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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

178

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Leith Sharp

This article contributes to an emerging dialogue about how we can accelerate progress towards institutionalizing a commitment to campus environmental sustainability…

4728

Abstract

This article contributes to an emerging dialogue about how we can accelerate progress towards institutionalizing a commitment to campus environmental sustainability throughout the university sector. It seeks to utilize progress made to date, in the field of “greening” universities, looking deeply into these experiences, to learn from them and to start revealing how they may inform us to move into the realm of widespread institutional transformation. It presents a range of insights, lessons learned and preferred approaches emerging from seven years of implementing campus environmental programs in universities both in Australia and the USA. Many of these ideas have been further informed during a Churchill Fellowship, spent investigating campus environment initiatives in over 30 universities in Europe and the USA. To assist in giving further weight to the material presented, it draws upon the work of a various authors of organizational change, leadership and management publications. The subject‐matter is wide‐ranging as it is intended as a starting‐point for the reader to pick and choose ideas that may warrant further investigation in their own university context. Even though many of the ideas presented need further exploration and development, in their current state they may prove of some value to the reader as a catalyst for a different level of institutional analysis.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Clemens Mader, Geoffrey Scott and Dzulkifli Abdul Razak

Numerous policy announcements and articles have been produced over the past 20 years calling for higher education institutions to give greater focus to social, cultural…

3014

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous policy announcements and articles have been produced over the past 20 years calling for higher education institutions to give greater focus to social, cultural, economic and environmental sustainability in their curriculum, research, engagement activities and operations. However, there has been much less attention given to establishing how to ensure these desired developments are successfully initiated, implemented and sustained. It is to these key areas of effective change management, leadership, support and governance for embedding sustainability into the core activities of higher education institutions through transformation that this special issue of Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal (SAMPJ) gives focus. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper brings together a consolidated analysis of the existing empirical literature on effective change management and leadership in higher education transformation with particular focus on the results of a recent international empirical study of 188 experienced leaders of sustainability in universities in Australia, the UK, the European Mainland, North America and South Africa.

Findings

The paper brings together the case for action in the sector, identifies an integrating framework for addressing sustainable development in the university curriculum, research, engagement activities and operations consistently, comprehensively through a whole institutional approach and identifies the key challenges and lessons on effective change management and leadership for sustainability transformation initiatives in universities and colleges.

Originality/value

Higher education institutions often give more attention to discussing what should change in their provision than to ensuring that desired transformations are actually put into practice effectively, sustainably and with positive impact. This paper and the articles which follow seek to address this gap.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1901

IN the meridian of the year the librarian, like other people, turns his back upon his work, and with gleeful heart hies him away to sea or mountain side, there to forget…

Abstract

IN the meridian of the year the librarian, like other people, turns his back upon his work, and with gleeful heart hies him away to sea or mountain side, there to forget for a brief season book and pen and general public, and all the worries which vex the soul of the servant of these three mighty taskmasters. A little before the happy time of freedom a sudden and deep disgust for his work and everything connected with it will seize upon his soul. He feels the need of a wider horizon than that of five by three—the catalogue card. The neatness and order of his classified shelves in which he was wont to take such delight and pride appear to him now but a vanity and a vexation of the spirit. Oh, for something unclassified, like nature, where rock and tree and water and air and sky are not parcelled out and separated one from another, in the trivial sortage of the laboratory or shop, but all are piled together in grand and sharp confusion, or subtly blended in exquisite harmonies which defy the namer and confound the analyst. Then do the days drag slowly along until the curtain of the roll‐top desk is finally shut down, and the wearied labourer goes forth—free.

Details

New Library World, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

I.P. ITTY and J.R. LEITH

The flow field around an oscillating airfoil is evaluated numerically, using the stream function‐vorticity formulation of the Navier‐Stokes equations. An algebraic…

Abstract

The flow field around an oscillating airfoil is evaluated numerically, using the stream function‐vorticity formulation of the Navier‐Stokes equations. An algebraic turbulence model, adapted from the Baldwin‐Lomax model, is included in solving the time‐averaged Reynolds equations. Computed pressure distribution for turbulent flow past a stationary airfoil is compared with measurements. Finally, for the oscillating airfoil cases, the computations are performed in order to determine the history of pressure distribution and to identify the nature of the vortex initiation on the suction surface for laminar and turbulent flow. Our results for laminar flow show that minute circular shaped vortices are formed on the surface prior to the dominant vortex formation. Flattened vortices are formed on the surface in turbulent flow, prior to the formation of the dominant large vortex structure.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

James Love

The issue of export instability exerts an enduring fascination for economists with an interest in the area of economic development. Over several decades a voluminous…

Abstract

The issue of export instability exerts an enduring fascination for economists with an interest in the area of economic development. Over several decades a voluminous literature has emerged embracing debates on the domestic consequences and on the causes of export instability. The purpose here is to examine these debates and an attempt is made to set out different theoretical stances, to classify and examine empirical findings, and to indicate the directions in which the debates have moved. Such a statement of a review article's purpose is, of course, incomplete without more specific delineation of the boundaries within which the general objectives are pursued. Here that delineation has three facets.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1950

AN older librarian, we think, looking at the Annual Report of the Library Association, which is the principal publication of June, must almost rub his eyes in bewilderment…

Abstract

AN older librarian, we think, looking at the Annual Report of the Library Association, which is the principal publication of June, must almost rub his eyes in bewilderment at the recent progress made. In the outer world of libraries, that part which the public sees, there are symptoms, and actual signs, of development; new branch libraries, such as those at Sheffield, at Croydon, and at Dartford, are portents of a sort—pleasant substitutes, and most effective ones, for the larger, orthodox (in size at least) branches such as Yardley Wood, Crossgates, Firth Park and Leith. Greater development must be a problem for a few years to come, as every librarian must acknowledge. It is in the development of librarianship and bibliology that this record of the L.A. is so significant. The bare fact that the Centenary Year sees the L.A. with a membership rapidly approaching ten thousand and an income of £36,000 seems almost incredible. Even more so is the fact, not quite so pleasing, that by £347 this income proved insufficient; but, on reflection, that, too, is a sign of activity. The Association has almost ceased what was once thought to be its main pre‐occupation; its own organization, or, as one of our writers called it, “the moving about of its domestic furniture.” It is now deeply concerned with international librarianship, an attitude which in no small measure it owes to Mr. H. M. Cashmore and to Mr. Welsford's flair as host at Chaucer House; its gradual adjustment of its benefits, including the education ones, so that they appeal to other than public librarians, as they formerly did, and to such an extent that over one thousand special and university librarians are grouped in it; the immense, for it is that, educational and examination scheme, which from the accounts appears to cost: the administration about £1,900 more than the candidates' fees provide; its extending publishing business, now costing in all £12,150 a year, but bringing in returns more valuable than the substantial sales would suggest, and the quite remarkable library, information, and research work. The Association has become a large business, influencing the life of every librarian and energizing most of the work now done in libraries. The Report has a general acknowledgment paragraph recording the debt owed to the chairmen of committees. It is a modest tribute to a group of men who give great labours to our interests. To be the chairman of a Library Association Committee today is to be a leader and hard‐driven worker. We owe them much. And this does not reduce our admiration for the manner in which the official staff of the Association do their work.

Details

New Library World, vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Abstract

Details

Economics, Econometrics and the LINK: Essays in Honor of Lawrence R.Klein
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44481-787-7

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

B.P. Leonard, A.P. Lock and M.K. Macvean

The NIRVANA project is concerned with the development of anonoscillatory, integrally reconstructed,volume‐averaged numerical advectionscheme. The conservative, flux‐based…

Abstract

The NIRVANA project is concerned with the development of a nonoscillatory, integrally reconstructed, volume‐averaged numerical advection scheme. The conservative, flux‐based finite‐volume algorithm is built on an explicit, single‐step, forward‐in‐time update of the cell‐average variable, without restrictions on the size of the time‐step. There are similarities with semi‐Lagrangian schemes; a major difference is the introduction of a discrete integral variable, guaranteeing conservation. The crucial step is the interpolation of this variable, which is used in the calculation of the fluxes; the (analytic) derivative of the interpolant then gives sub‐cell behaviour of the advected variable. In this paper, basic principles are described, using the simplest possible conditions: pure one‐dimensional advection at constant velocity on a uniform grid. Piecewise Nth‐degree polynomial interpolation of the discrete integral variable leads to an Nth‐order advection scheme, in both space and time. Nonoscillatory results correspond to convexity preservation in the integrated variable, leading naturally to a large‐Δt generalisation of the universal limited. More restrictive TVD constraints are also extended to large Δt. Automatic compressive enhancement of step‐like profiles can be achieved without exciting “stair‐casing”. One‐dimensional simulations are shown for a number of different interpolations. In particular, convexity‐limited cubic‐spline and higher‐order polynomial schemes give very sharp, nonoscillatory results at any Courant number, without clipping of extrema. Some practical generalisations are briefly discussed.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2018

Stephen Brown and Roel Wijland

Much has been written about metaphor in marketing. Much less has been written about simile and metonymy. It is widely assumed that they are types of metaphor. Some…

Abstract

Purpose

Much has been written about metaphor in marketing. Much less has been written about simile and metonymy. It is widely assumed that they are types of metaphor. Some literary theorists see them as significantly different things. If this is the case, then there are implications for marketing theory and thought.

Design/methodology/approach

In keeping with literary tradition, this paper comprises a wide-ranging reflective essay, not a tightly focussed empirical investigation. A combination of literature review and conceptual contemplation, it challenges convention by “reading against the grain”.

Findings

The essay reveals that, far from being part of metaphor’s supporting cast, simile and metonymy are stars in themselves. With the aid of three concise cases-in-point – relationship marketing (RM), the consumer odyssey (CO) and Kotler’s generic concept (GC) – the authors present an alternative interpretation of their conceptual contribution and continuing importance.

Practical implications

Marketing management is replete with metaphorical speculation (positioning, warfare, myopia and more). The shortcomings of such figures of speech are rarely spelled out, much less foregrounded. By raising figurative consciousness, marketing practice is furthered.

Originality/value

As similes and metonymies are rarely spoken about in marketing scholarship, the study starts a much-needed conversation. It raises the issue of marketing’s figurative foundations and, in so doing, offers further scope for future debate.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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