Search results

1 – 10 of 18
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Leena Aalto, Pia Sirola, Tiina Kalliomäki-Levanto, Marjaana Lahtinen, Virpi Ruohomäki, Heidi Salonen and Kari Reijula

The challenges arising from the reform of the social and healthcare sector call for efficient, effective and novel processes in both public and private health and medical…

Abstract

Purpose

The challenges arising from the reform of the social and healthcare sector call for efficient, effective and novel processes in both public and private health and medical care. Facilities need to be designed to suit the new processes and to offer usable workspaces at different levels of healthcare services. Along with traditional construction, modular facility innovations could be one solution to these pressures. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study analyzed the different usability characteristics of the work environment in modular and non-modular healthcare facilities (HCFs). The qualitative research method was based on semi-structured interviews of employees and observations of the case buildings.

Findings

According to the results, the usability characteristics were divided into four main categories: functionality, healthiness, safety/security and comfort. The main differences between the modular and non-modular facilities appeared to be room size, soundproofing, safety issues and the utilization of colors and artwork, which were all perceived as better realized in the non-modular facilities. The staff highlighted functionality as the most important characteristic in their work environment. They even considered functionality as a feature of a comfortable work environment.

Originality/value

This paper presents new knowledge and a detailed description of the opinions and experiences of healthcare professionals concerning a user-centric, usable environment in the context of modular and non-modular HCFs.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Leena Aalto, Sanna Lappalainen, Heidi Salonen and Kari Reijula

As hospital operations are undergoing major changes, comprehensive methods are needed for evaluating the indoor environment quality (IEQ) and usability of workspaces in…

Abstract

Purpose

As hospital operations are undergoing major changes, comprehensive methods are needed for evaluating the indoor environment quality (IEQ) and usability of workspaces in hospital buildings. The purpose of this paper is to present a framework of the characteristics that have an impact on the usability of work environments for hospital renovations, and to use this framework to illustrate the usability evaluation process in the real environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The usability of workspaces in hospital environments was evaluated in two hospitals, as an extension of the IEQ survey. The evaluation method was usability walk-through. The main aim was to determine the usability characteristics of hospital facility workspaces that support health, safety, good indoor air quality, and work flow.

Findings

The facilities and workspaces were evaluated by means of four main themes: orientation, layout solution, working conditions, and spaces for patients. The most significant usability flaws were cramped spaces, noise/acoustic problems, faulty ergonomics, and insufficient ventilation. Due to rooms being cramped, all furnishing directly caused functionality and safety problems in these spaces.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a framework that links different design characteristics to the usability of hospital workspaces that need renovation.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Leena Aalto and Arto Saari

The goal of this study is to perform an economic comparison of alternative service concepts designed to improve the productivity of nursing care in a refurbishment project…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to perform an economic comparison of alternative service concepts designed to improve the productivity of nursing care in a refurbishment project of selected sheltered housing facility.

Design/methodology/approach

Four different service development options were identified for the dining and kitchen facilities: the dining facilities were either decentralised or centralised, and the meals were prepared on site or brought in from outside.

Findings

The form of dining model chosen affected the operating costs more than the spatial costs. The biggest differences in operating costs were attributable to the meal price and to the costs of transferring disabled residents to the dining area. The study showed that the option which had the lowest spatial costs surprisingly had the highest total costs. This was the option in which the meals were conveyed to the decentralised dining rooms located on the different floors by the food supplier. The total costs of this option were 50 per cent higher than the total costs of the decentralised option with on‐site cooking facilities. The centralised dining option with externalised food service had considerably lower renovation costs but 15 per cent higher total costs than the lowest cost option (decentralised dining option with own kitchen).

Originality/value

The paper provides a practical model for taking into account not only remodelling costs but also operating costs in total cost calculations of the remodelling process.

Details

Facilities, vol. 27 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2016

Abstract

Details

The Management Game of Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-716-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 November 2018

Leena Kunttu and Yrjö Neuvo

The purpose of this study is to examine the tension between learning and protection in university-industry relationships (UIRs) and, in particular, to identify practices…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the tension between learning and protection in university-industry relationships (UIRs) and, in particular, to identify practices that facilitate ways of coping with this tension.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical work for the study is based on a qualitative comparative case analysis of six successful, long-term relationships between industrial technology firms and university research groups in Finland.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal that the development of mutual trust, based on personal-level relationships, adaptation and reaching a consensus about the utilization of research results represent the key processes that enable partners to balance learning and protection and lower the informational barriers within the collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

The case data have been collected from IT industry, in which the need for knowledge is changing rapidly and the need for learning is typically high. However, generalization of the results may need additional case studies including from other industrial areas.

Practical implications

The results highlight a rich set of practices that can support both industrial actors and academics in improving their engagement in collaboration and to facilitate successful knowledge creation and utilization in UIRs.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing literature on UIR learning by presenting organizational practices, which help UIR actors to balance learning and protection in their collaboration. Along with mutual trust and adaptation achieved in long-term personal relationships, these practices allow partners to overcome organizational barriers that result from different orientations, attitudes and incentives.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2016

Anne Kankaanranta and Leena Louhiala-Salminen

This chapter argues that in today’s complex, globalised and technologised world, business and communication cannot remain in their separate silos – neither in academia nor…

Abstract

This chapter argues that in today’s complex, globalised and technologised world, business and communication cannot remain in their separate silos – neither in academia nor in practice. The chapter approaches the topic with the help of a case and discusses how communication studies have invaded the fortress of the Aalto University School of Business, Finland. The development of an international Master’s Programme in Corporate Communication was informed by three major research projects in particular, which focused on internal communication practices of multinational companies and the perceptions of communication professionals on the knowledge and skills required of future communicators. Although Corporate Communication studies have been accommodated by the business school fortress for over 10 years, the time has not been without multidisciplinary challenges.

Details

The Management Game of Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-716-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Mervi Hasu, Laura Honkaniemi, Eveliina Saari, Tuuli Mattelmäki and Leena Koponen

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a workshop process to enhance the learning of employee-driven innovating (LEDI) and to evaluate in multiple ways the practical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a workshop process to enhance the learning of employee-driven innovating (LEDI) and to evaluate in multiple ways the practical effects of the LEDI process, which aimed to enhance the employee-driven innovation practices at workplace level in a public organisation. Although front-line employees are increasingly encouraged to participate in innovation, organisations lack multi-level knowledge on the practices, outcomes and effects of participation.

Design/methodology/approach

A six-month development process (LEDI) was conducted to empower front-line hospital support service workers to learn to innovate and to apply this in the services they provide. The process consisted of different themes: future visions, current services, creating new services and evaluations of ideas and innovation embryos. The multi-method evaluation of the process included pre-evaluation of the generated innovation ideas, a developmental evaluation of the selected innovation embryos, a follow-up evaluation of the innovation ideas and an evaluation of the organisational level effect via a quantitative survey.

Findings

The intervention process had positive effects on employee participation and learning to innovate. The conclusion of the four evaluations is that the LEDI process developed a new kind of agency among employees and enabled significant improvements to services. The evaluation of the organisation-level effect revealed that the process had also improved the views regarding preconditions for development.

Originality/value

The intervention method is a practical application of employee-driven innovation conception that is validated as practical and effective at workplace level. The process is a viable method for enhancing workers’ innovation-related learning in service organisations. The novelty of the method is based on the multi-disciplinary combination of approaches that consist of theories of practice-based innovation, expansive learning and emphatic human-centred service design.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Säde Rytkönen and Leena Louhiala-Salminen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of knowledge transfer in the communication of environment, social, governance (ESG) factors between companies and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of knowledge transfer in the communication of environment, social, governance (ESG) factors between companies and institutional investors, when they attempt to reach a full appreciation and mutual understanding.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were gathered through in-depth semi-structured interviews with six European institutional investors. Archival material was used to triangulate the findings.

Findings

Based on the interviews it was evident that ESG is only one consideration in the investment process and that there are several approaches toward integrating ESG. Furthermore, the investors viewed ESG within a financial framework suggesting that this financial framework is part of their vocational cultural professional mental models. Finally, the results indicate that investors attempt to reach a mutual understanding of ESG by carrying out an active dialogue with target companies.

Practical implications

The study indicates that companies should discuss/approach? ESG issues from a financial perspective. The findings also suggest that companies should emphasize the role of dialogue when communicating with investors in order to develop a mutual understanding of the company's ESG performance. Finally, by proactively discussing ESG with investors, companies will not only play a role in developing the knowledge base of capital markets regarding ESG, but this will also offer an opportunity for companies to explicate their own communication agenda.

Originality/value

The paper develops a framework for communicating ESG between companies and institutional investors. The framework depicts the diverging mental models of the two parties.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Leena Ilmola‐Sheppard and Osmo Kuusi

This paper aims to investigate the role of information as a source of resilience in organizations. It presents both a theory based construct of information filters of the

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of information as a source of resilience in organizations. It presents both a theory based construct of information filters of the environment scanning and a pragmatic tool for managing the process.

Design/methodology/approach

The filter construct was tested in three qualitative case studies where the filter setting was changed in order to identify its impact on the results of the environment scan. This paper used Igor Ansoff's theory of information filters as a basis and added the required additional elements by applying complex adaptive systems theory.

Findings

The authors were able to define two dimensions: information filters' width and depth, that define the outcome of the environment scanning process. The preliminary testing of the research hypotheses was possible with the new research tool.

Research limitations/implications

There was only one case that analyzed the impact of connectivity: the role of feedback loops with the external stakeholders and their impact on the outcome of the scanning process. This interesting finding should be studied further.

Practical implications

By applying the filter construct, management is able to either destabilize the organization (for innovation or in order to facilitate a major transformation) or to stabilize the organization (e.g. post‐merger integration).

Originality/value

This paper is one of the rare pragmatic applications of complex adaptive systems theory.

Details

Foresight, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1975

SVEN HIRN, ELIN TÖRNUDD, SAMULI NUOTIO, ESKO HÄKLI, EEVA‐MAIJA TAMMEKANN and KEIJO PERÄLÄ

FINNISH ARCHITECTURE has won fame and honour. This applies to the best of it, of course, the achievements suitable for export and as a trade mark. Our world image tells…

Abstract

FINNISH ARCHITECTURE has won fame and honour. This applies to the best of it, of course, the achievements suitable for export and as a trade mark. Our world image tells nothing of our middling, ordinary buildings. Finland probably has just as many deficiently planned and poorly implemented monstrosities as most other countries. But it is probably characteristic that the end product is technically quite polished. The building regulations are exceptionally precise, partly because of our harsh climate, partly because of the bureaucratic tradition of our administrative machinery.

Details

New Library World, vol. 76 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

1 – 10 of 18