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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Paul W. Farris, Ervin R. Shames and Jordan Mitchell

In early 2002, Levi Strauss was considering rekindling its Wal-Mart relationship with a new value brand. How should the brand be developed to preserve sales with existing…

Abstract

In early 2002, Levi Strauss was considering rekindling its Wal-Mart relationship with a new value brand. How should the brand be developed to preserve sales with existing customers in other channels? Was it possible to leverage the iconic Levi's name while remaining competitive and not affecting consumers' propensity to purchase other Levi's product lines at higher price points?

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Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Demetris Vrontis and Peri Vronti

In their consistent search for growth opportunities, firms are increasingly recognising the benefits of becoming multinationals and expanding internationally. This case…

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Abstract

In their consistent search for growth opportunities, firms are increasingly recognising the benefits of becoming multinationals and expanding internationally. This case study outlines a theoretical exegesis of global standardisation and international adaptation. The debate between these two concepts is explored and their respective benefits considered. Subsequently, the role of the marketing mix and strategy are examined in relation to the above approaches along with the consideration of the various factors, which suggests a particular marketing mix approach. Finally, the feasibility of an overall marketing strategy will be assessed with the assistance of the appropriate theoretical models. In facilitating the comprehension of the above task, Levi's the fashion clothing retailer and their jeans' subdivision is utilised to exemplify all the issues outlined.

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Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Guilherme L. J. Falleiros

This chapter deals with different perspectives and structural transformations between capitalist society and indigenous ways of life. I approach the A’uwẽ-Xavante myth of…

Abstract

This chapter deals with different perspectives and structural transformations between capitalist society and indigenous ways of life. I approach the A’uwẽ-Xavante myth of the theft of the jaguar’s fire, one of many versions of the story of the bird-nester, which Lévi-Strauss interprets as the acquisition of culture through cooking technique. I compare it with Proudhon’s study on property as the theft of collective force which he treats as the groundwork of the manufacturing process in capitalist society. This highlights the difference between Proudhon’s ideal mutualism, based on free access to means of production and polytechnic education, and the A’uwẽ-Xavante’s acquisition of power and its technical reproduction. Proudhon’s mutualism envisages auto-organization of collective force in cooperative work favoring its collective appropriation by the workers; while in the A’uwẽ-Xavante way of life, there is an off-centered collective force from which technical acquisition is redistributed. In common with Proudhon’s ideal labor mutualism, A’uwẽ-Xavante’s ways welcome outsiders to their means of production of people; but unlike Proudhon’s, this welcome is not for free: they have to prove their generosity and personal commitment to the game.

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Anthropological Enquiries into Policy, Debt, Business, and Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-659-4

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Individualism, Holism and the Central Dilemma of Sociological Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-038-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Genessa M. Fratto, Michelle R. Jones and Nancy L. Cassill

The aim of this paper is to investigate competitive pricing strategies of apparel brands and retailers.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate competitive pricing strategies of apparel brands and retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a broad discussion of competition by examining Porter's five forces model, and narrows by examining price competition within price tiers in the retail apparel industry according to store format and brands. Included are case studies of apparel retailers and brands incorporating concepts of pricing strategies, brand positioning, and price competition, with a focus on retail channel relationships. The paper analyzes the impact of price competition on apparel retailers and brands, and further examines price tiers as a competitive strategy.

Findings

The study reveals that the concept of price tiers is applicable to apparel retailers and brands. Price tiering is a vehicle for market positioning for the retail apparel industry. Retailers are enacting a price tier strategy by branding their retail store formats or engaging store brands as a vehicle of differentiation for a tier. Retailers and brands can be successful with a price tier strategy, unless they fail to differentiate between tiers on factors other than on price alone.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of relevant price competition literature, relating to the retailer apparel industry, forced the exploration of price competition literature from grocery and automotive sectors.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on the impact of price competition on apparel retailers and brands, and also price tiers as a competitive strategy.

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Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Book part
Publication date: 18 October 2017

Patrick Banon

Debates over ritual slaughter, sacred food, fasts, and forbidden foods, perpetuated by religion and tradition, are nothing new. Dietary obligations and prohibitions, in…

Abstract

Debates over ritual slaughter, sacred food, fasts, and forbidden foods, perpetuated by religion and tradition, are nothing new. Dietary obligations and prohibitions, in all their diversity, have always been the object of comment, critique, or even concern from one human group towards another. The consumption of meat (or its prohibition) has always been about more than its nutritional function. Reducing religious dietary obligations to hygienic or gustatory practices would be an unrealistic attempt to erase the diversity of the procedures which people undertake to give meaning to life, death, and the world, and to locate themselves in relation to “others”. These rites, ­legitimated by myths, inevitably provoke phenomena of influence, reciprocated within and outside groups. The selection of food – of meat in particular – plays a primordial role as a social marker, the rules of which contribute to the organisation of groups by tracing ­differences between individuals, between men and women, and between communities. Formerly attached to a totemic group and its territory, then to a religion and its society, dietary practices are globalising and encountering one-another. Questions are now raised about the management, in shared spaces, of a diversity of dietary prohibitions and obligations. These questions are at the core of this chapter, notably, what place should be reserved for dietary particularities in collective catering in human organisations? And what limits should be given to the expectations of each regarding dietary purity or fasting?

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Management and Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-489-1

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Jiří šubrt

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The Perspective of Historical Sociology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-363-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Whether you are based in the USA, Europe or the Far East, now is not a good time to be in the corporate game. Markets are struggling, corruption is rife and trust in big…

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1047

Abstract

Whether you are based in the USA, Europe or the Far East, now is not a good time to be in the corporate game. Markets are struggling, corruption is rife and trust in big business is diminishing daily. All over the globe, companies are berating their bad fortune at the terrible timing of this global depression.

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Strategic Direction, vol. 18 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Jack S. Tillotson and Diane M. Martin

We aim to understand what happens when larger social and cultural myths become the incarnate understanding of consumers within the firm. This paper uncovers the varied…

Abstract

Purpose

We aim to understand what happens when larger social and cultural myths become the incarnate understanding of consumers within the firm. This paper uncovers the varied myths at play in one Finnish company’s status as an inadvertent cultural icon.

Methodology/approach

Through a qualitative inquiry of Finland’s largest dairy producer and by employing the theoretical lens of myth, we conceptualize the entanglement of broad cultural, social, and organizational myths within the organization.

Findings

Macro-mythic structures merge with everyday employee practice giving consumer understanding flesh within the firm (Hallet, 2010). Mythological thinking leaves organizational members inevitably bound up in a form of consumer knowing that is un-reflective and inadvertently effects brand marketing management.

Originality/value

Working through a nuanced typology of myth (Tillotson & Martin, 2014) provided a deeper understanding of how managers may become increasingly un-reflexive in their marketing activities. This case also provides a cautionary tale for heterogeneous communities where ideological conflict underscores development and adoption of contemporary myths.

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Mikko Rönkkö, Juhana Peltonen and Pia Arenius

Entrepreneurial bricolage has been proposed as a method of alleviating resource constraints of entrepreneurial firms. However, the outcomes of bricolage for a firm may…

Abstract

Entrepreneurial bricolage has been proposed as a method of alleviating resource constraints of entrepreneurial firms. However, the outcomes of bricolage for a firm may vary greatly. One of the most pressing issues is to clarify how bricolage may enhance firm growth. Based on case studies, Baker and Nelson (2005) propose that applying bricolage in limited areas (“selective bricolage”) may enable firms to grow, whereas excessive (“parallel”) bricolage may lead to the opposite outcome. However, the process of testing the generalizability of this relationship using quantitative methods has just begun. In this chapter, we describe our efforts to develop a scale that measures bricolage manifestation in firms by using the “environmental domains” of Baker and Nelson (2005) to facilitate quantitative testing of the bricolage–growth relationship.

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Entrepreneurial Resourcefulness: Competing With Constraints
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-018-5

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