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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2014

Morteza Shokri-Ghasabeh and Nicholas Chileshe

A research study has been undertaken at the University of South Australia to introduce application of lessons learned process in construction contractors ' bidding…

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Abstract

Purpose

A research study has been undertaken at the University of South Australia to introduce application of lessons learned process in construction contractors ' bidding process in the context of knowledge management. The study aims to identify barriers to effectively capture lessons learned in Australian construction industry and how knowledge management can benefit from lessons learned application.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study has been undertaken through conducting a “methodological triangulation” and “interdisciplinary triangulation”. This involved an extensive literature review of knowledge management, organisation learning, lessons learned and associated processes and administration of a questionnaire to a sample of construction contractors operating in Australia to elicit opinions on the main barriers to capturing lessons learned, practices such as existence and retention of documentation procedures. A total of 81 useable responses were received from 450 organisations. Response data were subjected to descriptive and inferential statistics with correlation analysis to examine the strength of relationship among the barriers.

Findings

The top-3 barriers to the effective capturing of lessons learned were “lack of employee time”, “lack of resources” and “lack of clear guidelines”, whereas, “lack of management support” was the least ranked barrier. The study established that despite the majority of the ACCs having formal procedures for recording the tenders submitted and their outcomes, only a minority actually retained the lessons learned documentation for each project. The larger contractors were found to be more aware of the importance of lessons learned documentation. A comparative analysis with previous studies also found a disparity in the ranking of the barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The majority of the participants were small construction contractors in Australia. The reason is that the researchers were not aware of the contractors ' size prior to inviting them for participation in the research study. Second the findings may not generalize to other industries or to organisations operating in other countries.

Originality/value

The findings of this survey help ACCs to understand the importance of lessons learned documentation as part of lessons learned implementation and identify the barriers to effectively document their lessons learned. The study provides insights on the barriers and proposes advocated solutions in form of drivers and enablers (critical success factors) of organisational learning capturing among the Australian construction contractors. By reviewing the current literature, “post-project reviews” and “lessons learned” as important elements of organisation learning knowledge transfer, are addressed. Finally, contribution of this study to knowledge and practice has been discussed in this paper.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Tim Kotnour

Describes the organizational learning practices in a project management environment to ensure project quality. The project management and organizational learning processes…

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9276

Abstract

Describes the organizational learning practices in a project management environment to ensure project quality. The project management and organizational learning processes are described using the plan‐do‐study‐act (PDSA) cycle from quality management. Data from a survey of practicing project managers support the theory that organizational learning practices are associated with project knowledge, which is associated with project performance. Project knowledge is associated with learning that occurs both within and across projects. Managers can use this research to develop specific strategies to increase project success through learning. Researchers can use the results to understand how learning occurs in project environments. Implications are provided for project managers to use in focusing the learning activities of a project team.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 17 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Diana L. Burley and Gayatri Pandit

This case study aims to describe the lessons learned from the implementation of a Lessons Learned Knowledge Management System (LLKMS) at Global Safety Assistance (GSA), a

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Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to describe the lessons learned from the implementation of a Lessons Learned Knowledge Management System (LLKMS) at Global Safety Assistance (GSA), a US Department of Defense contractor working in support of a global security initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study was designed around five related objectives to examine the knowledge integration and transfer processes of GSA. Schwandt's Organizational Learning Systems Model (OLSM) was used to conceptualize the study and inform the findings. The OLSM describes the organizational transformation process whereby information is converted into useful knowledge. The authors worked collaboratively with GSA staff to gather observations about GSA knowledge integration strategies and their relative effectiveness through semi‐structured interviews, participant observation, and the analysis of internal documents.

Findings

GSA's LLKMS implementation strategy attempted to simultaneously change organizational culture, individual behavior, group communication patterns, and technology use. This strategy inhibited the implementation of the LLKMS because it underestimated the impact of key organizational realities such as the silo structure, existing communication patterns and information sharing processes, and critical elements of the organizational culture.

Originality/value

This paper discusses GSA's implementation strategy, identifies specific challenges resulting from the attempt to simultaneously change multiple organizational processes and individual behaviors, and provides practical recommendations for future LLKMS implementations.

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2017

Alejandro Uribe-Tirado and María Pinto

The purpose of this study has the aim of expanding lessons learned that were originally detected for information literacy (INFOLIT) programs in Ibero-American universities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study has the aim of expanding lessons learned that were originally detected for information literacy (INFOLIT) programs in Ibero-American universities (from Latin America, Spain and Portugal), this paper presents lessons learned for enhancing equivalent programs offered by other universities around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

As this paper is a comparative literature review, the methodology involved three stages. Initially, a documentary analysis was carried out to identify the texts published during the past five years – since 2013 – reporting a categorization of experiences and cases of international INFOLIT programs and their corresponding lessons learned. Second, we conducted a content analysis of these publications to uncover the classification, identification and frequency of the lessons learned. A third comparative step consisted of analyzing the similarities of these lessons when compared to those reported in similar research on Ibero-American universities (Uribe-Tirado, 2013).

Findings

From the 75 lessons learned from INFOLIT programs in Ibero-American universities, 65 lessons (87 per cent) were identified as also present in universities elsewhere. These similarities give an account of the possibilities for collaborative learning and benchmarking that INFOLIT programs could achieve with regard to content, pedagogy, learning objects and evaluation if there were more networking and more common participation in sharing experiences, with appropriate adaptations to contextual, technological and idiomatic variations.

Originality/value

As a comparative literature review, this paper makes a significant contribution to the international advancement of INFOLIT in higher education, as it correlates the lessons learned from INFOLIT programs in Ibero-American universities with those from other countries. This provides a global view of the lessons learned about INFOLIT, which to date have not been reported with such a wide scope and number of lessons.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Vaughan Michell and Jane McKenzie

To increase the spread and reuse of lessons learned (LLs), the purpose of this paper is to develop a standardised information structure to facilitate concise capture of…

Abstract

Purpose

To increase the spread and reuse of lessons learned (LLs), the purpose of this paper is to develop a standardised information structure to facilitate concise capture of the critical elements needed to engage secondary learners and help them apply lessons to their contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Three workshops with industry practitioners, an analysis of over 60 actual lessons from private and public sector organisations and seven practitioner interviews provided evidence of actual practice. Design science was used to develop a repeatable/consistent information model of LL content/structure. Workshop analysis and theory provided the coding template. Situation theory and normative analysis were used to define the knowledge and rule logic to standardise fields.

Findings

Comparing evidence from practice against theoretical prescriptions in the literature highlighted important enhancements to the standard LL model. These were a consistent/concise rule and context structure, appropriate emotional language, reuse and control criteria to ensure lessons were transferrable and reusable in new situations.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are based on a limited sample. Long-term benefits of standardisation and use need further research. A larger sample/longitudinal usage study is planned.

Practical implications

The implementation of the LL structure was well-received in one government user site and other industry user sites are pending. Practitioners validated the design logic for improving capture and reuse of lessons to render them easily translatable to a new learner’s context.

Originality/value

The new LL structure is uniquely grounded in user needs, developed from existing best practice and is an original application of normative and situation theory to provide consistent rule logic for context/content structure.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Maria Laura Angelini and Neus Álvarez

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of pre-service teachers (PSTs) who used lesson study on a five-week school-based teaching placement. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of pre-service teachers (PSTs) who used lesson study on a five-week school-based teaching placement. The paper analyses 12 undergraduate PSTs’ perceptions of the way lesson study affected classroom-based teaching of English as a foreign language to pre-school and primary school.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study is carried out from the responses to a semi-structured interview to the PSTs, and written responses to the open-ended question: What are your perceptions of lesson study?

Findings

This paper provides empirical insights about the way lesson study reinforced the PSTs’ classroom management and lesson planning skills. The case-pupils’ responses to the PSTs’ questions post-treatment indicated that games and active techniques in the classroom led to high retention of the taught content. Nevertheless, PSTs’ evaluations of pupils’ learning outcomes require further development. These evaluations often resulted in vague perceptions of overall lesson performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides hints of how case-pupils better learned and how PSTs did the observations and performed. However, the results cannot be generalized.

Originality/value

The researchers sustain that the teaching degrees should encourage critical thinking in PSTs’ self-evaluations to reduce the focus on standards and expectations. It is believed that if the pressure of designing perfect lessons is removed from the equation, and instead, sensible and realistic lessons are planned, PSTs will be more inclined to learn and respond resourcefully, creatively, and resolutely to classroom situations.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

James Calleja and Patrick Camilleri

The research reported in this paper brings forth the experiences of three teachers working in different schools. These teachers learned about lesson study through a course…

Abstract

Purpose

The research reported in this paper brings forth the experiences of three teachers working in different schools. These teachers learned about lesson study through a course offered at the University of Malta while, at the same time, leading a lesson study with colleagues at their school. With the COVID-19 outbreak, these teachers had, out of necessity, to adopt and accommodate for their lesson study to an exclusive online approach. This paper, hence, focuses on teachers' learning as they shifted their lesson study online.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study that delves into the experiences and perceptual insights that these teachers manifested in shifting to an exclusive online lesson study situation. Data collection is derived from a focus group discussion, teacher reflective entries and detailed reports documenting the lesson study process and experiences. Employing technological frames as the theoretical lens, a description-analysis-interpretation approach was employed to analyse and interpret reflections and grounded experiential perceptions that the respondents disclosed during their lesson study journey.

Findings

Notwithstanding their initial discerned sense of loss and unpreparedness of being constrained to migrate lesson study to exclusive online means, teachers eventually recognised that digitally mediated collaborative practices enhanced self-reflection about the lesson study process. Therefore, the extraordinary situation that the teachers in this study experienced not only disrupted their modus operandi but also allowed them to discern new opportunities for learning about digital technology use in lesson study.

Practical implications

Disruption, brought about by unforeseen circumstances, takes teachers and professional development facilitators out of their comfort zones, invariably helping them grow out of their limitations and rethink lesson study practices.

Originality/value

Intentionally driven disruptions prompt teachers to resolve their dissatisfactory situations by thinking out of the box, eventually helping them to improve their professional practices.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Tatang Suratno

Since its introduction in early 2000s, lesson study has been viewed as a promising and powerful approach to professional development and school improvement in Indonesia…

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Abstract

Purpose

Since its introduction in early 2000s, lesson study has been viewed as a promising and powerful approach to professional development and school improvement in Indonesia. The purpose of this article is to discuss the historical development and unique perspective of lesson study at Indonesia University of Education.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a systematic review of the related literature to analyse practitioners and official point of views regarding adaptability and sustainability of the lesson study effort, the author portrays the progress and challenge faced by practitioners of lesson study in Indonesia. The author also points out its “existence proof” through the “story of adaptation” in order to describe the “steady change and improvement” and the “local proof route” in practice.

Findings

The review shows consecutive changes that started from reforming student learning, teachers’ learning and empowering the learning community, though reaching the core of instructional improvement is indeed challenging.

Originality/value

In this paper there are two substantial lessons learned, i.e. teaching practice and reflective practice are explicated to underlie the proposed framework of substantive aspects of lesson study. Key factors are also highlighted to develop further a valuable and sustained teacher education and development in Indonesia.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2014

Craig A. Hughes

This chapter explores the concept of annotated lesson plans. Teacher candidates annotated why modifications were made to their lesson plans to support emergent bilinguals…

Abstract

This chapter explores the concept of annotated lesson plans. Teacher candidates annotated why modifications were made to their lesson plans to support emergent bilinguals. They included the research and theory to support such modifications. This research demonstrates the impact of annotated lesson plans on candidates in connecting their understanding of learning and language acquisition theories to actual classroom practices. Two questions guided the research: (1) Would annotated lesson plans assist teacher candidates in connecting language and learning theories to the modifications made in their lesson plans? (2) What was the impact of creating the annotated lesson plan on the teacher candidates, as expressed through their self-reflection of the process? Founded on the base of naturalistic inquiry (Lincoln & Guba, 1985), the data collected was contextualized within the frame of a teacher candidate course. Annotated lesson plans and accompanying reflection papers were gathered as data. These items were analyzed based on the guidelines established by Lincoln and Guba (1985) and Spradley (1980). Teacher candidates connected theories to their planned lessons. They demonstrated and expressed better understanding of related theories and methods. While a minority of the candidates expressed concerns with their overall preparation to educate emergent bilingual students, the majority of the candidates felt the lesson plans provided them with greater confidence in meeting the needs of such students. The implications of the study are that annotated lesson plans can better prepare preservice teachers for teaching emergent bilinguals.

Details

Research on Preparing Preservice Teachers to Work Effectively with Emergent Bilinguals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-265-4

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Yanping Fang and Hongyan Wang

A first post-WALS attempt at a thematic analysis of the conference presentations since its first annual meeting in 2007, this paper aims to achieve two major purposes…

Abstract

Purpose

A first post-WALS attempt at a thematic analysis of the conference presentations since its first annual meeting in 2007, this paper aims to achieve two major purposes: first, to capture the trends of spread and diffusion of lesson and learning studies globally and second, to draw useful implications for future conferences.

Design/methodology/approach

A thematic analysis using NVIVO12.0 coding on all forms of conference presentations found in the WALS 2019 Conference Programme was conducted. Representative cases were selected from paper and symposiums sessions to support the claims generated from the analysis.

Findings

The study provides an evidence-based confirmation of the global spread and diffusion of lesson and learning studies. It uncovers findings key to the initial spread and continued diffusion; examines funding as a mechanism enabling university–school research relationships, models of adaptations and issues of sustainability; surfaces the theoretical models and methods adopted in paper and symposia presentations. The current situation, lessons learned and possible implications for future WALS conferences are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Inform research on practical cases.

Practical implications

Lessons learned are discussed.

Social implications

These are possible implications for future WALS conferences.

Originality/value

The originality lies in its being the first WALS post-conference analysis aiming at identifying substantive themes with potential to draw important implications for future research and subsequent years' conferences.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

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