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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2016

Laura MacPherson, Anahi Collado, Carl W. Lejuez, Richard A. Brown and Matthew T. Tull

Cigarette smoking remains the primary preventable cause of mortality and morbidity globally. The overarching goal of the paper is to disseminate the Behavioral Activation…

Abstract

Purpose

Cigarette smoking remains the primary preventable cause of mortality and morbidity globally. The overarching goal of the paper is to disseminate the Behavioral Activation Treatment for Smoking (BATS), which integrates behavioral activation principles with standard treatment guidelines to assist individuals in achieving short- and long-term smoking cessation. Through a series of sequential steps, BATS guides individuals who wish to quit smoking to increase their engagement in healthy, pleasurable, and value-consistent activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The document provides the BATS rationale and contains an abridged manual for use by clinicians and/or researchers in the context of clinical trials. Findings: BATS is accruing empirical evidence that suggests its ability to promote successful smoking cessation outcomes while decreasing any associated depressive symptoms.

Findings

BATS is accruing empirical evidence that suggests its ability to promote successful smoking cessation outcomes while decreasing any associated depressive symptoms.

Practical implications

A description of key components, forms, and strategies to address common treatment barriers are included.

Originality/value

BATS’s strong roots in learning theories and its idiographic nature allow for the intervention to be implemented flexibly across a wide range of settings and smoking populations. The treatment may also be combined seamlessly with pharmacotherapies. BATS targets both cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms, which constitute a significant barrier to cessation, through a common pathway: increasing rewarding activities. The treatment offers a parsimonious complement to standard smoking cessation treatments.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 9 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

SERGIO M. FOCARDI and FRANK J. FABOZZI

Fat‐tailed distributions have been found in many financial and economic variables ranging from forecasting returns on financial assets to modeling recovery distributions…

Abstract

Fat‐tailed distributions have been found in many financial and economic variables ranging from forecasting returns on financial assets to modeling recovery distributions in bankruptcies. They have also been found in numerous insurance applications such as catastrophic insurance claims and in value‐at‐risk measures employed by risk managers. Financial applications include:

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Paul E. Levy, Steven T. Tseng, Christopher C. Rosen and Sarah B. Lueke

In recent years, practitioners have identified a number of problems with traditional performance management (PM) systems, arguing that PM is broken and needs to be fixed…

Abstract

In recent years, practitioners have identified a number of problems with traditional performance management (PM) systems, arguing that PM is broken and needs to be fixed. In this chapter, we review criticisms of traditional PM practices that have been mentioned by journalists and practitioners and we consider the solutions that they have presented for addressing these concerns. We then consider these problems and solutions within the context of extant scholarly research and identify (a) what organizations should do going forward to improve PM practices (i.e., focus on feedback processes, ensure accountability throughout the PM system, and align the PM system with organizational strategy) and (b) what scholars should focus research attention on (i.e., technology, strategic alignment, and peer-to-peer accountability) in order to reduce the science-practice gap in this domain.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1984

Charles P. Holt

Every day businesses face investment decisions—and managers can now buy software packages that let the computer do the work. Or they can squeeze the extra work out of a…

Abstract

Every day businesses face investment decisions—and managers can now buy software packages that let the computer do the work. Or they can squeeze the extra work out of a standard package such as Lotus 1–2–3, which currently has more than a million users. Let's review what's involved in screening investment decisions and investigate how managers could use software with which they're already familiar to analyse investment alternatives.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

David Allner and John Teire

Learning through experience and participation in training courses may be old hat to some. But in general, the training manager who is dissatisfied with the conventional…

Abstract

Learning through experience and participation in training courses may be old hat to some. But in general, the training manager who is dissatisfied with the conventional approach does not find it easy to change his courses in this direction. This article is based on the authors' work with a number of organisations in introducing experiential training, and reflects the thoughts, problems and objectives of doing so as seen through the eyes of company training manager, Jim …

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Abstract

Details

Automated Information Retrieval: Theory and Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12266-170-9

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Chiaki Iwasaki, Yasuhiro Tada, Tomoki Furukawa, Kaede Sasaki, Yoshinori Yamada, Tsutomu Nakazawa and Tomoya Ikezawa

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development and assessment of learning support environments for academic writing that utilize ICT, such as e-learning and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development and assessment of learning support environments for academic writing that utilize ICT, such as e-learning and online tutoring, in Japanese higher education. First, the authors introduce the design of an e-learning writing program for the Japanese language and assess whether the program is an effective learning support tool for undergraduates. Second, the authors analyze and assess online tutoring support for academic writing and clarify the merits and disadvantages of online and offline tutoring at writing centers, then suggest instructional strategies by analyzing the writing tutoring process.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted e-learning goals to assess its effectiveness. The authors asked the participants questions they could answer from five-point scales, conducted a paired t-test, and included a free description-type questionnaire. Then, to assess online tutoring, the 12 students took pre- and post-test questionnaires, after which the authors conducted a Wilcoxon signed rank test. In addition, the authors carried out a Kruskal–Wallis rank sum test in order to confirm differences in satisfaction level and the effectiveness of face-to-face tutoring and online tutoring.

Findings

By analyzing the pre- and post-test results, the t-test confirmed that the students found the e-learning system to be effective for nurturing academic literacy. This means the system is appropriate as a support tool for nurturing academic writing, especially writing knowledge and rules, and university must provide a comprehensive learning support environment including e-learning. Next, the authors found no statistically significant difference between face-to-face and online tutoring, although some problems with the writing process remained. So online tutoring has opportunity to promote autonomous learning. The research results make it clear that because of writing centers’ potential and their effectiveness in utilizing ICT tools.

Originality/value

Research findings about academic writing are to improve the tutoring process and writing strategies, such as the use of ICT for academic writing support like e-learning, online tutoring, do not exist. To provide learning opportunity to learners and promote autonomous learning, e-learning and online tutoring are important. For the reasons noted above, it is necessary to provide an alternative writing support environment to students in Japan. Therefore, the authors report on and assess the development of learning support environments for e-learning programs and online tutoring for academic writing at the undergraduate level in Japan.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2414-6994

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1978

Robert J. Allio

Canada's Department of Industry, Trade, and Commerce (DITC) is similar in many ways to the U.S. Department of Commerce. Planning Review's Editorial Director accosted…

Abstract

Canada's Department of Industry, Trade, and Commerce (DITC) is similar in many ways to the U.S. Department of Commerce. Planning Review's Editorial Director accosted Gordon Osbaldeston, the Department's urbane Deputy Minister, in Ottawa to ask some tough questions about how this key Department functions and the place of planning in the federal government.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Frances Devlin, Lea Currie and John Stratton

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether librarians at the University of Kansas are providing instruction through chat in order to develop best practices for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether librarians at the University of Kansas are providing instruction through chat in order to develop best practices for training purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed a sample of chat transcripts using the “ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education” to determine whether librarians were utilizing opportunities for instruction in the chat medium. Using this analysis, they selected the best examples of instructional techniques.

Findings

Students were open to receiving instruction through chat. Librarians who were most successful in providing assistance to students demonstrated persistency and approachability in their interactions.

Practical implications

The authors developed a list of top ten practices for instruction through chat which can be used for training purposes.

Originality/value

Librarians need to continue to develop instructional techniques to create more opportunities for teaching moments in chat. The paper raises awareness of the impact of librarians' demeanor in the online environment.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Jeffrey Phillips

In any business process a firm begins with a concept or model of how it hopes to accomplish its goals to provide value to customers and participate in market successfully…

Abstract

In any business process a firm begins with a concept or model of how it hopes to accomplish its goals to provide value to customers and participate in market successfully. This model forms the basis of how the business is structured and organized, how it operates in the marketplace and its scope and limitations. In this article, we present the proposition that innovation, typically an unstructured initiative or task, requires its own model, and has a number of defined attributes. A successful innovation capability is based on defining these attributes and aligning them to the strategic goals of the organization and the intent or purpose of the innovation effort.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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