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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Leonardi Louis, Ruth Fairchild and Anita Setarehnejad

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of alternative ingredients in three different gluten-free breads (GFBs) available in the UK market with regard to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of alternative ingredients in three different gluten-free breads (GFBs) available in the UK market with regard to their quality attributes and consumer preference.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different GFB samples purchased from a UK retailer were visually assessed. Their quality attributes and consumer acceptability were analysed via an untrained taste panel (n=35) on Day 1. Texture was compared using a texture analyser on Days 1 and 8, to examine the differences between samples and the effects of ingredients towards staling.

Findings

Results from visual inspection showed that ingredients affected the appearance of samples, in terms of crumb structure, and both crumb and crust colour. Firmness and springiness were significantly different (p<0.05, p=0.007) between samples on Days 1 and 8 although no significant difference existed within each individual sample. Sensory analysis showed no significant differences between samples with respect to denseness, chewiness, crumbliness, dryness and overall preference.

Research limitations/implications

The ingredient combination in each bread differed, and thus it is not clear if the results are due to the incorporation of individual ingredient or a combination of them.

Practical implications

Results of this study will help food industry to make an easier decision on gluten-free ingredients.

Social implications

It will help people with coeliac disease and those who wish to remove gluten from their diets.

Originality/value

Overall, the study showed that the use of different ingredients affected the appearance, firmness and springiness of three GFBs available in the UK market. However, it did not affect denseness, chewiness, crumbliness, dryness or consumer preference. This indicates that a number of ingredient combinations are possible in the manufacturing of acceptable GFB.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2020

Stuart Thomas

The current study examines the effect of socialization on the inculcation of professional accounting values. Three sources of socialization are examined: public accounting…

Abstract

The current study examines the effect of socialization on the inculcation of professional accounting values. Three sources of socialization are examined: public accounting firms, non-public accounting firms (industry) and accounting professional associations. Specifically, the study compares the professionalism of public and industry accountants. Consistent with expectations, the results suggest that public accountants have stronger beliefs in professional autonomy and self-regulation than industry accountants, and that industry accountants have stronger beliefs in professional affiliation, social obligation and professional dedication than public accountants. It was hypothesized that while professional associations promote all professional values, public accounting firms and industry have different promoting priorities. Public accounting firms foster beliefs in self-regulation and professional autonomy while industry opposes these values, resulting in public accountants having stronger beliefs in these values. Conversely, it was posited that industry encourage beliefs in professional affiliation, social obligation and professional dedication to a greater extent than public accounting firms. The result is that the industry accountants have stronger beliefs in these values than the public accountants. Investigating these issues increase understanding of the importance of the socialization process fostering accounting professional values and identifying areas of potential conflict and reinforcement accountants face when working in public accounting and industry.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-669-8

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Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Gretchen Spreitzer, Peter Bacevice, Hilary Hendricks and Lyndon Garrett

With increasingly precarious work contracts, more remote work, and additional flexibility in the timing of the workday, the new world of work is creating both relational…

Abstract

With increasingly precarious work contracts, more remote work, and additional flexibility in the timing of the workday, the new world of work is creating both relational opportunities and relational challenges for modern workers. In this chapter, we pair recent research on human thriving with trends we observe in organizations' efforts to create and maintain a sense of community. Key in these efforts is a new kind of built environment – the coworking space – which brings together remote and independent workers and, increasingly, traditional employees as well. We show that in curating community, or perhaps even the possibility of community, coworking spaces may support the interpersonal learning and vitality that help workers to thrive.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-083-7

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Marie Marchand and Louis Raymond

Considering performance measurement and management systems (PMMS) to be “mission-critical” information systems for many business organisations, calls have been made for…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering performance measurement and management systems (PMMS) to be “mission-critical” information systems for many business organisations, calls have been made for researchers to shift from studying the use of such systems to studying their “effective” use, and in so doing to focus on their characterisation as information technology (IT) artefacts. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In seeking to answer these calls, the authors apply Burton-Jones and Grange’s theoretical framework to study the dimensions, contextual drivers and benefits of the effective use of PMMS. This is done through a field study of 16 PMMS artefacts as used in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Findings

In characterising, contextualising and valuing the effective use of PMMS, this study provides answers to the following questions: What constitutes the effective use of PMMS? What are the user, artefactual and task-related drivers of such use? And what are the benefits for SMEs of using performance measurement and management (PMM) systems effectively?

Practical implications

With regard to the design of a PMMS artefact, the findings imply that one should concentrate on those artefactual attributes that most enable informed action on the part of owner-managers, as it is these actions have the greater consequences for the realisation of IT business value in SMEs. Moreover, the nomological network resulting from this research provides the theoretical and methodological underpinnings of a diagnostic tool meant to develop the PMM function in SMEs.

Originality/value

This study provides further empirical grounding and understanding. This study provides further empirical grounding and understanding of the concept of effective use, as well as further applicability and actionability to this concept and to the nomological network of its dimensions, contextual drivers and benefits in the case of PMMS and in the context of SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Thomas Hippler

Seeks to investigate the adjustment of business relocatees to their host environment. It explores the facets of the relocatees’ adjustment in the following three regions…

Abstract

Seeks to investigate the adjustment of business relocatees to their host environment. It explores the facets of the relocatees’ adjustment in the following three regions: Germany as the home country and destination for domestic assignments, Western Europe and other countries. It further investigates the stress levels the relocatees display and their motives for accepting or actively seeking relocation. If the results of this survey suggest the existence of Western Europe as a distinct assignment location, these findings will form a valuable basis for the development of policies for intra‐European personnel transfers, particularly in the area of selection, training, development and compensation.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 24 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Eleanor Peters

Abstract

Details

The Use and Abuse of Music: Criminal Records
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-002-8

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Abstract

Details

Transport Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84-855844-1

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Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Som Sekhar Bhattacharyya and Sumi Jha

Abstract

Details

Strategic Leadership Models and Theories: Indian Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-259-2

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Jonathan Michael Gander

This paper explores the spatial and material context of a creative production project. Taking the music recording project as an empirical setting, it explores the creation…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the spatial and material context of a creative production project. Taking the music recording project as an empirical setting, it explores the creation of a pop song and reveals the highly situated character of its management and organization. Making a creative product such as a pop song is a complex endeavor, requiring a large number of decisions involving highly subjective and often contested and contestable judgments. The purpose of this paper is to understand how this is achieved.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on observation of musicians and a music producer during the creation of a pop song in a mid-sized recording studio. Interviews were also conducted with the participant musicians and 24 music producers based in the UK. The resulting qualitative data were analyzed using a socio-material perspective to trace the spatial relationships and explore the material organization of the project.

Findings

Producing musical product is achieved through establishing spatial and material relations in order to regulate tasks and roles and manage the challenge of making decisions within temporarily assembled teams engaged in tasks characterized by high levels of uncertainty.

Originality/value

This paper tackles a neglected aspect of creative management, the physical context in which it is carried out. Other sites within the creative industries such as design and film studios, theatre and other performance spaces can usefully be analyzed using the approach and perspective of this research.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

Vincent Cho, Katrina Borowiec and Kaitlyn F. Tuthill

Applications for tracking and managing classroom behavior have become increasingly commonplace, thus making it possible to incorporate nonacademic data into collaborative…

Abstract

Purpose

Applications for tracking and managing classroom behavior have become increasingly commonplace, thus making it possible to incorporate nonacademic data into collaborative problem-solving and school improvement. Whether or how these platforms might support such aims, however, is not known. Accordingly, this study explores practices involving these applications, focusing especially on problem-solving among educators and with students' families.

Design/methodology/approach

This comparative case study took place in three schools. In total, 34 semistructured interviews were conducted with teachers and school leaders. Analysis included qualitative coding as well as the development of within- and cross-case summaries.

Findings

Schools varied greatly when it came to using behavior management platforms as a part of problem-solving. At a basic level, it was not uncommon for educators to use behavioral data for classroom troubleshooting or check-ins with students and transactional communications with families. However, only two schools attempted to use behavioral data for more systemic, “big picture” problem-solving, such as to make discipline policies more equitable or to improve teacher practices. The richness of collaboration with families seemed especially shaped by how and how frequently data were shared (e.g. automated notifications and paper printouts).

Originality/value

Empirical research about behavior management applications has been limited and focused only at the classroom level. The present study contributes new knowledge about the school-level implications of these platforms, while also expanding conversations about how behavioral data may be incorporated into data-informed problem-solving. Implications for leadership and theory are also discussed.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 59 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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