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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

John Purcell, Lee Dalgleish, Juliet Harrison, Ian Lonsdale, Ian McConaghy and Alan Robertson

The significance of computer technology in terms of industrial relations is an area which has been neglected in the proliferation of literature accompanying the computer…

Abstract

The significance of computer technology in terms of industrial relations is an area which has been neglected in the proliferation of literature accompanying the computer boom. This omission is becoming increasingly serious. By April 1976, the National Computer Index recorded a total of 9,245 computers in operation within the UK, in industry, the commercial and service sectors, public administration and defence. During the decade 1965–74 the population of computer installations grew by more than five and a half thousand and because this figure includes bureau facilities, it certainly understates the growth in the number of end‐users who have come to rely on computer technology. More importantly, the degree of this reliance has increased as the technology has been applied to a wider range of organisational functions. The growing dependence of organisations on the computer has enhanced its strategic position in the work process. Control over the functioning of the computer thus constitutes a source of increasing power which may well be used by employees as a powerful tool in negotiation.

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Personnel Review, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Sandra Kiffin-Petersen

Work design has largely overlooked cognitive–emotional interactions in understanding employee motivation and satisfaction. My aim in this chapter is to develop a…

Abstract

Work design has largely overlooked cognitive–emotional interactions in understanding employee motivation and satisfaction. My aim in this chapter is to develop a conceptual model that integrates what we know about these interactions from research on emotions and neuroscience with traditional and emergent work design perspectives. I propose that striving for universal goals influences how a person responds to the work characteristics, such that an event that is personally relevant or “self-referential” will elicit an emotional reaction that must be regulated for optimal performance, job satisfaction, and well-being. A Self-Referential Emotion Regulatory Model (SERM) of work design is presented.

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New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2020

Hyun-Woo Lee, Heetae Cho, Emily Lasko, Jun Woo Kim and Woong Kwon

In highlighting brain wave responses of emotional processing, the purpose of this study is to investigate (1) the effect of sport participation involvement on affective…

Abstract

Purpose

In highlighting brain wave responses of emotional processing, the purpose of this study is to investigate (1) the effect of sport participation involvement on affective reaction in viewing photos; and (2) the association between affective reaction and behavioral intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using lateralized event-related potentials, the authors examined how brain wave reactions are different based on different sport involvement between two groups where one group had varsity sport experience while the other expressed that they were not fans of the sport.

Findings

Results indicated a significant difference in lateralization between groups. Brain responses were greater in the high involvement group and positively correlated with the intention to attend future games.

Originality/value

The findings in this study elucidate the linkage between one's history of sport involvement and affective brain wave responses. Implications from neurophysiological evidence provide means to further dissect the multifaceted construct of involvement in the field of sport marketing.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2018

Orly Shapira-Lishchinsky

Abstract

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International Aspects of Organizational Ethics in Educational Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-778-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Naomi Woodspring

Abstract

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Baby Boomers, Age, and Beauty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-824-8

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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Neal M. Ashkanasy, Ashlea C. Troth, Sandra A. Lawrence and Peter J. Jordan

Scholars and practitioners in the OB literature nowadays appreciate that emotions and emotional regulation constitute an inseparable part of work life, but the HRM…

Abstract

Scholars and practitioners in the OB literature nowadays appreciate that emotions and emotional regulation constitute an inseparable part of work life, but the HRM literature has lagged in addressing the emotional dimensions of life at work. In this chapter therefore, beginning with a multi-level perspective taken from the OB literature, we introduce the roles played by emotions and emotional regulation in the workplace and discuss their implications for HRM. We do so by considering five levels of analysis: (1) within-person temporal variations, (2) between persons (individual differences), (3) interpersonal processes; (4) groups and teams, and (5) the organization as a whole. We focus especially on processes of emotional regulation in both self and others, including discussion of emotional labor and emotional intelligence. In the opening sections of the chapter, we discuss the nature of emotions and emotional regulation from an OB perspective by introducing the five-level model, and explaining in particular how emotions and emotional regulation play a role at each of the levels. We then apply these ideas to four major domains of concern to HR managers: (1) recruitment, selection, and socialization; (2) performance management; (3) training and development; and (4) compensation and benefits. In concluding, we stress the interconnectedness of emotions and emotional regulation across the five levels of the model, arguing that emotions and emotional regulation at each level can influence effects at other levels, ultimately culminating in the organization’s affective climate.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Julita Haber, Jeffrey M. Pollack and Ronald H. Humphrey

This chapter introduces the concept of “competency labor” and illustrates its important role in organizational life for both researchers and practitioners. In the…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the concept of “competency labor” and illustrates its important role in organizational life for both researchers and practitioners. In the contemporary workplace environment individuals face increasing expectations of competence. However, demonstrating competence is no simple task – rather, to demonstrate competence requires a concerted effort in terms of individuals’ affect, cognition, and behavior. Accordingly, new models are needed that can explain these emergent processes. The present work integrates the literatures related to emotional labor and impression management, and builds a theory-based framework for investigating the processes (affective, cognitive, and behavioral) of making desired impressions of competency at work and how these processes impact critical individual and organizational outcomes. Our conceptual model proposes how growing demands in the workplace for individuals to display competence affect how they think, feel, as well as act. In sum, our work advocates that a new research stream is needed to better understand the “competency labor” phenomenon and its theoretical as well as practical implications.

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Emotions and the Organizational Fabric
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-939-3

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Liem Viet Ngo, Nguyen Phong Nguyen, Kim Thien Huynh, Gary Gregory and Pham Hung Cuong

Internal branding efforts are essential in improving employee performance in services marketing. Drawing on reformulation of attitude theory, this paper aims to contribute…

Abstract

Purpose

Internal branding efforts are essential in improving employee performance in services marketing. Drawing on reformulation of attitude theory, this paper aims to contribute to the internal branding literature by positing that while internal brand knowledge (IBK) is essential for transforming brand vision into brand reality, it is not brand knowledge per se but its integration with other brand- and customer-related aspects that drive superior employee performance. In particular, this paper develops a cognitive-affective-behaviour model of internal branding proposing that IBK results in higher levels of employee brand identification (EBI); this sense of identification then motivates employees to engage in both employee-related and brand- and customer-focussed behaviours (i.e. brand citizenship behaviour [BCB] and customer-oriented behaviour [COB]), which in turn foster employee performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were empirically tested using a sample of 697 from services industry in Vietnam.

Findings

The findings indicate a sequential mediation model in that employee brand knowledge affects employee performance (both objective and subjective measures) through EBI, BCB and COB. Employee brand knowledge results in higher levels of EBI; this sense of identification then motivates employees to engage in employee-related brand and customer-focussed behaviours (BCB and COB), which in turn foster employee performance.

Practical implications

Firms should understand that IBK may not directly result in high levels of service performance, and instead should embrace the culture of self-driven positive brand-connection attitudes that motivate employees to engage in BCB and COB that are consistent with their sense of self.

Originality/value

This study makes a unique contribution to the internal branding literature by unravelling a pathway that integrates employees’ self-related psychological mechanism (EBI) and employee-related brand and customer-focussed behaviours (BCB and COB) through which employee brand knowledge is converted into employee performance.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Orapan Khongmalai and Anyanitha Distanont

Corporate governance (CG) is a mechanism for directing, administering and controlling organisations. CG has become a vital component in driving efficient operation of…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate governance (CG) is a mechanism for directing, administering and controlling organisations. CG has become a vital component in driving efficient operation of state-owned enterprises (SOEs). The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between CG practices and the performance of Thai SOEs.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is quantitative in nature; data were collected through a questionnaire, which was distributed to a sample of 1,140 respondents from 38 Thai SOEs. Structural equation modelling was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results indicate that the board of directors has a direct negative influence on the performance of Thai SOEs. However, management systems play a significant role in mediating the relationship between boards of directors and the performance of Thai SOEs. Additionally, corporate governance practices should be implemented not only at the board-of-director level but also at all levels of operation throughout the organisation.

Practical implications

To develop effective boards of directors, SOEs should be pushed to develop the appropriate strategic management systems (i.e. risk management, internal controls, internal audits, human resource management and information technology). These systems allow boards of directors to access and use important information that will help guide the business process, which leads to performance improvement in SOEs.

Originality/value

This empirical study investigates the relationships between CG practices and the performance of SOEs in the context of developing countries.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Salvatore Moccia

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relation between values and virtues and the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM) and thus to propose a tentative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relation between values and virtues and the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM) and thus to propose a tentative framework of relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual. It reviews some lists of values present in literature, and summarizes them in a more comprehensive list. Then the list of values is summarized in conjunction with a list of core virtues. Thus, it tries to explain the relation between them and the principles of TQM, passing through the two mediating variables passion and trust.

Findings

A model of TQM based on core virtues is proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of empirical data that can validate the model.

Practical implications

Considering the emphasis placed on virtues, the model can have some practical implications in the field of recruitment, promotion, and leadership.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to link values and virtues to the principles of TQM by developing a model of interactions. A novel framework that can provide a basis for further research into the profound nature of quality management has been proposed. Furthermore, some implications that should be useful for recruiters and managers are discussed.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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