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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Grant Samkin and Lesley Stainbank

Positioned within a framework of challenges facing universities, this paper aims to focus on challenges faced by teachers of accounting as a business discipline to ensure…

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Abstract

Purpose

Positioned within a framework of challenges facing universities, this paper aims to focus on challenges faced by teachers of accounting as a business discipline to ensure it remains relevant in a fast-moving and changing environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a variety of sources, this paper explores a number of issues surrounding teaching and learning in the current university environment. The seven papers that make up the special issue are located within a framework which is used to illustrate how each one contributes to the field. This paper is primarily discursive in nature.

Findings

The theoretical, methodological and empirical approaches used in the papers that make up this special issue are described. In addition, the paper suggests that to remain relevant, teaching and learning will remain an important area for future research.

Practical implications

This paper on teaching and learning is of interest to accounting teachers and researchers, university managers and members of the accounting profession.

Originality/value

This special issue provides a range of examples of research relevant to teaching and learning and sets an agenda for future research.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2020

Sonnette Smith, Adelia Carstens and Lesley Stainbank

This paper aims to explore the individual and social learning experiences of first-year accounting students studying in English as an additional language. The challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the individual and social learning experiences of first-year accounting students studying in English as an additional language. The challenges of these students relating to listening, reading, speaking and writing in English, and the impact of these on their academic outcomes, are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study design was used. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 students, both academically successful and unsuccessful, who had completed the first year. A thematic analysis of the data was conducted and a hybrid approach of deductive and inductive coding was used to interpret the data. This entailed the application of a language skills-based framework of teaching and learning to the first-order process of coding. An iterative and reflective process allowed themes to emerge from the data. These themes, in turn, triggered second-order codes that resonated with aspects of the interactionist approach to second language acquisition (SLA).

Findings

The themes that emerged indicated that students’ ability to interact with their study material, and their exposure to positive verbal interaction opportunities in both formal and informal contexts, may have contributed to their academic success.

Practical implications

It is recommended that an interactionist perspective be considered when designing curriculum resources and accounting language learning activities for first-year accounting students.

Originality/value

It is anticipated that the results will contribute towards building a bridge between accounting education and SLA research and provide a more informed linguistic foundation for incorporating language skills into the accounting curriculum.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Lesley Stainbank and Kerry-Lee Gurr

The purpose of this exploratory study is to describe the use of social media platforms in a first-year accounting course at a South African university and provide evidence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to describe the use of social media platforms in a first-year accounting course at a South African university and provide evidence on whether students found these social networking sites useful.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses survey research to determine students’ usage of two social media platforms (Facebook and Twitter) and their perceptions of these platforms’ usefulness in a first-year accounting course.

Findings

The study found that the time spent on the two social media platforms does not detract from the time spent on preparation for the first-year accounting course. Students’ perceptions on the usefulness of these platforms showed support by all students for using social media to provide career information, but not all students perceived the platforms to be useful for communication and teaching and learning. While no statistically significant differences were found in the students’ responses based on gender, a number of statistically significant differences were found when the results were analysed according to language. Students whose home language was not English found the two social media platforms more useful for some aspects of communication, teaching and learning and for career guidance than English-speaking students.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire was only administered to students on one campus who had actually accessed the social media platforms. Therefore, the results are not generalisable beyond this study.

Practical implications

The study shows that students whose home language is not English perceived the platforms more useful for communication, some teaching and learning aspects and for career guidance in a first-year accounting course. This may be helpful to other accounting teachers faced with student disruptions, large classes or high numbers of international students whose first language is not English, and who need to communicate with all their students.

Originality/value

The study adds to the discourse on the usefulness of social media platforms in a tertiary education setting, and more particularly, in a first-year accounting course in South Africa.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Lesley Stainbank and Devi Dutt Tewari

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextual analysis of the professional accounting education programmes in South Africa and India by benchmarking both programmes…

1043

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextual analysis of the professional accounting education programmes in South Africa and India by benchmarking both programmes to the International Education Standards (IESs) of the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC).

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology is a qualitative archival approach extracting information from secondary data (Statements of Membership Obligations’ compliance questionnaires available on the IFAC web site and information from the web sites of the relevant professional accountancy bodies).

Findings

With regards to the IESs, the study found that both countries comply with the standards, although important differences occur. In South Africa, most of the education takes place during the university phase; and while both countries cover the content requirements, India covers the acquisition of professional skills more formally; ethics is taught and examined in both countries; both countries require a three year training contract; both countries have a final examination but the content of the examinations are different; and South Africa requires more continuous professional development than India. These findings, when related to India's and South Africa's relative positions on certain of the Global Competitiveness Indices may indicate that India could learn from the South African accountancy education model in order to strengthen the Indian position with regards to auditing and reporting standards.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that it did not investigate the quality of the relative education programmes and it benchmarks both programmes at a single point in time.

Practical implications

India could strengthen its accounting profession by implementing some of the South African aspects of its education model. South African could consider adopting the flexibility in the entry requirements in the Indian education model in order to increase the number of accountants in South Africa. These findings may also be useful to other developing countries to identify practices which could be adopted if suitable in their respective countries.

Originality/value

The study is original as accountancy education programmes in India and South Africa have not been contrasted before. In view of their similar colonial background and the fact that both countries are major economic and political forces in their respective regions, the value of this study is that it provides useful and relevant information to India, South Africa and other countries with similar economic and social backgrounds.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Haruna Maama and Ferina Marimuthu

Given the significant role of both integrated reporting and cost of capital in the survival and prosperity of a firm, it is essential to understand their relationship by…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the significant role of both integrated reporting and cost of capital in the survival and prosperity of a firm, it is essential to understand their relationship by investigating whether integrated reporting influences the cost of capital of a firm. This research paper aims to examine the impact of integrated reporting practice on the cost of capital of listed firms in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

Design/methodology/approach

The study covered a period of 10 years from 2009 to 2018. One hundred and forty-seven listed firms in 10 SSA countries were used for the study. The study employed panel data analysis and utilised a dynamic estimation technique called the generalised method of moments.

Findings

The evidence shows that integrated reporting has a negative relationship with cost of capital, indicating integrated reporting can reduce firms' cost of capital. The results further showed that social, governance and environmental disclosures all have negative relationships with cost of capital, suggesting that firms that make these disclosures would have a lower cost of capital. These results are consistent with signalling theory, which holds that firms send a positive signal to the market about their performance and prospects when they provide information relating to value creation, predominantly environmental, social and governance issues.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of the study is the selection of only English-speaking countries. French-speaking countries may have a different reporting practice, hence a different effect on the cost of capital.

Practical implications

This study contributes to policy development on integrated reporting in SSA and informs key stakeholders involved in promoting and supporting the adoption of integrated reporting in Africa.

Originality/value

The findings from this paper consolidate existing research in integrated reporting and cost of capital by providing empirical evidence on the relationship between integrated reporting, its components and the cost of capital from emerging economies. This study contributes to the understanding of investors' reactions to integrated reporting. Further, it fills a gap in the non-availability of literature on the relative impact of the various components of integrated reporting.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

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