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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Lesley Patterson

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2395

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Lesley Patterson

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254

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Women in Management Review, vol. 20 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Lesley Patterson

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277

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Lesley Patterson

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192

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Lesley Patterson

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340

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Avril Bell, Lesley Patterson, Morgan Dryburgh and David Johnston

Natural disaster stories narrate unsettling natural events and proffer scripts for social action in the face of unforeseen and overwhelming circumstances. The purpose of…

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1313

Abstract

Purpose

Natural disaster stories narrate unsettling natural events and proffer scripts for social action in the face of unforeseen and overwhelming circumstances. The purpose of this study is to investigate stories of natural disasters recounted for New Zealand school children in the School Journal during its first 100 years of publication.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis is used to categorise the disaster event and to identify two distinct periods of disaster stories – imperial and national. Textual analysis of indicative stories from each period centres on the construction of social scripts for child readers.

Findings

In the imperial period tales of individual heroism and self‐sacrifice predominate, while the national period is characterised by stories of ordinary families, community solidarity and survival. Through this investigation of natural disaster stories for children, the paper identifies the shifting models of heroic identity offered to New Zealand children through educational texts.

Originality/value

This study adds to the existing literature on the School Journal and to the broader study of the history of imperialist and nationalist education in New Zealand. In these times of increased disaster awareness it also draws attention to the significance of disaster narratives in offering social scripts for children to draw on in the event of an actual disaster experience.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Jacqueline Scott

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729

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Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Graham Whittaker, Lesley Ledden and Stavros P. Kalafatis

The objectives of this paper are twofold: to add to the debate regarding conceptualisation and operationalisation of value within a professional service domain, and to…

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4288

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this paper are twofold: to add to the debate regarding conceptualisation and operationalisation of value within a professional service domain, and to contribute to the relatively sparse literature dealing with the functional relationship between determinants and outcomes of value with specific emphasis on the value to satisfaction and intention to re‐purchase relationship in professional services.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretically grounded model has been developed that comprises three antecedents of value (conceptualised as a higher order construct of six dimensions) and satisfaction both of which impact on intention. The model has been tested, using partial least squares, on 78 responses obtained through an email survey carried out amongst executives of the top 300 UK‐based companies listed in the Times 1,000.

Findings

The results indicate that although perceived value is a multi‐dimensional construct treating value as a unified construct may lead to confounding effects. Although further research is needed it is suggested that different dimensions of value act at different levels of the value hierarchy and differentially reflect process and outcome value creation forces in professional services.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the debate surrounding conceptualisations of the value construct by offering empirical support as to its formative nature. Furthermore, this is the first attempt to examine differences in the nomological relationships of value when it is treated as a single higher order construct and when the higher order structure of value is relaxed allowing its dimensions to directly interact with antecedents and consequences.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Lesley White and Venkata Yanamandram

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to continue purchasing from their existing…

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10208

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to continue purchasing from their existing service provider in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This review paper synthesises the findings from previous studies on switching barriers, and relationship variables, dependence, and calculative commitment.

Findings

Five major factors deter customers from switching to an alternative service provider: switching costs; interpersonal relationships; the attractiveness of alternatives; service recovery; and inertia. These factors are mediated by dependence and calculative commitment.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive study of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to remain behaviourally loyal to a service provider in the B2B services sector. This important study has significance for marketers in developing strategies for customer retention and service recovery.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Venkata Yanamandram and Lesley White

To investigate the determinants of behavioural brand loyalty amongst dissatisfied customers in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

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6708

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the determinants of behavioural brand loyalty amongst dissatisfied customers in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted, with 28 personal interviews undertaken with managers who are involved in the choice of service providers. The respondents belonged to 24 organisations located in Australia. Template analysis and eyeballing were techniques used to analyse the data collected.

Findings

Assessment of the reasons why dissatisfied customers stayed with the service providers resulted in six categories. The categories were found to be, in order of decreasing frequency, impact of alternative providers, switching costs (18), others (17), inertia (14), investment in relationships (13), and service recovery (13). The results not only confirmed factors found in the literature, but also uncovered 11 other factors.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size, whilst appropriate for qualitative research, should be considered adequate only for exploratory analysis and a further quantitative study is needed to validate the study.

Practical implications

This study is important for those firms who have many prospective switchers because it is important to understand why these customers stay, and to what extent such firms can discourage such customers from leaving in both positive and negative ways. For those service firms that are attempting to attract these prospective switchers, an understanding of why they do not switch is important, as it will enable them to develop strategies to overcome these switching barriers and gain market share.

Originality/value

This research is the first study to investigate in a single model a range of barriers to switching in a B2B services context. The results that confirmed categories found in the literature also discovered 11 other factors not evident in the extant literature.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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