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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Lee Waller, Carla Millar and Vicki Culpin

Abstract

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2020

Megan Reitz, Lee Waller, Michael Chaskalson, Sharon Olivier and Silke Rupprecht

The study's objective was to examine whether and how mindfulness training and practice might impact indicators of three capacities identified as critical for leading in…

Abstract

Purpose

The study's objective was to examine whether and how mindfulness training and practice might impact indicators of three capacities identified as critical for leading in the twenty-first century: resilience, leading in complex contexts and collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a non-randomised wait-list controlled study with 57 senior leaders (81 per cent female) who undertook an eight-week “Mindful Leader” programme.

Findings

Our findings suggest the programme was effective in developing leaders in terms of their mindfulness, resilience and self-perceived leadership competencies such as collaboration and agility in complex situations. The amount of mindfulness practice the leaders undertook was associated with improvements in mindfulness, resilience and collaboration. Furthermore, participants reported that the programme was beneficial for them as leaders and that the training format was feasible. However, objective measures of cognitive functioning and leadership competence did not improve significantly within the mindfulness intervention group.

Practical implications

Mindfulness practice may be a promising and effective method for leader development. Our results suggest that mindfulness can be learnt and developed by executive leaders, as long as they practice for at least 10 min per day.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate how resilience, leading in complex contexts and collaboration can be developed through mindfulness training.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Lee Waller, Megan Reitz, Eve Poole, Patricia M. Riddell and Angela Muir

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether challenging experiences on development programmes would simulate leadership challenges and therefore stimulate the body’s…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether challenging experiences on development programmes would simulate leadership challenges and therefore stimulate the body’s autonomic nervous system response. The authors also aimed to determine whether increase in autonomic arousal would be related to learning, and/or moderated by personality variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used heart rate (HR) monitors to measure HR continuously over a two-day simulated learning experience. This was used to calculate autonomic arousal which was taken to be the difference between resting HR measured during sleep and HR during critical incidents (CIs) (HR). The authors correlated this with self-reports of learning immediately after, and one month after, the programme to assess the impact of autonomic arousal on perceived learning, as well as with variety of psychometric measures.

Findings

The research found significant correlations between (HR) during CIs and perceived learning which were not related to personality type. The research also found a significant correlation between (HR) and learning during a control event for individuals with “approach” personalities.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst a significant result was found, the sample size of 28 was small. The research also did not empirically assess the valence or intensity of the emotions experienced, and used only a self-report measure of learning. Future research should replicate the findings with a larger sample size, attempt to measure these emotional dimensions, as well as obtain perceptions of learning from direct reports and line managers.

Practical implications

The findings from the research help clarify the mechanisms involved in the effectiveness of experiential learning, and contribute to the understanding of the influence of personality type on perceived learning from experiential methodologies. Such understanding has implications for business schools and learning and development professionals, suggesting that development experiences that challenge leaders are likely to result in learning that is longer lasting.

Originality/value

The research extends the literature regarding the value of learning through experience, the role of autonomic arousal on learning, and the impact of negative emotions on cognition. The research makes a unique contribution by exploring the impact of experience on arousal and learning in a simulated learning experience and over time, by demonstrating that simulated experiences induce emotional and physiological responses, and that these experiences are associated with increased learning.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Marloes J.T. Claassen, Arjan J. van Weele and Erik M. van Raaij

The purpose of this paper is to seek to investigate performance outcomes of vendor managed inventory (VMI) from a buyer's perspective and enablers for its successful application.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek to investigate performance outcomes of vendor managed inventory (VMI) from a buyer's perspective and enablers for its successful application.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modelling through Partial Least Squares (PLS) is used to identify relationships between four enablers (information systems, information sharing, information quality, and relationship quality), perceived VMI success, and three outcomes (cost reductions, customer service, and supply chain control).

Findings

Buyer‐perceived VMI success is impacted by the quality of the buyer‐supplier relationship, the quality of the IT‐system and the intensity of information sharing, but not by the actual quality of the information shared. Furthermore, VMI leads to three performance outcomes: higher customer service levels, improved supply chain control and, to a lesser extent, cost reduction.

Research limitations/implications

Although theory stipulates a positive impact of high quality information on the success of VMI, this study shows that the effect of information quality is limited in practice.

Practical implications

The results of the survey show that purchasing managers who invest in the relationship with their suppliers and a good IT infrastructure are more likely to get better results from a VMI implementation. Furthermore, this paper shows that while most managers expect major cost reductions when implementing VMI, benefits primarily come from improved service levels.

Originality/value

The study provides empirical evidence of why VMI in practice does not achieve all the benefits claimed in theory.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

How do you feel when you read the word ‘mindfulness’? For some, it will be a welcome reminder that they should be more mindful of everything that is going on inside and…

Abstract

Purpose

How do you feel when you read the word ‘mindfulness’? For some, it will be a welcome reminder that they should be more mindful of everything that is going on inside and outside their heads, and lead almost instantly to a state of calm and heightened awareness – which is, of course, what is should do as that what the word and practice of mindfulness means. For others, however, reactions can vary widely. Some will be completely non-plussed having never read up on the subject, and for others, they may sneer at the latest wishy-washy, mumbo-jumbo that has started to fill up Facebook feeds and cards from Hallmark stores. And for a few, the reaction may be the very opposite of what is intended, reacting violently to a belief and state of mind they are predisposed to dislike intensely.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds his/her own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

How do you feel when you read the word ‘mindfulness’? For some, it will be a welcome reminder that they should be more mindful of everything that is going on inside and outside their heads, and lead almost instantly to a state of calm and heightened awareness – which is, of course, what is should do as that what the word and practice of mindfulness means. For others, however, reactions can vary widely. Some will be completely non-plussed having never read up on the subject, and for others, they may sneer at the latest wishy-washy, mumbo-jumbo that has started to fill up Facebook feeds and cards from Hallmark stores. And for a few, the reaction may be the very opposite of what is intended, reacting violently to a belief and state of mind they are predisposed to dislike intensely.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Seyed Hamid Reza Pasandideh, Seyed Taghi Akhavan Niaki and Pejman Ahmadi

In this paper, the joint replenishment problem is modeled for a two-level supply chain consisting of a single supplier and multiple retailers that use the vendor-managed…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the joint replenishment problem is modeled for a two-level supply chain consisting of a single supplier and multiple retailers that use the vendor-managed inventory (VMI) policy for several products. This paper aims to find the optimal number of products to order in both policies, the optimal times at which each retailer orders the products in the traditional policy and the optimal times at which the supplier orders the product in the VMI policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The problem is first formulated into the framework of a constrained integer nonlinear programming model; then, the problem is solved using a teacher-learner based optimization algorithm. As there are no benchmarks available in the literature, a genetic algorithm is used as well to validate the results obtained.

Findings

The solutions obtained using both the algorithms for several numerical examples are compared to the ones of a random search procedure for further validation. A real case is solved at the end to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed methodology and to compare both the policies.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not have any special limitations.

Practical implications

The study has significant practical implications for the sellers and for the suppliers who have to get the most profit. Also, satisfying the constraints make decision more complicated.

Originality/value

This paper has two main originalities. The authors have developed the model of the joint replenishment problem and have contributed in the problem-solving process. They have used a new meta-heuristic and then compared it to a classic one.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2018

Stuti Saxena

This paper aims to summarize the open government data (OGD) research which has been become an increasingly engaging domain for the academic community.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to summarize the open government data (OGD) research which has been become an increasingly engaging domain for the academic community.

Design/methodology/approach

Scanning the literature on OGD, the paper underlines the different strands observable in the OGD-based research. The paper concludes with research pointers, limitations and implications for practitioners.

Findings

OGD has been investigated from different angles, and there is a need for more empirical investigation across contexts.

Originality/value

The paper serves as a reference point for OGD research.

Details

foresight, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Stuti Saxena

As the ongoing oil prices’ crisis is emerging as a major cause of concern for the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region, the constituent governments are attempting at…

Abstract

Purpose

As the ongoing oil prices’ crisis is emerging as a major cause of concern for the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region, the constituent governments are attempting at undertaking measures of economic diversification to attain long-term sustainability. The author posits that open government data (OGD) has a significant role to play in facilitating the economic turnaround of the GCC region, given that OGD promotes innovation and economic growth besides providing avenues for collaboration and participation among different stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a structured literature review, the paper scans literature on OGD followed by providing a typology of countries on the basis of their OGD-adherence (“laggard”, “caged”, “forerunner” and “champ”). This is followed by a discussion on the ongoing oil prices’ crisis, and evidentiary support is lent by examples from the OGD portals of each of the six GCC countries (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates) to provide indicators as to how a robust OGD implementation may support their economic diversification objectives.

Findings

Although the present OGD framework of the GCC is relatively weak, it is asserted that OGD has immense potential in facilitating the economic diversification initiatives of the GCC countries. Therefore, the GCC needs to strategize upon institutionalization of their OGD initiatives for realizing their “vision” and goals of economic diversification to result in an economic turnaround effectively.

Originality/value

Besides providing a typology of countries as OGD-adherents and categorizing GCC as “forerunner(s)” on the basis of the typology, the originality of the study lies in its attempt to answer the research question: “what is the role of the OGD in facilitating the economic diversification of the GCC?” Conceding that the research on OGD in the GCC context is few and far between, the present study is a significant contribution to the extant literature pertaining to the roll-out of OGD in developing countries.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Stuti Saxena

With the ongoing drives towards Open Government Data (OGD) initiatives across the globe, governments have been keen on pursuing their OGD policies to ensure transparency…

Abstract

Purpose

With the ongoing drives towards Open Government Data (OGD) initiatives across the globe, governments have been keen on pursuing their OGD policies to ensure transparency, collaboration and efficiency in administration. As a developing country, India has recently adopted the OGD policy (www.data.gov.in); however, the percolation of this policy in the States has remained slow. This paper aims to underpin the “asymmetry” in OGD framework as far as the Indian States are concerned. Besides, the study also assesses the contribution of “Open Citizens” in furthering the OGD initiatives of the country.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative following a case study approach informs the present study using documentary analysis where evidentiary support from five Indian States (Uttar Pradesh, Telangana, West Bengal, Sikkim and Gujarat) is being drawn to assess the nature and scope of the OGD framework. Further, conceptualization for “Open Citizen” framework is provided to emphasize upon the need to have aware, informed and pro-active citizens to spearhead the OGD initiatives in the country.

Findings

While the National OGD portal has a substantial number of data sets across different sectors, the States are lagging behind in the adoption and implementation of OGD policies, and while Telangana and Sikkim have been the frontrunners in adoption of OGD policies in a rudimentary manner, others are yet to catch up with them. Further, there is “asymmetry” in terms of the individual contribution of the government bodies to the open data sets where some government bodies are more reluctant to share their datasets than the others.

Practical implications

It is the conclusion of the study that governments need to institutionalize the OGD framework in the country, and all the States should appreciate the requirement of adopting a robust OGD policy for furthering transparency, collaboration and efficiency in administration.

Social implications

As an “Open Citizen”, it behooves upon the citizens to be pro-active and contribute towards the open data sets which would go a long way in deriving social and economic value out of these data sets.

Originality/value

While there are many studies on OGD in the West, studies focused upon the developing countries are starkly lacking. This study plugs this gap by attempting a comparative analysis of the OGD frameworks across Indian States. Besides, the study has provided a conceptualization of “Open Citizen” (OGD) which may be tapped for further research in developing and developed countries to ascertain the linkage between OGD and OC.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

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