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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Leo K. Jago and Jean‐Pierre Issaverdis

Ensuring an excellent visitor experience and meeting customer expectations is a key goal for most tourism businesses and of primary concern to government industry…

Abstract

Ensuring an excellent visitor experience and meeting customer expectations is a key goal for most tourism businesses and of primary concern to government industry organisations. The Better Business Tourism Accreditation Program, underpinning a broad tourism accreditation initiative, has been implemented in Victoria across a range of tourism sectors. The program provides business management and operational guidelines for tourism businesses. Winery tourism, the process of visiting a Winery and the associated cellar door experience, is now acknowledged as an important part of regional tourism in Victoria. To assist in establishing benchmarks for cellar door operations the Victorian Wineries Tourism Council, in consultation with the industry, has developed Cellar Door sector guidelines. The program assists winery operators to identify and document cellar door operational procedures that contribute to the visitor experience. This article discusses the development of the Better Business Tourism Accreditation Program and Cellar Door sector guidelines, and feedback gained from a series of industry workshops. These workshops addressed concerns raised by participants and provided them with support in completing the accreditation program. A self‐complete questionnaire was administered at the workshops that sought to identify participant views on cellar door activity, the importance of tourism and accreditation. The results suggest that accreditation can provide a useful means of identifying and implementing business and operational practices that will improve the cellar door experience for visitors.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Peter Schofield, Phil Crowther, Leo Jago, John Heeley and Scott Taylor

This paper aims to contribute to theory concerning collaborative innovation through stakeholder engagement with reference to Glasgow City Marketing Bureau’s (GCMB’s…

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1106

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to theory concerning collaborative innovation through stakeholder engagement with reference to Glasgow City Marketing Bureau’s (GCMB’s) management strategies, which represent UK best practice in events procurement, leveraging and destination branding.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a case study design to facilitate an in-depth evaluation of the destination marketing organisation’s (DMO’s) critical success factors. Multiple perspectives on GCMB’s collaborative innovation are achieved through semi-structured interviews with senior managers from the bureau, key stakeholders and other DMOs.

Findings

GCMB’s success results from long-term, extensive, collaborative engagement, a unique institutional structure and sustained political and financial support through to transformational leadership, strategic event selection and targeted marketing through “earned” distribution channels.

Research limitations/implications

The study takes a single case study approach and focusses on GCMB’s event-led branding strategy. Given the importance but relative neglect of long-term inter-personal relationships in collaborative innovation, future research should focus on the development of social capital and adopt a longitudinal perspective.

Practical implications

The paper provides insights into the collaborative innovation process with a range of stakeholders, which underpins GCMB’s events strategy and its leveraging of the city brand. In particular, the study highlights the need for entrepreneurial leadership and the development of long-term relationships for effective engagement with stakeholders.

Originality/value

Previous research has focussed on outcomes and neglected pre-requisites and the process of collaborative innovation between destination stakeholders. This study examines this issue from the perspective of a successful DMO and presents a conceptual framework and new engagement dimensions that address this gap in knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Abstract

Details

Delivering Tourism Intelligence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-810-9

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2013

Abstract

Details

Tourism Social Media: Transformations in Identity, Community and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-213-4

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2010

Margaret Deery and Leo Jago

The research focusing on the social impacts of events on communities has reached a level of critical mass and this paper aims to synthesise the literature, including the…

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16761

Abstract

Purpose

The research focusing on the social impacts of events on communities has reached a level of critical mass and this paper aims to synthesise the literature, including the research methods used and analytical techniques that have been employed in order to provide a platform for future research in this important area.

Design/methodology/approach

The key method used is a literature review of all the available academic research into the social impacts of events on communities and the development of a model for future research.

Findings

After reviewing the social impact literature, the paper finds that one negative social impact, in particular, has the potential to undermine the key positive impacts that events can deliver for a host community. This impact, which is collectively known as anti‐social behaviour (ASB) incorporates behaviour such as drunken, rowdy and potentially life and property threatening behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The consequences of the impact of ASB are so serious, partly because it is an impact which the media often highlight, can seriously tarnish the image of an event in the eyes of the local community and reduce their pride in the destination. Community tourism leaders need to manage this impact in order to maintain resident support. The paper concludes with a model for future research into the social impacts of events on communities, focusing on the role that ASB plays in residents' perceptions of events.

Originality/value

This paper provides a review of the literature on social impacts to date and is a resource for researchers in the area. In addition, the paper highlights the role that ASB plays in aggravating negative perceptions of tourism in communities and the need for a more in‐depth understanding of ASB.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Leo Jago and Margaret Deery

This paper examines the role of human resource practices in enabling cost reduction and quality enhancement. In particular, it investigates the use of volunteers in…

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5519

Abstract

This paper examines the role of human resource practices in enabling cost reduction and quality enhancement. In particular, it investigates the use of volunteers in tourism organisations. The study is located in two visitor information centres (VICs) and focuses on the financial costs and service quality of paid staff and volunteers. The research uses both qualitative and quantitative data. The findings suggest that volunteers provide a cost effective means of providing quality service and that there were, in this instance, no differences found in the quality of service provided by paid staff and volunteers. The findings also suggest that human resource practices such as innovative training programs, strategic recruiting and the provision of a team environment enhance the service quality. Future research directions are recommended as an outcome of this study.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Margaret Deery and Leo Jago

This paper aims to examine the themes of talent management, work-life balance (WLB) and retention strategies in the hospitality industry. The study was undertaken through…

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41354

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the themes of talent management, work-life balance (WLB) and retention strategies in the hospitality industry. The study was undertaken through an analysis of the key themes in the most recent literature. The paper uses a framework incorporating organisational and industry attributes, personal employee dimensions, work-life conflict and organisational strategies and examines these in relation to whether job satisfaction, organisational commitment and employee retention improve.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses employee turnover literature to underpin a discussion of successful talent management. Using a key word search in both the hospitality literature and more mainstream management research, it divides the literature into four themes, namely, employee attitudes, personal employee dimensions, WLB and organisational strategies for employee retention.

Findings

The key findings emerging from this examination of the literature show that WLB appears to have become one of the key variables when addressing issues of employee management and retention. In the recent literature, the link between employee attitudes, such as job satisfaction and organisational commitment, personal dimensions, such as stress and alcohol abuse, and WLB have become closer and intertwined. These links assist in gaining more focussed strategies to assist in retaining talented staff.

Research limitations/implications

The meta-analysis of relevant literature provides an understanding of recent thinking in the area of WLB, talent management and the retention of talented staff. The article reframes the key issues in light of changes in the work environment and presents a new framework for future research and industry application.

Practical implications

Given that WLB has become such an important factor, it is critical that managers regularly monitor the levels of WLB being experienced by staff. As staff are not always aware of WLB being a problem until it is too late, managers will need to find appropriate methods for assessing the presence of problems in this area.

Social implications

The development of WLB strategies within the hospitality industry will assist in providing a healthier lifestyle for employees. This will then positively impact on family and social relationships.

Originality/value

The meta-analysis of relevant literature provides an understanding of recent thinking in the area of WLB, talent management and the retention of talented staff. The article reframes the key issues in light of changes in the work environment and presents a new framework for future research and industry application.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2010

Leo Jago, Larry Dwyer, Geoffrey Lipman, Daneel van Lill and Shaun Vorster

The purpose of this paper is to examine the reasons that mega‐events rarely realise their potential for host destinations and to suggest issues that need to be addressed…

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9247

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the reasons that mega‐events rarely realise their potential for host destinations and to suggest issues that need to be addressed in rectifying this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a synthesis of the literature as well as the substantial event‐related experience of the authors.

Findings

The key reason that mega‐events do not generate the expected benefits for the host destination is that event organisers and destination managers adopt a short‐term perspective rather than seeing mega‐events as part of a long‐term strategy for the destination. Even the planned legacies are often not realised as resource constraints in the lead up to the staging of the event often results in resources being shifted away from planning for legacies and being allocated to helping cover the more immediate needs of the event.

Research limitations/implications

If the mega‐event knowledge portal that is proposed in this paper to help improve the overall contribution that mega‐events make to host destinations is developed, it will prove to be a fertile source of data for longitudinal research in the field of mega‐events.

Originality/value

As so many mega‐events fail to deliver the expected benefits for the host destination, this paper provides some useful insights into the key issues that need to be addressed in order to help overcome this problem.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Fevzi Okumus

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232

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Carles Mulet-Forteza, Juanabel Genovart-Balaguer, José Maria Merigó and Emilio Mauleon-Mendez

The International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management is a leading international journal in the field of hospitality and tourism management. It was started in…

Abstract

Purpose

The International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management is a leading international journal in the field of hospitality and tourism management. It was started in 1989, and it turns 30 years old this year. To celebrate this anniversary, this paper presents a bibliometric overview of the publication and citation structure of the journal over the past 30 years. The purpose of this paper is to identify the relevant issues in terms of keywords and topics and who is achieving better results in terms of authors, universities and countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The Scopus database is used to collect the bibliographical material. A graphical mapping of the bibliographic data is developed by using VOSviewer software. It produces graphical maps with several bibliometric techniques, including co-citation, bibliographic coupling and co-occurrence of keywords.

Findings

The results indicate that English-speaking countries are producing the highest number of articles in the journal, followed by Asian institutions, with the Hong Kong Polytechnic University as the most productive institution.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there are no papers that present a general overview of the publication and citation structure of this journal. Its 30th anniversary is a good moment to develop this study.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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