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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2019

Claudia Achtenhagen and Leona Achtenhagen

Currently, the hype surrounding digitalization proclaims that the way in which companies create and capture value will change dramatically. Companies that adjust their…

Abstract

Purpose

Currently, the hype surrounding digitalization proclaims that the way in which companies create and capture value will change dramatically. Companies that adjust their business models to embrace digital technologies will need different skill sets and competences. Current research tends to focus on the impact of digital technologies on corporations or more generally the labor market, but the authors lack detailed insights into how companies perceive this development to influence their needs regarding employee qualifications. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore how companies perceive the impact of digital technologies on the education and training needs of current and future employees.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws on eight case studies from the food industry. It focuses on one occupation certified within the German “dual system” of vocational education and training (VET), the machine and plant operator with focus on food technology.

Findings

The findings suggest that the impact of different digital technologies on employees’ job positions, working tasks and training needs is carefully considered in decisions regarding the implementation of digital technologies. Despite some company-specific contingencies, the perceived implications for VET needs are largely similar across the sample.

Originality/value

This study draws attention to the importance of reviewing VET needs in relation to the decision of implementing digital technologies.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Leona Achtenhagen and Malin Tillmar

The purpose of this paper is to direct attention to recent research on women's entrepreneurship, focusing on Nordic countries.

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1145

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to direct attention to recent research on women's entrepreneurship, focusing on Nordic countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper encourages research that investigates how context, at the micro, meso and macro level, is related to women's entrepreneurship, and acknowledges that gender is socially constructed.

Findings

This paper finds evidence that recent calls for new directions in women's entrepreneurship research are being followed, specifically with regard to how gender is done and how context is related to women's entrepreneurial activities.

Originality/value

This paper assesses trends in research on women's entrepreneurship, mainly from the Nordic countries.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Leona Achtenhagen and Dodo zu Knyphausen‐Aufsess

To date, entrepreneurship education mainly targets pupils of different age groups as well as undergraduate and graduate students. Despite a growing interest in…

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999

Abstract

Purpose

To date, entrepreneurship education mainly targets pupils of different age groups as well as undergraduate and graduate students. Despite a growing interest in entrepreneurship there are few doctoral programs solely dedicated to it. Doctoral education is a crucial element to develop qualified scholars in the field, especially in countries without a strong tradition in entrepreneurship education. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present and discuss a doctoral program in high‐tech entrepreneurship in Germany as a good‐practice case for establishing such programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a single‐case study. Both authors were involved in the program in different roles. One played a leading part in designing and running it, the other was recruited into it. Empirically, the case is based on program documentation, personal accounts, as well as communication with other people involved in the program.

Findings

Success factors for establishing a postgraduate entrepreneurship education program include cooperation between different academic institutions, entrepreneurial and established companies, as well as government agencies.

Research limitations/implications

This paper draws heavily on the authors' personal experiences and reflections. Thus, a potential point of criticism is possible bias. Yet, the personal involvement provides unique insights which would otherwise have been difficult to obtain.

Practical implications

Some success factors as well as challenges in setting up and running similar programs are provided.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in a detailed account of the case of putting in place a unique high‐technology postgraduate entrepreneurship program. The paper broadens the focus of the entrepreneurship education literature.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Sylvain Max and Valérie Ballereau

The purpose of this paper is to approach women's entrepreneurship from a social psychological perspective, with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the…

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1449

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to approach women's entrepreneurship from a social psychological perspective, with the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomena and to its development as a field of research.

Design/methodology/approach

The gender aspect of entrepreneurship is essentially socio‐psychological in nature. First, the authors define the social psychology research scope and present a selection of social psychology theories that are particularly relevant to the domain of women's entrepreneurship. Concepts such as stereotypes, stereotype threat and role models are introduced. Second, the authors instantiate how the social psychology experimental method can address core questions in the women's entrepreneurship field, such as women's under‐representation in entrepreneurial positions.

Findings

The conclusion of this paper is twofold: on the one hand, social psychology theories can address crucial issues in women's entrepreneurship and on the other hand, experimentation as a research methodology enables us to determine causal relationships. However, given the specificities of both social psychology and women's entrepreneurship, we strongly recommend collaborative research between researchers in the two areas.

Research limitations/implications

The authors propose concrete though non‐exhaustive areas of study in women's entrepreneurship research, where social psychological theories can be successfully employed.

Social implications

Using applied social psychology research, the authors suggest practical ways to reject negative stereotypes that prevent women from being entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

Although women's entrepreneurship is a social psychological phenomenon, this field of study still rarely makes reference to social psychology as a discipline for theorizing the relationship between gender and entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Leona Achtenhagen

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143

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Susan Clark Muntean

While numerous comparative studies have measured women's participation in starting or owning a business, the factors stimulating their engagement in highly productive…

Abstract

Purpose

While numerous comparative studies have measured women's participation in starting or owning a business, the factors stimulating their engagement in highly productive entrepreneurial activity have been understudied. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study compares country‐level data on the institutional and cultural factors that affect a woman's decision to start and grow a business with country‐level measures of the entrepreneurial environment, innovative activity and access to opportunity.

Findings

It was found that three institutional and cultural factors influence the decision calculus of women to found and expand enterprises: legal and social status; institutional presence; and economic empowerment. Women who have the requisite support exploit market opportunities and translate their ideas, creativity and skills into high potential, high growth ventures. This in turn generates entrepreneurial activity, job creation and prosperity at the country level.

Research limitations/implications

Comparable data on variables of interest, including the number of female‐founded high‐growth businesses and child care support, for example, are not available across countries. This study uses proxies and indices where data are missing and makes recommendations on improving data collection for future scholarship.

Practical implications

Improving access to collateral by strengthening the property rights of women, increasing the representation of women in banking, business, government and academia, and providing greater economic empowerment of all women produces more productive entrepreneurial activity and prosperity for the entire population.

Originality/value

Women entrepreneurs are a missing link that explains variation among countries in the quality and quantity of entrepreneurial activity.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Anne Kovalainen and Johanna Österberg‐Högstedt

This article aims to look first at how entrepreneurial identity fits into the picture we currently have of social and health care professionals who most often work in paid…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to look first at how entrepreneurial identity fits into the picture we currently have of social and health care professionals who most often work in paid employment in the public sector, and second, how entrepreneurial identity is constructed. We discuss whether professional identity and entrepreneurial identity can be separated, and how meaningful that question is. Is the role of entrepreneurship limited in the context of health and social care professional services, or can we see the emergence of a new kind of entrepreneurial identity with special features related to the complexity within the provision of services in social and health care?

Design/methodology/approach

The materials from two previous studies by the authors are used in the article as empirical data to investigate the questions of identity and professionalism. The methodology is based on re‐reading and re‐interpretation of both empirical studies and theoretical literature.

Findings

There are differences and different logics of work‐related identity building among the entrepreneurial groups and among professional groups. Despite this and even if part of the research tradition emphasizes this difference and the separateness of these identities, we argue that identities are fluid, changing, layered and overlapping. As identities cannot be predetermined or classified according to economic earnings logic only, but that they are malleable, evolving, interconnected, and intertwined. In addition, the paper raises the contradiction of stereotypically “masculine” entrepreneurial goals and the stereotypically “female” ideology of care existing as tension within entrepreneurship in social and health care.

Research limitations/implications

The research limitations relate to the research design of not using ethnographical data.

Practical implications

The article has no direct practical implications. The results might have relevance to education.

Social implications

The article has social implications in the ways the identities are discussed through various discourses in the societies.

Originality/value

The article has both originality in the settings and value in bringing different discussions together, as well as in its ability to widen the theoretical discussions and empirical studies on identities, paid employment and entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Åsa Lindholm Dahlstrand and Diamanto Politis

Despite a growing interest in both women and university academic entrepreneurship, there are very few studies addressing women's academic entrepreneurship. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite a growing interest in both women and university academic entrepreneurship, there are very few studies addressing women's academic entrepreneurship. The authors address this gap by focusing on university incubators for women's academic entrepreneurship. The purpose of this paper is to examine and analyze the significance of university incubators for the promotion and development of women's academic business start‐ups.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a unique Swedish database for multivariate statistical tests on the performance of groups of women‐ and men‐led ventures, as well as on groups of women incubatees. The database includes data for over 1,400 ventures, out of which 210 ventures are by women entrepreneurs.

Findings

About 15 percent of the ventures in the incubators are started and managed by women entrepreneurs. Several significant differences were found between the groups, but the overall conclusion is that the Swedish incubators in this study do not show any evidence of being able to decrease the gender gap in the commercialization of university science.

Originality/value

The study makes three important contributions. First, it applies a multilevel design that takes into consideration the relationship between individual firms and the incubator environment. Second, the authors conducted their analysis on women academic entrepreneurs who start their ventures in incubators, which means that the authors are concerned with a specific knowledge‐intensive context, where men and women entrepreneurs possess fairly similar levels of human capital. Third, the unique database allows statistical analysis on a large data set, which provides research‐based knowledge about the conditions for entrepreneurial career development among women in academic environments.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Maria Bogren, Yvonne von Friedrichs, Øystein Rennemo and Øystein Widding

The purpose of this paper is to explore the kinds of contacts and networks women find supportive in their role as business leaders, and which also support their…

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1998

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the kinds of contacts and networks women find supportive in their role as business leaders, and which also support their willingness to grow their business. The approach is to investigate the context of women entrepreneurs and the kinds of supporting social networks of which they are part. This is seen in relation to their willingness to grow.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were sent to women entrepreneurs in mid‐Sweden and mid‐Norway, relating to supportive assets and willingness for growth.

Findings

The results show: that personal networks are seen as a more supportive asset than business networks; that personal contacts with other entrepreneurs are regarded as valuable; and that women entrepreneurs who are positive towards new networks already have a more heterogenic network than those who do not express this willingness.

Practical implications

Without a relational attitude and a willingness to put oneself into a relational interplay, women entrepreneurs will have a hard time succeeding in growing their businesses.

Originality/value

This study is unique in three ways: first, it combines different theoretical perspectives, above all a variety of network perspectives seen in an entrepreneurial context. Second, from a huge set of data containing women entrepreneurs, the paper presents valid findings about social network configurations among this group. Third, it introduces the term “willingness”, and discusses the effects related to this and to network expansion and business growth. These dimensions help us to increase the understanding of networking and growth in women‐owned enterprises.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Craig S. Galbraith

Downloads
871

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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