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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2010

Lee Quinney

Housing‐related support funded by Supporting People has developed in line with traditional service areas relating to criminal justice, health and social care. This means…

Abstract

Housing‐related support funded by Supporting People has developed in line with traditional service areas relating to criminal justice, health and social care. This means that opportunities for developing integrated services geared to meeting the needs of mentally disordered offenders have been limited. Using a case study to explore service needs, a rethink of commissioning and support roles is recommended for forensic mental health services.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Lee Quinney

Using a recent television series as a start point, this paper aims to explore risk management and the impact of serious offending on individuals and communities.

Abstract

Purpose

Using a recent television series as a start point, this paper aims to explore risk management and the impact of serious offending on individuals and communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Concepts like mad, bad, good, or evil are examined in the context of horrific social events and links to recent developments in government strategy aiming to strengthen and protect community resilience.

Findings

It is shown how the nature of society and modern lifestyles can influence the resilience levels and the likelihood of individuals from all walks of life contributing towards community resilience.

Social implications

Community resilience is positioned with the idea that society should not only support direct victims of horrific events, but also those indirectly affected in the same local community.

Originality/value

The paper argues that the notion of community resilience provides a useful framework for thinking about how, in a risk‐averse society, community participation to promote wellbeing within particular neighbourhoods might be facilitated.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2010

Lynn Vickery

Abstract

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Tim Bateman and Chris Fox

Abstract

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Safer Communities, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Reza Salehzadeh

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new typology for classifying the leaders’ behaviors and investigate the effects of leaders’ behaviors on employees’ resilience.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new typology for classifying the leaders’ behaviors and investigate the effects of leaders’ behaviors on employees’ resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a mixed method research (i.e. interview and questionnaire). First, through the interviews with employees, the leaders’ behaviors were identified. Next, based on the identified behaviors and Kano model the type of each behavior was classified. Finally, according to this classification, the impact of leaders’ behaviors on employees’ resilience was investigated.

Findings

Based on the results of the interviews, 46 leaders’ behaviors which influence employees’ satisfaction/dissatisfaction were identified out of which 10 behaviors were must-be; 5 behaviors were one-dimensional, 18 behaviors were attractive and 13 behaviors were reverse type. Also, the results of hypotheses testing showed that attractive behaviors have a stronger relationship to employees’ resilience than one-dimensional and must-be behaviors; one-dimensional behaviors have a stronger relationship to employees’ resilience than must-be behaviors; and reverse behaviors have an indirect effect on employees’ resilience.

Originality/value

This research proposes a new typology for classifying the leaders’ behaviors into the five categories and the approach and findings of this research contribute to the literature of Kano model and leadership theory.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2013

Ronald J. Berger, Carla Corroto, Jennifer Flad and Richard Quinney

Medical uncertainty is recognized as a critical issue in the sociology of diagnosis and medical sociology more generally, but a neglected focus of this concern is the…

Abstract

Medical uncertainty is recognized as a critical issue in the sociology of diagnosis and medical sociology more generally, but a neglected focus of this concern is the question of patient decision making. Using a mixed methods approach that draws upon autoethnographic accounts and third-party interviews, we aim to illuminate the dilemmas of patient decision making in the face of uncertainty. How do patients and supportive caregivers go about navigating this state of affairs? What types of patient–doctor/healthcare professional relationships hinder or enhance effective patient decision making? These are the themes we explore in this study by following patients through the sequence of experiencing symptoms, seeking a diagnosis, evaluating treatment protocols, and receiving treatments. In general, three genres of culturally available narratives are revealed in the data: strategic, technoluxe, and unbearable health narratives.

Details

40th Anniversary of Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-783-2

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2014

Michael J. Turner

Not all pressured, greedy, and opportunistic individuals actually commit white-collar crime. So what exactly is the common denominator for individuals to commit…

Abstract

Not all pressured, greedy, and opportunistic individuals actually commit white-collar crime. So what exactly is the common denominator for individuals to commit white-collar crime? This study investigates the propensity of an individual to commit white-collar crime and advances personality as an explanatory factor. Questionnaire survey data is collected from 357 undergraduate accounting students in a later year accounting course at a large university in Australia. Personality is measured using the Big Five Inventory. Support is provided for the view that individuals scoring lower in agreeableness and lower in conscientiousness have a higher propensity to commit white-collar crime. While no significant main effect associations emerged for extraversion, neuroticism, or openness to experience, inspection of individual parameter estimates revealed a significant negative association between neuroticism and propensity to commit white-collar crime but only in certain circumstances.

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Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-445-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Joongyeup Lee, Yan Zhang and Larry T. Hoover

Police factor in extra‐legal as well as legal context in their decision to arrest a suspect. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of extra‐legal factors at…

Abstract

Purpose

Police factor in extra‐legal as well as legal context in their decision to arrest a suspect. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of extra‐legal factors at both situational and neighborhood levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Using hierarchical generalized linear modeling, over 9,000 domestic violence cases across 421 census tracts in Houston, Texas were examined. Situational information was derived from police reports, and neighborhood factors were measured by population characteristics drawn from the US Census Bureau. The model also controls for spatial autocorrelation of arrest rates between census tracts in the estimation of officer's arrest decision.

Findings

At the neighborhood level, concentrated disadvantage and immigration concentration had positive effect on the odds of arrest. At the situational level, the time of day, day of the week, premise type, and gender and racial relations between suspect and complainant, along with offense type and weapons use, had significant impact.

Originality/value

The scant literature has not yet provided an affirmative set of extra‐legal factors affecting police arrest decision. The paper's findings may contribute to the literature and suggest the need for guidelines concerning officer discretion exercised in the line of duty.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1974

The growing range of EEC Directives and Regulations for food products, some of which have never been subject to statutory control in this country, with compositional…

Abstract

The growing range of EEC Directives and Regulations for food products, some of which have never been subject to statutory control in this country, with compositional standards, and in particular, prescribed methods of analysis — something which has not featured in the food legislative policies here — must be causing enforcement authorities and food processors to think seriously, if as yet not furiously. Some of the prescribed methods of analysis are likely to be less adaptable to modern processing methods of foods and as Directives seem to be requiring more routine testing, there is the matter of cost. Directive requirements are to some extent negotiable — the EEC Commission allow for regional differences, e.g., in milk and bread — but it has to be remembered that EEC Regulations bind Member‐states from the date of notification by the Commission, over‐riding the national law. Although not so frequently used for food legislation, they constitute one of the losses of sovereign power, paraded by the anti‐market lobby. Regulations contain usual clauses that they “shall enter into force on the day following publication in the Official Journal of the European Communities” and that they “shall be binding in their entirety and directly applicable in all Member States”.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 76 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

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