Search results

1 – 10 of 49
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1982

Roger Stuart and Len Holmes

For a number of years now, parties to management learning events (and we include learners as well as trainers!) have been involved in debates as to the “best” trainer styles—as…

Abstract

For a number of years now, parties to management learning events (and we include learners as well as trainers!) have been involved in debates as to the “best” trainer styles—as defined by the type of relationships that can be established between trainer and learner. Our own ex‐perience has indicated that there is no single, best, “all‐purpose” trainer style, but that successful trainers are likely to be those:

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Len Holmes and Paul Joyce

A critical response to the present stage in the development ofmanagement education is presented. The concept of competence isevaluated and its utility assessed. In particular, the…

Abstract

A critical response to the present stage in the development of management education is presented. The concept of competence is evaluated and its utility assessed. In particular, the use of the term by the Management Charter Initiative (MCI) is thrown into critical focus and found to be pragmatically and conceptually flawed. Emphasizes the importance of addressing the approach actually adopted by the MCI and other agencies in the “reform” of vocational qualifications and argues that the MCI has been incorrectly criticized for attempting to impose a simplistic model of management. Considers the implications and argues that management educators and developers are faced with a dominant concept of “competence” which they find difficult to realize in their educational practice. Subjects the concept of competence to conceptual analysis in order to bring into focus the key analytical elements implicit in the term, assesses the MCI approach and offers alternative approaches which place the emphasis on those issues which are critical for achieving consensually desired enhancements in management education and development.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Yochanan Altman and Len Holmes

Mayrhofer and Iellatchitch's discussion of rites of passage in the context of contemporary careers raises some concerns as to the usefulness of the concept as well as to its…

771

Abstract

Purpose

Mayrhofer and Iellatchitch's discussion of rites of passage in the context of contemporary careers raises some concerns as to the usefulness of the concept as well as to its transferability across disciplines. This rejoinder maintains that, while the employment of rites of passage should be welcomed, its use in career discourse should be made with caution and reserve.

Design/methodology/approach

Asks searching questions in pursuit of the above.

Findings

That some controversial points are raised in Mayrhofer and Iellatchitch's article.

Originality/value

This presents the other side of the subject of the original article.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Stephen Little, Len Holmes and Margaret Grieco

Both critics and proponents of globalisation tend to assume that it is a uniform process leading to a flattening of the cultural terrain. In contrast, this paper, using examples…

2365

Abstract

Both critics and proponents of globalisation tend to assume that it is a uniform process leading to a flattening of the cultural terrain. In contrast, this paper, using examples from Africa, Indonesia, Malaysia, Japan and Canada, demonstrates a more complex interaction between traditional cultural practices and modern communication forms. The new information technologies enable universal access to authentic local voice. Archiving social and cultural practices has historically been the business of museums, universities, and indeed oral traditions of song and poetry. New information technologies provide for cultural continuities and reflexivities: they enable the routine archiving of social and cultural practice at a minimal cost through hypertext, Web pages and universal access. The “globalisation of culture”, so often discussed, needs to be reframed with reference to this highly overlooked indigenous capability to archive own culture. This paper attempts to provide such a reframing.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Len Holmes

Despite debate and criticism, the notion of“competence” has risen to prominence very rapidly and nowhas an important place in the vocabulary of human resource management(HRM)…

1485

Abstract

Despite debate and criticism, the notion of “competence” has risen to prominence very rapidly and now has an important place in the vocabulary of human resource management (HRM). Seeks to explain such a rapid rise by drawing on discourse theory. The discourse of competence may be seen to arise through the convergence of discourses in four separate domains, and thereby gain legitimacy from the stocks of already formulated meanings in these separate domains. Taking a discourse theory approach also exposes the control aspects of competence through the constitution of the individual as a social subject in terms of the inscription of assessment judgements. However, the convergence of discourses has not resulted in complete closure. Concludes with some speculation about the degree to which the competence approach will successfully achieve employer commitment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1991

Barry R. Baker

A review of the approach adopted by the Management CharterInitiative (MCI) towards the use of management competences, drawing oncontemporary research and journal articles, is…

Abstract

A review of the approach adopted by the Management Charter Initiative (MCI) towards the use of management competences, drawing on contemporary research and journal articles, is made. In addition, use is made of insights and experience gained through involvement in the MCI Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) pilot project conducted at Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education. Three major assumptions associated with the MCI competence approach are evaluated and a specific facet of the Cheltenham and Gloucester College APL experience, that of high delegate wastage, is examined. An expectancy model of motivation is used along with an action feedback model to illustrate and explain some of the potential reasons for a high drop‐out rate. The model affords an opportunity to provide a rationale to underpin needed action on the part of the major actors within the APL management competence approach. In conclusion, a number of summary propositions predicated by the review are given.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 15 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Jim Stewart and Bob Hamlin

Provides a contribution to the debate in the UK on theappropriateness of competence‐based qualifications. Identifies a numberof weaknesses in the competence philosophy as…

Abstract

Provides a contribution to the debate in the UK on the appropriateness of competence‐based qualifications. Identifies a number of weaknesses in the competence philosophy as currently defined, and a number of operational problems in implementing a national scheme of competence‐based vocational qualifications. Argues that the change to competence qualifications is unlikely to bring benefits commensurate with the required investment, and that the approach will be unworkable for higher level professional and managerial jobs. The first in a series of three, which is intended to stimulate critical debate within the education and training professions. The series will end with recommendations on a way forward within the established NCVQ framework.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

Jim Stewart and Bob Hamlin

Responds to Bob Mansfield′s critique of the author′s earlier work.Examines the criticisms put forward by Mansfield of the analysis ofcompetence and competence‐based NVQs published…

375

Abstract

Responds to Bob Mansfield′s critique of the author′s earlier work. Examines the criticisms put forward by Mansfield of the analysis of competence and competence‐based NVQs published in earlier issues of the Journal of European Industrial Training by Stewart and Hamlin. Provides an academic and practice‐oriented response and argues against the points expressed by Mansfield. Concludes that the original critical analysis of competence and NVQs remains valid and that Mansfield′s critique is not sustainable.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Bob Mansfield

Argues that functional analysis has been misrepresented andmisinterpreted. Refutes the idea that functional analysis claims to beobjective, empirical or reductionist. Suggests…

Abstract

Argues that functional analysis has been misrepresented and misinterpreted. Refutes the idea that functional analysis claims to be objective, empirical or reductionist. Suggests rather, that it is based on a process of “interpretative understanding” of best practice and future requirements. Disputes the criticism that functional analysis ignores the importance of process in favour of simply describing the tangible results of system activity, and that it is solely concerned with the technical component of work performance, ignoring its social context.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Kenneth McBey, Len Karakowsky and Peggy Ng

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the impact of perceived organizational support (POS) on organizational commitment in the voluntary and not-for-profit sector…

1783

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the impact of perceived organizational support (POS) on organizational commitment in the voluntary and not-for-profit sector. The study extends the work done so far on the mediating roles of self-expression and perceived influence.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports an empirical research study which examined the impact of POS on organizational commitment in the voluntary and not-for-profit sector. Survey data were collected from a sample of health services workers (n=275) from a large not-for-profit organization.

Findings

Analyses showed that perception of organizational support positively influenced self-expression. In addition, self-expression mediated the relationship between perception of organizational support and organizational commitment, and both self-expression and perceived influence were statistically significant in their relationship with organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

First, because of the cross-sectional nature of the authors’ design, it is difficult to establish the direction of causality. For example, POS and organizational commitment may be reciprocally related. It is possible that volunteers who are committed may perceive themselves as being valued and contributing members of the organization. Second, the measures used in this study were based on self-report, suggesting therefore that method variance could possibly influence the results. Because the measures reflect individual perceptions, it was not possible to obtain data from sources other the participants. However, preliminary CFA analysis showed that each measure was distinct which should minimize concerns about method variance. Further, some scholars argue that common method variance may be overstated and not as severe as is generally claimed (Lindell and Whitney, 2001).

Practical implications

Given the need to maintain adequate levels of volunteerism, it is of critical importance for volunteering organizations to understand how to retain their volunteers for the long-term, particularly because volunteer turnover can be very costly in terms of decreased organizational morale, recruitment and training, and decreased ability to effectively serve the public. The authors’ study serves to underscore the fact that those organizations needs to be mindful that volunteers need to perceive adequate organizational support and feel the opportunity for self-expression if those volunteers are to remain committed.

Social implications

The authors’ study extends the work done so far on the mediating roles of self-expression and perceived influence in the relationship between POS and organizational commitment in voluntary and other not-for-profit organizations. The results suggest that POS positively influenced self-expression but not perception of influence. It also suggests that self-expression mediated the relationship between POS and organizational commitment, and both self-expression and perceived influence are statistically significantly related to organizational commitment. Even though prior research has examined POS as an antecedent, outcome, and a mediator, there is a paucity of research that has examined the proposed model within the context of voluntary and other not-for-profit sectors. Given the current rate of expansion in the voluntary sector, it is the authors’ hope that the present study will provide an impetus for additional research in this area.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined the impact of POS on self-expression and perceived influence, and the resulting impact on organizational commitment in the voluntary sector. This paper makes a notable contribution to the literature by empirically exploring this understudied relationship.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

1 – 10 of 49