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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Brittany Paloma Fiedler, Rosan Mitola and James Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an academic library at one of the most diverse universities in the country responded to the 2016 election through the newly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an academic library at one of the most diverse universities in the country responded to the 2016 election through the newly formed Inclusion and Equity Committee and through student outreach.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper details the context of the 2016 election and the role of social justice in librarianship. It offers ideas for how library diversity committees can address professional development, recruitment and retention efforts and cultural humility. It highlights student outreach efforts to support marginalized students, educate communities and promote student activism. Finally, it offers considerations and suggestions for librarians who want to engage in this work.

Findings

This paper shows that incorporating social justice, diversity, equity and inclusion requires individuals taking action. If institutions want to focus on any of these issues, they need to formally include them in their mission, vision and values as well as in department goals and individual job descriptions. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas University Libraries fully supports this work, but most of the labor is done by a small number of people. Unsustainable practices can cause employee burnout and turnover resulting in less internal and external efforts to support diversity.

Originality/value

Most of the previous literature focuses either on internal activities, such as professional development and committees, or on student-focused activities, such as outreach events, displays and instruction. This paper is one comprehensive review of both kinds of activities.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Richard Reed, Susan Storrud‐Barnes and Len Jessup

This paper aims to explore how community‐controlled open innovation affects cost‐ and differentiation‐based competitive advantage, and to explain how it allows some…

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7364

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how community‐controlled open innovation affects cost‐ and differentiation‐based competitive advantage, and to explain how it allows some sources of economic rent to remain while others are taken away. Although models of competitive‐advantage remain relevant, open innovation means that the main drivers of performance are changed. Open innovation means that there are implications for firms' ability to profit from intellectual property that they do not own. The paper seeks to address those issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The work is conceptual.

Findings

Economic rents from property rights disappear, those from economies of scale and capital requirements are reduced, but those from experience‐curve effects, differentiation, distribution, and switching costs remain. Similarly, rents from the difficult‐to‐imitate resources of networks and reputation remain intact, and while those from employee knowhow and culture remain, they are likely to be in reduced amounts.

Research limitations/implications

Propositions are provided for empirical testing. There also is a need to identify breakpoints between open‐innovation benefits and the costs associated with lost innovation skills, and a need to extend this work to firm‐controlled and third‐party controlled open innovation.

Practical implications

For some firms open innovation will not adversely affect competitive advantage but those whose advantage is driven by barriers to entry, skills in innovation and anticipating customer needs, or that rely on proprietary product designs, can lose in the longer term.

Originality/value

Where the majority of work examining open innovation addresses property rights, economic rationales, governance, and processes, this work focuses on the effects of open innovation on strategy content and consequent firm performance.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Avimanyu Datta, Richard Reed and Len Jessup

The commercialization of innovation, which is key to entrepreneurial success, is a combination of several entrepreneurial activities. Building on research from fields of…

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1716

Abstract

Purpose

The commercialization of innovation, which is key to entrepreneurial success, is a combination of several entrepreneurial activities. Building on research from fields of management, strategy, entrepreneurship, economics, and marketing, the paper summarized the extant literature to develop a framework of commercialization and an agenda for future research. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive review of literature, which was comprised of 194 articles across 62 journals in the fields of management, strategy, entrepreneurship, economics, and marketing.

Findings

The literature was categorized into six broad themes of entrepreneurial activities: sources of innovations, types of innovation, market entry (capabilities and feasibility), protection, development, and deployment. Most of the research papers that were reviewed were concentrated on single theme.

Practical implications

Given the identification of six key themes of entrepreneurial activity leading to the commercialization of innovations, research questions were posed as a means to move the research forward by integrating the themes.

Originality/value

This is the first paper in its kind to integrate 194 papers from 62 journals to provide a comprehensive framework of commercialization of innovations.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

The article's aim is to review the latest management developments across the globe and to pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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1671

Abstract

Purpose

The article's aim is to review the latest management developments across the globe and to pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Openness to new ideas from the environment improves firms' innovation performance. As the breadth and depth of searching using external actors and sources increases, so does innovation, and while too much searching can lead to diseconomies and performance deterioration, openness to new ideas from the environment is superior to a closed, in‐house, internal focus on innovation.

Practical implications

The article provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Social implications

The article provides strategic insights and practical thinking that can have a broader social impact.

Originality/value

The article can save busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Open innovation might well be a term that has only been with us since the beginning of the twenty‐first century, but the issues it raises have been with us as long as the market economy has existed. One of Henry W. Chesbrough's key observations, at the heart of his seminal 2003 work on the subject, was that “not all the smart people work for us”; external knowledge should be brought on board in order to maximize potential competitive advantage.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Len Holmes

Despite debate and criticism, the notion of“competence” has risen to prominence very rapidly and nowhas an important place in the vocabulary of human resource…

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1445

Abstract

Despite debate and criticism, the notion of “competence” has risen to prominence very rapidly and now has an important place in the vocabulary of human resource management (HRM). Seeks to explain such a rapid rise by drawing on discourse theory. The discourse of competence may be seen to arise through the convergence of discourses in four separate domains, and thereby gain legitimacy from the stocks of already formulated meanings in these separate domains. Taking a discourse theory approach also exposes the control aspects of competence through the constitution of the individual as a social subject in terms of the inscription of assessment judgements. However, the convergence of discourses has not resulted in complete closure. Concludes with some speculation about the degree to which the competence approach will successfully achieve employer commitment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1970

I'VE said it before, and I'll say it again: Eastbourne is an excellent place for a conference, and I set out for it after five years' absence with the hope that its…

Abstract

I'VE said it before, and I'll say it again: Eastbourne is an excellent place for a conference, and I set out for it after five years' absence with the hope that its handsome and genial presence would produce something better than the mixture of ordinary, obvious and sometimes inaudible papers that have been a constituent of more than one intervening conference. That towns can affect such occasions is no doubt a farfetched conceit, but they certainly affect me; as soon as I arrived the environmental magic worked, and old friends and new faces were seen in the golden light of perfect autumn weather.

Details

New Library World, vol. 72 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1971

We are growing accustomed to shock tactics of the US Administration in dealing with toxic residues in food or additives which are a hazard to man, as well as the daily…

Abstract

We are growing accustomed to shock tactics of the US Administration in dealing with toxic residues in food or additives which are a hazard to man, as well as the daily press infusing sensation, even melodrama, into them, but the recent action of the FDA in calling in from the food market several million cans of tuna and other deep sea fish because of the presence of mercury has had the worthwhile effect of drawing world attention to the growing menace of environmental pollution. The level of mercury in the fish is immaterial; it should never have been there at all, but it stresses the importance of the food chain in the danger to man and animal life generally, including fish beneath the sea. Without underestimating risks of pollution in the atmosphere from nuclear fission products, from particulate matter carried in the air by inhalation or even skin absorption, food and drink, which includes aqua naturale would seem to be the greatest danger to life. What these recent events illustrate in a dramatic manner, however, is the extent of pollution.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 73 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Bob Mansfield

Argues that functional analysis has been misrepresented andmisinterpreted. Refutes the idea that functional analysis claims to beobjective, empirical or reductionist…

Abstract

Argues that functional analysis has been misrepresented and misinterpreted. Refutes the idea that functional analysis claims to be objective, empirical or reductionist. Suggests rather, that it is based on a process of “interpretative understanding” of best practice and future requirements. Disputes the criticism that functional analysis ignores the importance of process in favour of simply describing the tangible results of system activity, and that it is solely concerned with the technical component of work performance, ignoring its social context.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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