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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Jung Eun Lee and Leslie Stoel

Retailers are known to present tensile price claims (TPCs) stating high discounts to entice shoppers. Prior research on TPCs suggests that high TPC discounts increase…

Abstract

Purpose

Retailers are known to present tensile price claims (TPCs) stating high discounts to entice shoppers. Prior research on TPCs suggests that high TPC discounts increase purchase intentions. However, the current study proposes, first, that the TPC discount shifts expected price discount (EPD) and, second, that the gap between the actual price discount and the EPD influence perceptions of the discount deal. Support for these propositions would suggest that high TPC discounts will only be effective when they closely match the actual price discount. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to evaluate the effectiveness of exaggerated maximum-discount TPCs.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were used. Study 1 investigated the effect of exposure to a TPC on EPD. Study 2 examined discount discrepancy as a mediator of the relationship between a TPC and consumer perceptions (i.e. perceived savings and price fairness) and purchase intentions. PROCESS and ANOVA were used for the analysis.

Findings

This research showed that exposure to a TPC influenced consumers’ EPDs. As TPC discount increased, EPD increased and the discount discrepancy (i.e. actual price discount minus EPD) decreased (and, in some cases, became negative). The discount discrepancy influenced consumer perceptions of savings and fairness, as well as purchase intentions. Consequently, when the actual price discount encountered was not as large as the advertised TPC discount, the results showed a negative, indirect influence of exaggerated maximum-discount TPCs on consumers’ discount perceptions, mediated by the discount discrepancy.

Originality/value

Previous TPC studies found that the size of the TPC discount positively influences consumers’ discount perceptions, implying that larger discounts are more effective. However, this approach does not take into consideration the notion that larger TPC discounts increase consumer expectations about the size of discount and these expectations are used as a frame to evaluate a discount deal. The findings of the current research show a negative, indirect influence of exaggerated TPC discount on consumer perceptions and purchase intentions through discount discrepancy. Therefore, this study provides a new perspective to explain the influence of TPC discount size on consumer perceptions.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Pielah Kim, Hua Chang, Rajiv Vaidyanathan and Leslie Stoel

Increasing industry interest in visual artists and commercial brand collaborations has heightened the need for research on exactly how visual art can add meaning to brands…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing industry interest in visual artists and commercial brand collaborations has heightened the need for research on exactly how visual art can add meaning to brands in ways that enhance brand value to existing consumers and potentially reach new consumers. Consumers are known to select brands on the basis of how well these brands reflect their own personalities. The purpose of this research is to understand whether brand alliances with artists exhibiting distinct personalities can make brands more attractive to consumers whose personalities do not currently match the brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments are used to examine the impact of artists’ personality (in)congruence on consumers’ perceptions of the brand and purchase intentions of the brand’s products.

Findings

The results show that consumers whose personalities do not match the brand’s current personality are likely to alter their view of a brand when the brand partners with an artist whose personality matches with that of the consumers’. This happens without negatively affecting the brand personality perceptions of current consumers who already identify with the brand.

Practical implications

When seeking to attract a new target segment, brands can ally with visual artists who convey a personality that matches that of the new target segment.

Originality/value

This paper adds to a nascent literature on the power of artist–brand alliances, and demonstrates that these partnerships need not only be between artists and brands with consistent personalities but can also effectively be used to target new consumers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2017

Tae-Im Han and Leslie Stoel

The purpose of this research is to examine the effectiveness of using social media to increase knowledge about and motivate purchase behaviors of fair-trade products…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the effectiveness of using social media to increase knowledge about and motivate purchase behaviors of fair-trade products, focusing specifically on the influence of information format (media richness) and characteristics (information quality and quantity).

Design/methodology/approach

One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to test whether consumer responses differ based on the information format. Additionally, structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed to examine the relationship among constructs of the hierarchy of effects model.

Findings

Participants exposed to the video format (rich media) had higher scores on information quality, subjective knowledge and emotion than those exposed to the text only format (lean media). SEM results showed that both objective and subjective knowledge had significant influences on emotion and emotion, in turn, had a significant influence on purchase intentions. In addition, information quantity and quality had direct and significant effects on emotion.

Originality/value

This study focused on the crucial role of knowledge related to fair-trade products by distinguishing two different types: objective and subjective knowledge. Despite the growing body of literature concerning socially responsible consumer behavior (SRCB), there are very few studies that specifically examine the differential impact of objective and subjective knowledge on consumer behaviors. Furthermore, the original hierarchy of effects model does not include antecedents of the cognitive dimension. Because developing knowledge plays a key role in motivating SRCB, this study added characteristics of information to the model to examine their influence on knowledge level.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Patricia Huddleston, Linda K. Good and Leslie Stoel

Poland appears to be an attractive consumer market, based on strong demand for consumer products during the past several years. However, this may not be the case for…

Abstract

Poland appears to be an attractive consumer market, based on strong demand for consumer products during the past several years. However, this may not be the case for Western marketers, because of the influence of strong feelings of national pride on behavior of Polish consumers. Measures of consumer ethnocentrism may provide Western marketers with the information necessary to target consumers who do not allow nationalistic feelings to influence product quality evaluation and purchase behavior. Also, the necessity of the product to consumers may provide marketers with clues on which products will be accepted in the Polish marketplace. The purpose of this study is to learn, for various consumer products, whether Polish consumers’ perceptions of product quality differ based on consumer ethnocentric tendency, product necessity, and country of origin. A repeated measures ANOVA test provides empirical evidence that perceived quality differs by necessity, by product, by country, and consumer ethnocentrism influences quality perceptions of Polish consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Leslie Stoel and Kyu Hye Lee

As the use of Web‐based learning technologies to supplement college classroom instruction has increased, a key issue for faculty members is how to entice their students to…

Abstract

As the use of Web‐based learning technologies to supplement college classroom instruction has increased, a key issue for faculty members is how to entice their students to accept these technologies. Research suggests that student experience with the technologies may influence their acceptance. The technology acceptance model was used as a framework to study the effect of student experience with Web‐based learning technologies on their acceptance of those technologies. Analysis showed that experience with the technology positively influenced perceived ease of use. Perceptions of ease of use and usefulness positively influenced attitudes towards the technology. Attitude positively influenced intention to use, and intention positively influenced usage. Results suggest that as student experience with a technology increases, they perceive it to be easier to use and more useful, and therefore, are more likely to use it. When introducing the technology, instructors should emphasize how easy the technology is to use and how useful it is in improving grades.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Leslie Stoel

Observes that the group size of some US retail hardware cooperatives increased during the 1990s, as cooperative managements strove to increase the quantity and quality of…

Abstract

Observes that the group size of some US retail hardware cooperatives increased during the 1990s, as cooperative managements strove to increase the quantity and quality of group members. For example, a 1997 merger doubled the membership of one group. Large size was deemed necessary to achieve the economies of scope and scale needed to compete in an intense retail marketplace. Group research generally shows that large size has a negative impact on group dynamics. The current study examines size of retail hardware cooperative groups in relation to group identification, communication frequency, and relationship effectiveness. Findings show that size does not influence the relationships between the variables in the study. Also, a member’s level of group identification is a primary driver of perceptions of relationship effectiveness. The higher the identification with the group, the more effective the relationship is perceived to be by the member.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Leslie Stoel, SoWon Jeong and Stan Ernst

The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of small, rural retailers based on personal beliefs about business use of the internet and to identify similarities and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of small, rural retailers based on personal beliefs about business use of the internet and to identify similarities and differences between the retailer subgroups in attitude, perceptual performance, and behavioral intention to use the internet.

Design/methodology/approach

A mail survey is completed by owners of small, independently owned retailers in rural communities across the USA.

Findings

Cluster analysis reveals three types of retailers: optimists, efficiency minded, and skeptics. Differences in attitudes towards use of the internet and intention to use the internet for purposes of strategic positioning are found across the groups.

Research limitations/implications

The sample frame consists of small, independently owned retailers in rural communities, the response rate is low, and results will not generalize to small retailers in urban areas.

Practical implications

The stories of optimist retailers can show efficiency‐minded retailers how to gain greater benefit from use of the internet. The skeptical retailers are not likely to adopt the internet even when important others, such as their customers, want them to. These retailers may need to be sold on what the internet can do for retail performance of their specific business. An individualistic approach would likely be the only salient appeal to these retailers, since they are not socially compliant or socially embedded.

Originality/value

This paper produces a typology of small, rural retailers and provides information on internet use of such retailers, both of which are new to the literature.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Mi Sook Lee, Loren V. Geistfeld and Leslie Stoel

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether cultural differences could explain differences between Korean and American apparel web sites.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether cultural differences could explain differences between Korean and American apparel web sites.

Design/methodology/approach

The contents of American and Korean apparel web sites are compared. The chi‐square test of independence is used to determine significant differences between the contents of the two countries apparel web sites.

Findings

The paper finds that American web sites provide specific information related to products and online purchase of products, while Korean web sites provide information related to consumers' relationships to the larger community. This difference could be due to cultural differences: the Korean culture tends to reflect collectivism while the American culture tends to reflect individualism.

Research limitations/implications

The fundamental limitation of this research is that it is descriptive.

Practical implications

This research suggests that transcultural web sites may not be appropriate and that e‐tailers need to be sensitive to cultural differences.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of this paper is the identification of clear differences between Korean and American apparel web sites and that Hofstede's collectivism/individualism cultural value is a possible explanation of the difference between the two countries.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jihye Park and Leslie Stoel

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of brand familiarity, the number of pieces of product information presented on a web site, and previous online apparel…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of brand familiarity, the number of pieces of product information presented on a web site, and previous online apparel shopping experience on perceived risk and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiment was 2 (brand familiarity)×2 (information availability) factorial design and 166 students participated in this study.

Findings

Multivariate and univariate analyses found a significant effect of brand familiarity and previous experience on perceived risk and purchase intention, and no effect of amount of information on perceived risk and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

Participants may not have carefully considered the product information because the experiment was not an actual purchase situation, although a scenario was given. In future studies, creating an actual purchase situation may be necessary to investigate the effect of the amount of information available on the web sites on perceived risk and decision making.

Practical implications

The present study suggests that internet retailers should capitalize on the power of their brand names. Multi‐channel retailers may be able to derive significant advantages from brand familiarity among their customers.

Orginality/value

This study has added to the in‐home shopping literature by extending findings of previous research to internet shopping. Findings suggest that internal information, specifically familiarity with brands offered online and previous experience of shopping online, influence perceptions of risk associated with shopping online, as well as intentions to purchase online.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Sejin Ha and Leslie Stoel

The objectives of this paper are to: examine e‐shopping quality dimensions; explore how e‐shopping quality factors influence consumer shopping outcomes (e‐shopping…

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this paper are to: examine e‐shopping quality dimensions; explore how e‐shopping quality factors influence consumer shopping outcomes (e‐shopping satisfaction and e‐shopping intention); and test the moderating effects of consumer experiential e‐shopping motives on the e‐shopping quality – e‐shopping outcomes links within the context of online apparel retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 298 college students in the USA using a self‐administered online survey.

Findings

Among four e‐shopping quality factors identified (privacy/security, web site content/functionality, customer service, and experiential/atmospheric), web site content/functionality and atmospheric/experiential quality have significant impact on e‐shopping satisfaction contributing to e‐shopping intention, while privacy/security and customer service have significant impact on e‐shopping intention but not on e‐shopping satisfaction. Furthermore, this study provides some support for the moderating roles that experiential e‐shopping motives plays in the e‐shopping quality – e‐shopping outcomes links.

Research limitation/implications

This paper shows that experiential e‐shopping motives as an individual characteristic play a role in controlling the dynamics among e‐shopping quality, e‐shopping satisfaction, and e‐shopping intention. However, the data consisting of self‐reported measures from a single segment of online retail industry warrants caution in generalization in relation to common method bias.

Practical implications

This paper entails useful implications for internet‐ and multichannel retail marketers delivering apparel/fashion goods to better understand the online consumer response process and determine effective e‐store management strategies that reflect the differing customer evaluation processes.

Originality/value

This study extends and complements the e‐tail service literature by examining whether and how experiential e‐shopping motives moderate the relationships among e‐shopping quality dimensions, e‐shopping satisfaction, and e‐shopping intention.

1 – 10 of 39