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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Michael K. Muchiri, Ray W. Cooksey, Lee V. Di Milia and Fred O. Walumbwa

This paper seeks to examine gender‐ and management‐ level differences in perceptions of effective leadership within a framework of new leadership models that focus on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine gender‐ and management‐ level differences in perceptions of effective leadership within a framework of new leadership models that focus on the processes of influencing self and others rather than leadership based on hierarchy.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐report questionnaire was distributed to a sample of council employees. The responses were analysed using thematic matrix displays.

Findings

Males and non‐management employees (when compared with female and management) perceived effective leadership as that which emphasises fairness, equality and honesty, develops staff, fosters workplace harmony, and is trustworthy. Female employees emphasised communication, decision‐making ability, and supporting the leader as being important to how a work unit could contribute to organizational leadership effectiveness. Employees at the management level underscored vision, supporting the leader, and integrity as being important to how a work unit could contribute to organizational leadership effectiveness. Female and non‐management employees highlighted employee development, contingent reward, communication and vision as being central to how organizational leadership could contribute to the effectiveness of the work unit.

Originality/value

Unlike the literature that differentiates between charismatic and transformational forms of leadership, this paper views these two constructs as both being components of transformational leadership.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Connie Zheng, John Rolfe, Lee Di Milia and Phil Bretherton

This paper aims to propose a conceptual framework to explore the link between strategic human resource management (SHRM) and firm performance of the coal mining companies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a conceptual framework to explore the link between strategic human resource management (SHRM) and firm performance of the coal mining companies in Central Queensland (CQ), Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews literature relating to the process and issues of transforming human resource practices and industrial relations of the coal industry in Australia for the past decade. Theoretical development and empirical studies on the SHRM‐performance linkage are discussed. Based on the literature review, the paper develops an integrated model for testing the relationship between SHRM and firm performance in the context of CQ's coalmines and proposes a number of research propositions.

Findings

Three perceivable outcomes are likely derived from application of this framework in the field. First, a testing of the linkage between strategic HRM and firm performance in the coal industry, using an integrated approach, would complement the empirical deficiency of treatments on the prior SHRM models. Second, data at firm level could be collected to develop a better understanding of how the adoption of strategic HRM practices in coal companies can affect firm performance. Third, the extent of flexibility practices, use of contractors and associated management practices could be identified.

Originality/value

The coal industry is central to economic development of regional Queensland. The industry contributes substantially to GDP via employment, investment and product export. An exploration of the impact of SHRM on the coal industry will likely result in identifying some best practices that could be potentially adopted in the wider business community to foster regional economic development in Australia and worldwide.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Sue Lancaster and Lee Di Milia

This paper aims to describe the forms of organisational support that employees perceived as helpful to support their learning. This study aims to explore how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the forms of organisational support that employees perceived as helpful to support their learning. This study aims to explore how organisational support is distinct from other kinds of learning support.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative exploratory study utilising a cross-sectional design. Interviews were conducted in a large multi-site Australian organisation with 24 graduates from four leadership development programmes.

Findings

The results from this study extend the literature relating to work environment as an important factor in supporting employee learning. We differentiate between the types of support that employees perceived the organisation provided from other types of learning support. The results suggest that for organisations to positively impact employees’ learning, they should pay attention to three key factors: provide high-quality relevant development programmes; ensure that course content is aligned with the organisations strategy and the employees work; and ensure senior management commitment throughout all aspects of the employee development process.

Originality/value

This study gives voice to employees’ perceptions of how organisations can support their learning. It also provides rich data that extends the literature through a qualitative study in a field dominated by quantitative studies.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Thanh Tung Do and Ngoc Khuong Mai

This study aims to systematically review empirical research on the relationship between organizational learning (OL) and firm performance (FP) to evaluate how far the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to systematically review empirical research on the relationship between organizational learning (OL) and firm performance (FP) to evaluate how far the field has come.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a systematic, transparent and replicable approach suggested by Vom Brocke et al. (2009) to conduct a systematic review. A total of 52 empirical studies published over the years 1999–2019 was retrieved and analyzed.

Findings

Three key themes related to the OL–FP relationship have emerged from the review. First, research on OL and FP has been quantitatively conducted in a variety of countries and sectors. Second, dimensions of OL foster both financial and non-financial performance of firms through their combinations and interactions. Third, the relationship between OL and FP is mediated by organizational innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The literature search returned only quantitative studies on OL and FP, which was accepted within the scope of this review. Future studies are encouraged to systematically examine case studies and qualitative research on OL and FP.

Practical implications

This review demonstrates that FP can be improved through different dimensions of OL. Based on our findings, managers wanting to enhance the performance of their firms can analyze the demand for OL and develop those OL dimensions.

Originality/value

This is among the first systematic literature reviews on OL and FP. The findings of this study also contribute to the previously scattered understanding of OL and FP.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Connie Zheng, Lee Di Milia, John Rolfe and Phil Bretherton

The aim of this paper is to set a research agenda which will explore the link between strategic human resource management (HRM) and business performance of the coal…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to set a research agenda which will explore the link between strategic human resource management (HRM) and business performance of the coal industry in Central Queensland, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Key performance indicators of coalmines are collected from official statistics and other publicly available records. A survey instrument is to be designed and used to collect data related to experiences and perceptions of managers and employees in coalmines. Statistical tools are used to test interrelationships between key variables.

Findings

The research will be the first empirical study of the link between strategic HRM and business performance of the coal industry. The research outcomes will contribute to the body of knowledge concerning the relationship between strategic HRM and business performance. Studying people management practices in the coal industry enables us to paint a clearer picture of the key HRM issues currently faced by the industry. As management educators, we may be more able, as a result of this study, to provide solutions to some identified problems in the industry.

Originality/value

The coal industry is very important to sustainable regional economic development. An analysis of the impact of people management approaches to business performance is likely to lead to identifying some best practices that can be potentially adopted in the wider regional business community.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Sue Lancaster and Lee Di Milia

The aim of this study was to examine the factors that employees perceived were important in creating a supportive learning environment in a recently merged organisation…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to examine the factors that employees perceived were important in creating a supportive learning environment in a recently merged organisation. The study provides rich qualitative data from the employees’ perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study used a qualitative phenomenological constructivist approach. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analysed with the aid of NVivo. The study was conducted in a large government-owned organisation in Australia and the sample consisted of 24 recent graduates of leadership development programs.

Findings

The results suggested that together with the organisation’s leadership, there are several distinguishing characteristics of a learning environment. These include learning with colleagues, openness to new ideas and change, building relationships, open communication, sharing the learning, coaching and reflection. Providing support for managers to gain confidence and self-awareness was important to their ability to apply their learning. The results also suggest that learning with colleagues from different regional and functional areas helps to reform subcultures and contributes to an overarching learning culture and hence to creating a supportive learning environment. Some hindrances were also discovered.

Originality/value

This study gives voice to employee perceptions of the important factors required to create a supportive learning environment. The authors used a qualitative methodology in a field dominated by quantitative studies to provide rich data that extends the extant literature.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Sue Lancaster, Lee Di Milia and Roslyn Cameron

The purpose of this paper is to describe the supervisor behaviours that employees found to be helpful and unhelpful in facilitating training transfer. The study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the supervisor behaviours that employees found to be helpful and unhelpful in facilitating training transfer. The study aims to provide rich qualitative data from the employee's perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilises a cross‐sectional design. A case study and a qualitative interpretivist approach were used to interpret the employee's responses. In total 24 semi‐structured interviews were conducted and responses were analysed with the aid of NVivo.

Findings

The results suggested what supervisors did prior to, during and after course attendance was critical to training transfer. Supportive behaviours prior to the course included motivating, encouraging and setting expectations. Practical support provided during the course signalled the value that the supervisor placed on the course. Meetings held after the course provided the best opportunity to support transfer. Transfer was maximised when participants experienced a positive role model and when supervisors showed interest in their experience of the course, encouraged and sponsored new initiatives, and involved them in decision‐making. The main perceived hindrances to training transfer were culture, policies and a lack of encouragement.

Originality/value

This is a qualitative study in a field of inquiry dominated by quantitative approaches. The results highlight the employee's perspective concerning what they found to assist in training transfer. This methodology is rarely evidenced in the extant literature.

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Subhash C. Kundu and Kusum Lata

The purpose of the present study is to investigate the mediating effect of organizational engagement in the relationship between supportive work environment (SWE) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to investigate the mediating effect of organizational engagement in the relationship between supportive work environment (SWE) and employee retention.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data of 211 respondents from 67 organizations were analysed. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the dimensionality and validity of study variables. Further, the hypothesized model was tested with the help of multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The findings suggest that SWE plays a crucial role in predicting employee retention. Organizational engagement partially mediates the relationship between SWE and employee retention.

Research limitations/implications

The data were limited to the Indian setting and of cross-sectional design only; so, it may not be generalized across the world. Further, the sample size is also comparatively smaller but the results are not affected adversely.

Originality/value

The role of SWE along with organizational engagement is currently under-researched in the Indian context. The present study is an intense effort to analyse the mediating effect of organizational engagement in the relationship between SWE and employee retention.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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