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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Lena Croft and Shige Makino

Conventional theories of market entry assume choice availability. This investment assumption is subject to challenges in the power generation market of an emerging economy…

Abstract

Conventional theories of market entry assume choice availability. This investment assumption is subject to challenges in the power generation market of an emerging economy where the host government controls most key resources and market entry choices. With such constraints, entrants become heavily dependent on their host country partners. This study investigates how the resource dependency frameworks explain better in respect of some US power generation firms that manage to operate electricity facilities in China whereas some have to abort. Using cross‐case analysis, patterns emerged illustrate how two groups of entrants manage key resources differently.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Janet L. Sims‐Wood

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the…

Abstract

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the Afro‐American experience and to show the joys, sorrows, needs, and ideals of the Afro‐American woman as she struggles from day to day.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Ariel Sanders, Barbara J. Phillips and David E. Williams

The relationship between musicians and the music industry has often been depicted as a dichotomy between creativity and commerce with musicians conflicted between their…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between musicians and the music industry has often been depicted as a dichotomy between creativity and commerce with musicians conflicted between their roles as artists and their roles as marketers of sound. Recently, marketing researchers have problematized this dichotomy and suggested musicians perceive these roles as inevitable and indivisible. However, the processes of how musicians market their sound to the industry gatekeepers remain unclear. This study seeks to find the key industry gatekeepers for musicians and how musicians sell their personal sound to them.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an interpretative phenomenological approach, ten interviews with professional musicians across different music genres provided insight into the strategies musicians use to market their sound to industry gatekeepers.

Findings

In total, three key gatekeepers and the five strategies that musicians use to sell their sound are identified. The gatekeepers are record labels, other musicians and consumers. Musicians sell their sound to these gatekeepers through the externally directed strategies of using social media to build relationships, defining their personal sound through genre and creating a unique sound, and through the internally directed strategies of keeping motivated through sound evolution and counting on luck.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited by the small number of musicians interviewed and the heterogeneous representation of music genres.

Originality/value

The study contributes to theoretical understandings of how musicians as cultural producers market their sound in a commercial industry.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Heather Skinner

The purpose of this paper is to explore aural representation of the countryside and English rurality through the contemporary cultural product of folk song.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore aural representation of the countryside and English rurality through the contemporary cultural product of folk song.

Design/methodology/approach

A textual analysis was undertaken of the sleeve notes and lyrics of Steve Knightley, songwriter and founder member of the folk/roots band Show of Hands.

Findings

The concept of the rural idyll is thoroughly debunked in the majority of these lyrics. Many songs make specific reference to place, and these, in the main, focus on the historical and contemporary hardships of living in rural England, in many cases also making explicit reference to the historical or contemporary social issues deemed by the lyricist to be at the root of the problems faced by people living in English rural communities.

Research limitations/implications

This paper analyses data obtained in lyrics of only one songwriter within only one music genre, but the artist is one of the most respected within the contemporary folk genre, and Show of Hands have won a number of prestigious nationally recognised folk awards.

Originality/value

The extant literature contains little concerning aural representations of place identities through song. The contribution this paper makes is therefore in presenting a conceptual framework that shows how folk song, as a contemporary cultural product contributes to the construction and communication of rural place identities.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

Pierre A. Balthazard and Robert W. Thatcher

Through a review of historically famous cases and a chronicle of neurotechnology development, this chapter discusses brain structure and brain function as two distinct yet…

Abstract

Through a review of historically famous cases and a chronicle of neurotechnology development, this chapter discusses brain structure and brain function as two distinct yet interrelated paths to understand the relative contributions of anatomical and physiological mechanisms to the human brain–behavior relationship. From an organizational neuroscience perspective, the chapter describes over a dozen neuroimaging technologies that are classified under four groupings: morphologic, invasive metabolic, noninvasive metabolic, and electromagnetic. We then discuss neuroimaging variables that may be useful in social science investigations, and we underscore electroencephalography as a particularly useful modality for the study of individuals and groups in organizational settings. The chapter concludes by considering emerging science and novel brain technologies for the organizational researcher as we look to the future.

Details

Organizational Neuroscience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-430-0

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Book part
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Mike Finn

Abstract

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British Universities in the Brexit Moment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-742-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1968

To explain education in London is at the the same time to outline the history and development of much of the nation's educational progress since the 1870 Education Act. It…

Abstract

To explain education in London is at the the same time to outline the history and development of much of the nation's educational progress since the 1870 Education Act. It is also to attempt to grasp an administrative phenomenon that encompasses a population of over three million people yet retains a very real identity first through the old LCC, and now through the ILEA.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1979

Clive Bingley, Edwin Fleming and Allan Bunch

I WAS perturbed by a ‘kite’ flown in a national newspaper recently that in its search for economies in public expenditure, the new Conservative government might wield its…

Abstract

I WAS perturbed by a ‘kite’ flown in a national newspaper recently that in its search for economies in public expenditure, the new Conservative government might wield its axe on the British Library's proposed erection in the Euston Road. The current cost of the new building is informally judged to have climbed to a total of £300m, but as this expenditure is to be deployed over a decade and more, abandonment is hardly likely to make serious inroads into government expenditure curently running at more than £50,000m annually.

Details

New Library World, vol. 80 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1943

It is only fair to say that this work is backed by a larger basis of research than exists in most countries. For nearly twenty years, that is since the formation of the…

Abstract

It is only fair to say that this work is backed by a larger basis of research than exists in most countries. For nearly twenty years, that is since the formation of the “Dehydration Committee” by the Department of Agriculture in 1923, experiments have been carried on to determine the best methods of dehydrating Canadian apples, and the experience gained is now being applied to the dehydration of vegetables. One point which has been emphasised consistently throughout the work of the Committee is that high quality and fine flavour are essential for fruit or vegetables to be processed. During the past winter the Canadian Government was informed that the British Government was interested in dehydrated vegetables to an amount of approximately 1,000 tons. While the Canadian industry was not equipped to handle on short notice such a large order, immediate steps were taken in the establishment of test plants and the speeding up of experimentation. At that time representatives from the United Kingdom pointed out that no commercial samples of dehydrated vegetables from any country had been considered entirely satisfactory from the point of view of nutrition. The Canadian tests indicate that dehydrated vegetables can be of fine flavour and retain from 50 to 75 per cent. of the original vitamin content. Five experimental dehydration plants have been operating for some months, processing potatoes, carrots, turnips and cabbages from the 1941 crop. These are being held as a reserve supply for the Canadian Army. On the basis of these results, Canada should be able to supply large quantities of high‐quality dehydrated vegetables. The actual methods of dehydration employed vary according to the product. The simplest is that applied to the drying of fruits. Many of these, such as dates, figs, raisins, are dried in the whole state; others, apricots for example, are halved and pitted, while apples should be peeled, cored and sliced. Cut fruits, such as apricots and apples, are treated with sulphur dioxide, which acts as a steriliser and prevents discolourisation. Such fruits must be cooked before using in order to drive off the sulphur, but other dried fruits can be used without soaking or cooking. The moisture is removed by natural drying in the sun or by artificial evaporation. Many of the dehydration processes lie in the realm of chemical technology, but a short sketch of the principles involved may be of interest. The dehydration process used in the case of vegetables involves careful cleaning and cutting into small pieces, shreds or flakes. These are then “blanched” in steam or boiling water and placed in the dryer. While the amount of moisture which should be left varies with the particular vegetable, it should never exceed 7 per cent., and best results indicate a moisture content of 3 to 5 per cent. Substantial progress has already been made in research into the pre‐treatment of the vegetables. Cabbages, for example, should be “blanched” in steam, potatoes in plain water, and carrots in salt water. Investigation is continuing, however, into the actual drying of the vegetables and particularly as to the proper stage of maturity at which dehydration should take place. So far, it appears that no vegetables which are woody or fibrous have produced satisfactory results. Soft fruits, such as raspberries or strawberries, are reduced to a pulp, after the preliminary cleaning and “blanching.” This pulp is forced out over a heated drum, and when drying is completed looks something like “coloured crepe paper.” This filmy layer is broken into small fragments for packing and storage. It is reported that the original flavour and colour of the fruit is well maintained. The handling of milk and eggs, which are very liquid in their original form, requires a different process. After testing and preliminary sterilisation, the liquid is sprayed into a drying chamber where hot air in constant motion reduces it to a powder which falls to the floor. Although dehydrated foods can be kept under conditions of ordinary storage, they do require special care in packing. Metal containers are unnecessary, but the cartons must be impervious to moisture, to changes in temperature and to the attacks of insects and rodents. Canadian experience also indicates that removal of the oxygen in the container and its replacement by an inert gas, such as hydrogen, prevents any recurrence of chemical change and retains flavour for a considerably longer period. The acceptance of any product in war‐time, even for civilian consumption is, of course, no proof of its continued acceptance under normal conditions. Shortages of supply and the exigencies of the situation necessitate strange substitutions. Sometimes these are found better than the original product, and in the post‐war period tend to replace it. But this only occurs when the new substance or material has intrinsic advantages and can compete on a basis of quality. Many of us can remember the reaction in Great Britain against Canadian bacon after the last war, resulting from war‐time shipments of a type and quality to which the British were not accustomed. Long years of effort were necessary to break down the prejudice against Canadian bacon which was built up at that time. In the present war Canadian bacon is being prepared to suit the British palate. Since dehydrated foods have not yet come into general war‐time use it is impossible to prophesy regarding post‐war markets, but there are a number of interesting sidelights on the situation. One of the industries hardest hit by the tin shortage has been the manufacture of dog food, which had been growing rapidly in the pre‐war years. These manufacturers have been the first to produce dehydrated products to be sold to the general public, truly a case of “trying it out on the dog.” While we do not attempt to draw any analogy between dog biscuits and food for human consumption, it will be interesting to watch the results of this experiment. Dogs are certainly not interested in eating things that are good for them regardless of flavour, and if our canine friends accept the new preparations it will at least indicate that a palatable product has been obtained. The palatability of food can only be determined in use. It is feared, for example, that dehydrated vegetables would tend to become monotonous in constant use. General consumer interest has, however, been aroused by the wide publicity which has been given the industry, and already commercial dehydrators in the United States are studying the possibilities of civilian markets. The future of this development would appear to depend upon the assurance of quality, as the convenience of such products is undeniable.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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