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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Anastasia Constantelou and Leo Van Audenhove

413

Abstract

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info, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Trisha Meyer and Leo Van Audenhove

This paper seeks to offer an alternative critique to graduated response, a warning and sanction mechanism aimed at fighting online piracy.

769

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to offer an alternative critique to graduated response, a warning and sanction mechanism aimed at fighting online piracy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reflects on and frames graduated response in terms of theories on surveillance society and code. In particular, it analyses the graduated response debate in the European Union and the current initiatives in France and the UK.

Findings

The paper argues that graduated response portrays rights holders as being in a state of emergency, is a form of social sorting, and has a technological bias.

Originality/value

This paper contends that many objections raised to graduated response have been reduced to issues concerning the procedure rather than the principle, and that important societal questions concerning graduated response remain un(der)explored.

Details

info, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Content available
633

Abstract

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Leo Van Audenhove, Karen Donders and Anastasia Constantelou

821

Abstract

Details

info, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Leo Van Audenhove

304

Abstract

Details

info, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Heritiana Ranaivoson and Anne‐Catherine Lorrain

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the HADOPI Law adopted in France in 2009. It aims to focus on two aspects of the law: the graduated response and the certification

483

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the HADOPI Law adopted in France in 2009. It aims to focus on two aspects of the law: the graduated response and the certification of a “legal” offer. It also aims to describe both, analyze their rationale and discuss their likely impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper combines legal and economic approaches. The legal debates have been analyzed and transcribed in a casual discourse. Economic analysis is used to understand the rationale of the law. Both approaches are used to point out the limitations of the law.

Findings

The paper shows that the graduated response and the certification of a “legal” offer both target consumers. The former aims at deterring file sharing, the latter aims at guiding consumers towards “legal” services. However, the graduated response's efficiency is dubious; the certification raises the issue of defining what is legal. Both mechanisms destabilize the French copyright law by putting more pressure on ISPs and online services. Targeting consumers in the name of copyright may cause a rejection of copyright as a whole.

Practical implications

The HADOPI Law is considered a pioneer in the field of copyright enforcement, especially as a first application of the graduated response. The topic is therefore of premier importance for copyright at global level.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to combine economic and legal approaches to analyze the graduated response. It deals with the certification of “legal” services, which has only rarely been studied. The link between both mechanisms has never been considered before.

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Marc van Lieshout, Linda Kool, Bas van Schoonhoven and Marjan de Jonge

The purpose of this paper is to develop/elaborate the concept Privacy by Design (PbD) and to explore the validity of the PbD framework.

1909

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop/elaborate the concept Privacy by Design (PbD) and to explore the validity of the PbD framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Attention for alternative concepts, such as PbD, which might offer surplus value in safeguarding privacy, is growing. Using PbD to design for privacy in ICT systems is still rather underexplored and requires substantial conceptual and empirical work to be done. The methodology includes conceptual analysis, empirical validation (focus groups and interviews) and technological testing (a technical demonstrator was build).

Findings

A holistic PbD approach can offer surplus value in better safeguarding of privacy without losing functional requirements. However, the implementation is not easily realised and confronted with several difficulties such as: potential lack of economic incentives, legacy systems, lack of adoption of trust of end‐users and consumers in PbD.

Originality/value

The article brings together/incorporates several contemporary insights on privacy protection and privacy by design and develops/presents a holistic framework for Privacy by Design framework consisting of five building blocks.

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Pieter Nooren, Andra Leurdijk and Nico van Eijk

Video distribution over the internet leads to heated net‐neutrality related debates between network operators and over‐the‐top application providers. The purpose of this

1537

Abstract

Purpose

Video distribution over the internet leads to heated net‐neutrality related debates between network operators and over‐the‐top application providers. The purpose of this paper is to analyze this debate from a new perspective that takes into account all of the assets that companies try to exploit in the so‐called battle for eyeballs in video distribution.

Design/methodology/approach

The systematic value chain analysis is used to determine the points along the value chain where net neutrality interacts with video distribution. The inputs to the analysis are the existing and proposed policy measures for net neutrality in Europe and in the USA, and a number of net neutrality incidents that have led to discussions earlier.

Findings

The paper finds that the current and proposed policy measures aimed at net neutrality each contribute to a certain extent to their intended effects. However, the analysis also shows that they are likely to lead to new debates in other parts of the value chain, as players try to compensate the loss of influence or revenue streams by rearranging the ways in which they exploit their assets.

Practical implications

Further and new debates are expected in the areas of peering and interconnection, distribution of resources between over‐the‐top and managed services and the role of devices with tightly linked search engines, recommendation systems and app stores.

Originality/value

The new perspectives offered by our value‐chain based analysis are valuable for policy makers who aim to promote net neutrality and simultaneously stimulate competition and innovation throughout the value chain.

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Jo Pierson and Rob Heyman

The advent of Web 2.0 or so‐called social media have enabled a new kind of communication, called mass self‐communication. These tools and the new form of communication are

10866

Abstract

Purpose

The advent of Web 2.0 or so‐called social media have enabled a new kind of communication, called mass self‐communication. These tools and the new form of communication are believed to empower users in everyday life. The authors of this paper observe a paradox: if this positive potential is possible, the negative downside is also possible. There is often a denial of this downside and it is especially visible in social media at the level of privacy and dataveillance. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate this point through an analysis of cookies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper illustrates how mass self‐communication in social media enables a new form of vulnerability for privacy. This is best shown by redefining privacy as flows of Personal Identifiable Information (PII) that are regulated by informational norms of Nissenbaum's concept of contextual integrity. Instead of analysing these contexts on a general level, the paper operationalises them on the user level to illustrate the lack of user awareness regarding cookies. The results of the research were gathered through desk research and expert interviews.

Findings

The positive aspects of cookies, unobtrusiveness and ease of use, are also the main challenges for user privacy. This technology can be disempowering because users are often hardly aware of its existence. In that way cookies can obfuscate the perceived context of personal data exposure.

Originality/value

The research shows how user disempowerment in social media is often overlooked by overstressing their beneficial potential.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Martijn Poel, Linda Kool and Annelieke van der Giessen

ICT is everywhere, but information society policy cannot address all the sectors and policy issues in which ICT plays a role. This paper's aim is to develop an analytical

Abstract

Purpose

ICT is everywhere, but information society policy cannot address all the sectors and policy issues in which ICT plays a role. This paper's aim is to develop an analytical framework to assist policy makers in deciding on the priorities and coordination of information society policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The analytical framework is based on public management literature and innovation literature. The framework can be applied to individual ICT issues – when to lead, advise, explore or refrain from policy intervention. The framework consists of seven questions, including the rationale for intervention, stakeholders, the mandate of fellow policy makers (e.g. other ministries) and the costs, benefits and risks of intervention. The framework was applied in three cases.

Findings

A leading role for information society policy is most clear for e‐skills. For services innovation, several market failures and system failures appear to be relevant. This calls for a mix of policy instruments, with roles for several ministries. Policy coordination is crucial. For ICT in health sectors – and other public sectors – the conclusion is that information society policy can take the lead on cross‐cutting ICT issues such as privacy, standardisation and interoperability.

Originality/value

The article addresses one of the main challenges of information society policy: how to increase its scope, yet maintain effectiveness and coherence.

Details

info, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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