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1 – 10 of 325
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Paul A. Stokes

To establish the concept of identity as the bridging concept of cybernetics and sociology.

1206

Abstract

Purpose

To establish the concept of identity as the bridging concept of cybernetics and sociology.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is a pincers movement. On the one hand, it is argued that there has been a move towards an identity society; identity is a foundational concept for an understanding of contemporary society. On the other hand, the paper argues that in the work of Beer, identity became the key to his proposal that the VSM is the optimal form of variety management in a social system. The study is based on an extension and application of Finalizierungstheorie to the problem.

Findings

Identity is the key concept for the articulation of cybernetics and sociology. There has been a singular failure to apply cybernetic ideas to sociological materials in a manner that has met with the approval and satisfaction of the sociological community. Beer's formulation of the identity phenomenon and its extrapolation in the social sphere proposes a solution to this long‐standing problem.

Practical implications

The approach allows for a broad ranging multi‐level research programme in sociological cybernetics to be formulated and pursued in a manner congenial to the accumulation of a substantial knowledge base ranging from micro‐ to macro‐issues.

Originality/value

This paper presents a unique synthesis of cybernetics and sociology building on and extending the work of Beer in the field of managerial cybernetics.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

81

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Leonard Stokes

This study examines 117 verbs associated with 2,872 learning objectives, and 377 questions taken from 24 textbooks across the accounting curriculum. To determine the level…

Abstract

This study examines 117 verbs associated with 2,872 learning objectives, and 377 questions taken from 24 textbooks across the accounting curriculum. To determine the level of cognitive ability associated with the individual learning objectives I analyzed the verbs based upon Bloom's Taxonomy. To reach across the accounting curriculum I chose texts from Financial Accounting, Intermediate Financial Accounting, Advanced Financial Accounting, Managerial Accounting, Cost Accounting, and Auditing. Results of the analysis found that the authors used verbs at the lower learning levels of the cognitive domain. The verbs used by the author teams depend upon individual preference rather a specific segment of the cognitive domain. In addition, as the student progresses through the accounting curriculum some topics in upper level textbooks use learning objectives at the same level as in introductory level textbooks.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-519-2

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1907

“GIVE a dog a bad name and hang him,” is an aphorism which has been accepted for many years. But, like many other household words, it is not always true. Even if it were…

Abstract

“GIVE a dog a bad name and hang him,” is an aphorism which has been accepted for many years. But, like many other household words, it is not always true. Even if it were, the dog to be operated upon would probably prefer a gala day at his Tyburn Tree to being executed in an obscure back yard.

Details

New Library World, vol. 9 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-519-2

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1905

BOOKS and Libraries for the Blind form the subject of a paper by Dr. Robert C. Moon in the May Library Journal. The writer is the son of William Moon, the inventor of the…

Abstract

BOOKS and Libraries for the Blind form the subject of a paper by Dr. Robert C. Moon in the May Library Journal. The writer is the son of William Moon, the inventor of the system of embossed writing bearing his name. He describes the systems of writing for the blind in use, and the various agencies for circulating literature. After examining the existing departments for the blind in Public Libraries, he comes to the conclusion that “all the libraries need more books, and if they are to reach and teach the adult blind they must have a fair proportion of them in the Moon type. All Public Libraries should possess a few works printed in the various types, care being taken to have a good supply of those embossed in the special type which is taught in the schools for the blind of the immediate locality, in order that the pupils in vacation time, and the graduates of the schools may be provided with reading matter, but the infirm and aged blind will be found in almost all communities, and for them books printed in the Moon type are indispensable. Alice S. Tyler describes the League of Library Commissions. “The success of the experiment in co‐operation which was inaugurated in 1901 by the library commissions of Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa, whereby printed matter of common interest and equal necessity and value to these commissions was issued jointly, led to the suggestion that a national organization might more economically carry forward these and other lines of co‐operative work, leaving to the overcrowded state commission workers more time and money for the peculiar problems of each state.” This suggestion was brought up at the St. Louis conference, and resulted in an organization being formed under the title of the League of Library Commissions, consisting of one representative from each of the commissions included. The particular directions in which the League will promote co‐operative work are: carefully prepared lists of books for first purchase for small libraries; lists of new books which, upon examination, had been found desirable ; handbook of suggestions and direction as to the organization and management of small libraries; printed statement regarding the aims and methods of state library commissions, with comparison of their laws; definite help and suggestions on the subject of library buildings, especially floor‐plans arranged for economic administration, growing out of the experience of the library commissions in connection with the erection of Carnegie and other library buildings within the last few years; united effort to bring to the attention of book publishers the urgent need of good, durable binding, adequate indexing, &c.

Details

New Library World, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1901

In this number Mr. Thos. Johnston, the Chief Librarian of the Hornsey Public Libraries, contributes an article on the “infected” book question, following up Mr. Jast's…

Abstract

In this number Mr. Thos. Johnston, the Chief Librarian of the Hornsey Public Libraries, contributes an article on the “infected” book question, following up Mr. Jast's note in a previous issue, in the course of which he gives the result of information obtained from other libraries as to the practices followed. This is an excellent example to other librarians, which we hope they will carefully note and act upon. That is to say, when they next send round the usual circular letter (or it may be a postcard), with the usual batch of questions relating to Sunday opening, or salaries, or the caretaker's uniform, or requiring perhaps a full account of the library, “from the earliest period to the present day,” and receive the usual percentage of replies, do not let them pack away all this information in a box or drawer when their immediate purpose is accomplished, there to lie undisturbed till the next librarian comes along, and burns it with other of his predecessor's “rubbish.” This is a selfish policy. Let him send it to us for publication, and so make some sort of return for the expenditure of temper and time the replies have cost the busy men of the profession : the men with nothing to do seldom reply. Then the same questions would not continue to be asked. Having answered once the question, What are your hours of opening and closing in all departments? you would not be required to go on answering it several times a year. Should there be so benighted a member of the profession as not to see our magazine, and should he promulgate the query, a postcard with the simple words, “Buy The Library World—and read it,” will be sufficient. This will at once fulfil the threefold purpose of relieving you, helping your correspondent, and last, but not least, advertising us. Many librarians who might contribute to our columns do not do so, on the plea that they cannot think of anything to write about. Here then is a suggestion. Have they not, stowed away somewhere or other (but, of coarse, carefully indexed on cards), interesting and valuable material gathered in this way, which would require very little working up to be an acceptable contribution to the comparative study of library methods? It is this comparative study which must form the basis of any thoroughly sound and widely useful system of library economics

Details

New Library World, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1911

THE time is come when the Library Association and the Library Assistants' Association should combine to draw up a scale of reasonable salaries for properly qualified…

Abstract

THE time is come when the Library Association and the Library Assistants' Association should combine to draw up a scale of reasonable salaries for properly qualified service in libraries for use (a) in advising authorities seeking information upon the point, and (b) as a gauge if they should decide to make a united protest against the low remuneration which authorities sometimes disgrace themselves by offering to librarians.

Details

New Library World, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Ana Carvalho and Martinha Sampaio

The purpose of this paper is to complement and test prescriptive volunteer management proposals by examining how volunteers are actually managed and exploring factors…

1796

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to complement and test prescriptive volunteer management proposals by examining how volunteers are actually managed and exploring factors other than prescribed best practice to assess volunteer management effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use qualitative methods to study five Portuguese non-profit organisations, selected for having active volunteer programmes while presenting diverse sizes, organisation styles and levels of reliance upon volunteers. Interviews were conducted between February and August 2011 with board representatives, volunteer managers and volunteers.

Findings

This paper assesses volunteer management practices in these organisations, and further identifies a number of interrelated dimensions affecting volunteer programme success, namely: centrality, formalisation, professional support, sustainability and a minimum set of practices. It also uncovers weakness points that inhibit further development, including lack of a strategic approach and limited capacity to diversify sources of financing.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study, with a limited number of cases and interviews.

Practical implications

This study may help volunteer managers focus their attention in aspects other than prescribed management practice. Although a minimum set of identified practices are vital, the dimensions it uncovers have a pivotal role in the success of volunteer programmes.

Originality/value

This set of intertwined dimensions has not been specifically addressed in the literature. They go beyond the more conventionally prescribed volunteer management practices, and provide a promising framework for analysing the effectiveness and sustainability of volunteer management.

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

B.P. LEONARD and SIMIN MOKHTARI

In 1982, Smith and Hutton published comparative results of several different convection‐diffusion schemes applied to a specially devised test problem involving…

Abstract

In 1982, Smith and Hutton published comparative results of several different convection‐diffusion schemes applied to a specially devised test problem involving near‐discontinuities and strong streamline curvature. First‐order methods showed significant artificial diffusion, whereas higher‐order methods gave less smearing but had a tendency to overshoot and oscillate. Perhaps because unphysical oscillations are more obvious than unphysical smearing, the intervening period has seen a rise in popularity of low‐order artificially diffusive schemes, especially in the numerical heat‐transfer industry. This paper presents an alternative strategy of using non‐artificially diffusive higher‐order methods, while maintaining strictly monotonic transitions through the use of simple flux‐limiter constraints. Limited third‐order upwinding is usually found to be the most cost‐effective basic convection scheme. Tighter resolution of discontinuities can be obtained at little additional cost by using automatic adaptive stencil expansion to higher order in local regions, as needed.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

1 – 10 of 325