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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Irma Tikkanen and Leila Jaakkola

The purpose of this paper is to present the sustainable value chain activities that have been implemented when providing sustainable food services and sustainable value. A…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the sustainable value chain activities that have been implemented when providing sustainable food services and sustainable value. A municipal catering organisation in Finland is introduced as an example.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework comprises sustainability as a strategy and the value chain and its sustainability. Existing research on the sustainability of food services and sustainable value in the professional kitchens is described. The primary data were collected from the two representatives of the case organisation using a written questionnaire with open-ended questions. Furthermore, secondary data from the web pages of the case organisation were utilised. The sustainable actions were categorised using a pattern-matching logic.

Findings

The findings illustrate the implemented pragmatic sustainable actions in all primary and support activities, which are local, national and international. These actions were based on the owner municipality’s strategy of sustainable development. Economic, social and ecological sustainable values were achieved.

Practical implications

The case description may act as a reference model for a catering organisation when targeting sustainable food services and sustainable value. The case might also be utilised as a teaching case in hospitality management schools. The paper contributes to the pragmatic view of sustainability by describing the everyday working orientation of the case organisation.

Originality/value

The case provides practical information on how to achieve sustainable economic, social and ecological values in municipal food services.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Irma Tikkanen and Leila Jaakkola

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore evaluating the nutritional quality of menus by using software in professional kitchens.

Design/methodology/approach

Nutritional quality and the core factors used when evaluating the nutritional quality of menus are discussed. The empirical data were collected in 2008 by theme interviewing nine municipal food service employees. The data were analysed by a thematic analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that both positive and contributing factors emerged as follows: productisation of menu; using a plate model; length of a control period concerning the nutritional quality of the menu; checking the nutrition content when making changes in menus, dishes and food items; dealing with the results of the evaluation in the meetings; including the results in the service agreements; employers' positive attitude displayed towards software suppliers' training; including nutritional quality as a part of service quality; and implementing nutritional quality according to the job descriptions.

Practical implications

A variety of courses should be offered for the students concerning the guidance of food production by using software in professional kitchens; integrating working life into the curriculum; continuous training of the food service personnel; and cooperation with the professional kitchen's software suppliers. Moreover, further implications could involve, for example, developing and diffusing the national model for the nutritional quality follow‐up; and taking the Sinfos‐product information data bank into use.

Originality/value

Active updating of the software and training of the employees are needed in order to ensure the nutritional quality of menus.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Henna M. Leino, Leila Hurmerinta and Birgitta Sandberg

Secondary customers often experience secondary vulnerabilities that manifest in family-centred transformative services as other- and self-related customer needs. Yet, a…

Abstract

Purpose

Secondary customers often experience secondary vulnerabilities that manifest in family-centred transformative services as other- and self-related customer needs. Yet, a relational perspective on primary and secondary customers’ needs is lacking. The study analyses secondary customers’ needs and their relationship to primary customers’ needs to enhance well-being in customer entities. The service inclusion lens is used to understand customers’ experiences of vulnerability.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an exploratory approach. The data consists of ethnographic observations and interviews of elderly residents (primary customers), their family members (secondary customers) and nurses in two nursing homes.

Findings

Primary and secondary customers’ needs are interrelated (or unrelated) in four ways: they are separate, congruent, intertwined or discrepant. The vulnerability experiences fluctuate in intensity and over time, individually reflecting on these need dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to service research concerning customers’ experiences of vulnerability, secondary customers and their inclusion in services. Primary customers’ service inclusion may increase/decrease secondary customers’ service inclusion and their experience of vulnerability. Moreover, secondary customers’ inclusion is often necessary to foster primary customers’ inclusion and well-being.

Practical implications

Fostering service inclusion and well-being for primary and secondary customers requires balanced inclusion and acknowledging the needs of both groups. Service providers may need to act as moderators within customer entities if discrepant needs occur.

Originality/value

The study addresses the under-researched areas of family members’ customer needs, their relation to primary customers’ needs, experiences of secondary vulnerability and context-related vulnerability.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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