion service within the North-West of England.

Findings

Whilst the specific functions of liaison and diversion practitioners are detailed by National Health Service (NHS) England (2014), complexities in communication, multi-disciplinary working and role recognition affect the embedment of the role in practice.

Research limitations/implications

The implications for practice are identified and recommendations for further research made. These seek to evaluate the impact of liaison and diversion services from the perspectives of LD nurses within liaison and diversion services, people with LD, their families and the wider multi-disciplinary team.

Originality/value

NHS England (2015) are in the process of evaluating of liaison and diversion services. This paper adds to the evaluation by discussing the experiences of a LD nurse within a liaison and diversion service through the inclusion of activity data and illustrative examples.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Andrew Leykam

The purpose of this paper is to explore actual interlibrary loan (ILL) usage patterns as a way to improve ILL services and assist in library liaison work.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore actual interlibrary loan (ILL) usage patterns as a way to improve ILL services and assist in library liaison work.

Design/methodology/approach

The study assesses ILL services at a mid‐size comprehensive college library in order to see who is utilizing the current service. Usage patterns are constructed and explored based on data collected over a three‐year period. The requested materials' publication date and Library of Congress subject heading, as well as the requestor's academic status (faculty, graduate student, undergraduate student) and department are addressed.

Findings

Usage patterns can accurately illustrate trends in the borrowing behavior of patrons in order to gain a better understanding of their needs. The majority of users were faculty members from a limited number of academic departments. Usage patterns can be very helpful in constructing and focusing liaison work. A thorough study of ILL usage patterns is a viable undertaking worthwhile for any institution looking to improve and expand its ILL and liaison services.

Practical implications

This paper recommends that The College of Staten Island Library utilize ILL statistics to improve and redesign Liaison activities to under‐represented departments. Assessing ILL usage patterns can enable a quick and accurate overview of actual use for improving ILL and liaison services.

Originality/value

Previous research has linked Interlibrary Loan services to collection development. The current study links the assessment of actual ILL usage patterns with liaison activities beyond collection development.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

James Thull and Mary Anne Hansen

The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated definition of academic liaison work and examine methods for developing effective liaison relationships.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated definition of academic liaison work and examine methods for developing effective liaison relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed and incorporated recently published (1989‐2009) material relating to academic liaison work. In addition to published material the authors conducted a survey of faculty in their liaison areas during the fall 2008 semester in order to access their knowledge and satisfaction with liaison services.

Findings

The paper finds that liaison work is multifaceted and success is based both on administrative support and the individual liaisons efforts.

Originality/value

The originality of this work includes the definition of liaison work and requirements of academic liaisons in today's libraries. The paper is of value to current academic liaisons and librarians just entering the field of academia. The paper incorporates recent research, an author conducted survey and the authors' nearly two decades of combined liaison experience and may serve as an overview of the expectations and potential benefits of academic liaison work.

Details

New Library World, vol. 110 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Ramirose Ilene Attebury and Joshua Finnell

The purpose of this paper is to analyze job advertisements in United States academic libraries in order to determine the prevalence of jobs that contain a liaison

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze job advertisements in United States academic libraries in order to determine the prevalence of jobs that contain a liaison component. It also aims to report on a survey of current library science graduate students to assess their level of understanding of what liaison work entails and what type of preparation they have had for such work in their LIS program.

Design/methodology/approach

The study includes an analysis of 313 academic library job advertisements. It also uses a 12 question survey, which was distributed to 52 library school listservs throughout the USA. The survey announcements resulted in 516 responses from library school students nationwide.

Findings

Of the jobs surveyed more than a quarter specifically mentioned liaison activities. The survey showed that few respondents have been exposed to a discussion of liaison work in their classrooms. Those who have demonstrated greater awareness of what constitutes liaison work demonstrate greater self‐confidence in their ability to become successful liaisons.

Research limitations/implications

The anonymous survey did not require participants to indicate what school they attended, possibly resulting in a geographically biased sample. The survey also did not ask respondents at what point they were in their program, so that some respondents may have been very new to their library school studies and may not have had the opportunity to take many classes at the time of the survey.

Practical implications

This study suggests that library schools should find ways to incorporate a discussion of liaison work into some part of their curriculum, especially for students interested in academic librarianship.

Originality/value

No other studies have analyzed job descriptions in terms of liaison work, nor have any studies surveyed students to determine their knowledge of, and preparation for, this type of work.

Details

New Library World, vol. 110 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Mattias Jacobsson

The purpose of this paper is to understand the collaborative aspects of the communication practice and illustrate the importance of role‐related liaison devices for…

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1461

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the collaborative aspects of the communication practice and illustrate the importance of role‐related liaison devices for coordination in a project setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was made of a large Swedish partnering project focusing on the coordinative and communicative activities carried out within the project. It consists of 18 semi‐structured interviews, three days of observations, meeting participations, document analysis, and was analysed with a theoretically supported thematic categorisation.

Findings

The paper describes the communicative sub‐processes of the project and analyses the link between them. The focus is placed on illustrating the importance of the project liaison as a crucial part of the coordination of the project. It is shown how the project liaisons; guides and coordinates the ongoing activities, translates and reduces information, creates space for the experience of the subcontractors, assists in coordinating unexpected situations, and therefore constitutes a crucial part of the success of the project.

Research limitations/implications

From a project management perspective it is suggested that it is beneficial to identify, acknowledge, and create legitimacy for project liaisons in order to facilitate the coordination of the project. As the project liaison is shown to be of major importance it is also suggested that there is a need to further study the existence and role of liaisons within project organisations.

Originality/value

The paper draws on organisational theory and therefore enriches the field of project coordination as it also includes and stresses the importance of the human actors.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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