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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Muhammad Shoaib Farooq, Maimoona Salam, Norizan Jaafar, Alain Fayolle, Kartinah Ayupp, Mirjana Radovic-Markovic and Ali Sajid

Adoption of latest technological advancements (e.g. lecture capture system) is a hallmark of market-driven private universities. Among many other distinguishing features…

Abstract

Purpose

Adoption of latest technological advancements (e.g. lecture capture system) is a hallmark of market-driven private universities. Among many other distinguishing features, lecture capture system (LCS) is the one which is being offered to enhance the flexibility of learning environment for attracting executive business students. Majority of foreign universities are offering the facility of LCS to their students in offshore campuses established in Malaysia. Yet, very little is known about perception and behaviour of executive business students towards acceptance and use of this facility. Therefore, to bridge the identified gap in academic literature, this study is an effort to explore the causal relationship between existing constructs of extended unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT2), personal innovativeness (PI), intention and use behaviour (UB) towards LCS. Moreover, this study is aimed to extend the UTAUT2 by introducing a new variable, namely, PI in the domain of information technology (IT) (PIIT).

Design/methodology/approach

SmartPLS-3.2.6 was used for data analysis and all PLS-related calculations. For this purpose, a self-administered questionnaire was designed to collect data regarding acceptance and UB towards LCS. A sample size of 481 responses from executive business students, who were enrolled in offshore campuses of five selected foreign universities in Malaysia, was used for testing the proposed theoretical model.

Findings

The results of structural equation modelling (SEM) revealed that, performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, price value, hedonic motivation, habit and PIIT have a significant and positive influence on acceptance and use of LCS among executive business students. Unique to this study is that, findings of this study have highlighted PIIT as an important factor that affects intention and UB towards LCS among executive business students.

Practical implications

By validating and extending the UTAUT2, the findings of this study provide a number of practical implications along with a comprehensive, robust and useful framework for universities to successfully implement technological advancements, such as LCS, to enhance overall learning outcomes.

Originality/value

By investigating the factors determining acceptance and use of LCS among executive business students, using a partial least square (PLS)-based SEM approach, this study makes a sizeable theoretical, methodological and contextual contribution to the overall body of knowledge.

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Pradeep Kumar Nair, Faizan Ali and Lim Chee Leong

This study aims to explain the factors affecting students’ acceptance and usage of a lecture capture system (LCS) – ReWIND – in a Malaysian university based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explain the factors affecting students’ acceptance and usage of a lecture capture system (LCS) – ReWIND – in a Malaysian university based on the extended unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT2) model. Technological advances have become an important feature of universities’ plans to improve the flexibility and accessibility in a learning and teaching environment. For private universities, which are market-driven, it is vital to assess if these technologies influence the perceptions and behaviour of their target beneficiaries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is designed using a causal research design to examine the cause–effect relationship between the study variables. The study sample consists of 398 students selected via purposive sampling. Data are collected using a five-point Likert scale covering UTAUT2’s factors and variables featuring ReWIND’s acceptance and usage. Partial least squares-based structural equation modelling is used to analyse the data.

Findings

The findings show that performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, price–value, hedonic motivation and habit have significant influence on students’ acceptance and usage of ReWIND.

Research limitations/implications

This research examines the factors affecting students’ acceptance and usage of ReWIND in a Malaysian university. The main limitation of this study is that it focuses only on the factors highlighted in the UTAUT2 model.

Practical implications

The results provide a useful framework to the universities for the successful implementation of student-friendly technologies such as ReWIND to enhance their learning experience.

Originality/value

Responding to the need of studies validating the UTAUT2 model in the adoption and use of different technologies, this study contributes to the literature by extending the UTAUT2 into the context of LCS at a private university in a developing country.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

Kanishk Gupta and Nupur Arora

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of key antecedents of unified theory of acceptance and use of technology model 2 on behavioral intention to accept and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of key antecedents of unified theory of acceptance and use of technology model 2 on behavioral intention to accept and use mobile payment systems in National Capital Region, India.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 267 mobile payment system users in National Capital Region was obtained through an online survey. A partial least squares method was used to find out whether key antecedents of UTAUT2 predict behavioral intention to accept mobile payment systems which further predicts use behavior toward mobile payment systems.

Findings

The research substantiates that performance expectancy, effort expectancy, habit and facilitating conditions significantly predict behavioral intention, which in turn significantly predict use behavior to use mobile payment systems. Both social influence and hedonic motivation were weak predictors of behavioral intention.

Research limitations/implications

The research substantiates that performance expectancy, effort expectancy, habit and facilitating conditions significantly predict behavioral intention, which in turn significantly predict use behavior to use mobile payment systems. Both social influence and hedonic motivation were weak predictors of behavioral intention.

Originality/value

The research substantiates that performance expectancy, effort expectancy, habit and facilitating conditions significantly predict behavioral intention, which in turn significantly predict use behavior to use mobile payment systems. Both social influence and hedonic motivation were weak predictors of behavioral intention.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Asanka Gunasinghe, Junainah Abd Hamid, Ali Khatibi and S.M. Ferdous Azam

This study aims to assess the adequacy of unified theory of acceptance and use of technology-3 (UTAUT-3) model in understanding academician’s adoption to e-Learning, with…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the adequacy of unified theory of acceptance and use of technology-3 (UTAUT-3) model in understanding academician’s adoption to e-Learning, with intent of getting more academicians to accept e-Learning in the Sri Lankan higher education context. Limited validity of the model in an educational context led to this study. The emergence of internet-based technology has changed the way people live, work and study. Technological platforms such as e-Learning have advanced educational systems by enhancing learner experience while benefiting teachers and educators in many ways.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a deductive approach and quantitative methodology, in which a theoretical model was tested using hypotheses to assess causality between study variables. The simple random sampling was used to collect data using a self-administered questionnaire that was sent via Google Forms to targeted respondents. The final sample consisted of 441 academicians who responded to factors of e-Learning adoption on a seven-point Likert scale. Structured equation modelling was used for data analysis.

Findings

It was revealed that performance expectancy, effort expectancy, facilitating conditions, habit and hedonic motivation were significant influences of academician’s adoption to e-Learning. However, social influence and personal innovativeness in IT were not significant predictors of e-Learning.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the scope of the study, the factors that determine e-Learning adoption were limited to UTAUT-3 variables. Additionally, the concept was tested from only an academician’s perspective using quantitative methodology.

Practical implications

The findings are useful to higher education institute (HEI) administration, instructors and teaching assistants, policymakers to design and implement their online strategy as well as to make appropriate decisions in getting e-Learning accepted among a higher number of local HEI academicians. It is recommended for the decision-makers in the HEIs to consider the effect of the above findings in setting plans for higher e-Learning adoption. For instance, staff training catering to specific departmental needs, continuous awareness building, periodic reviewal of e-Learning system, e-Learning champions, introduction of policies and guidelines to encourage trial usage would be useful in this aspect.

Social implications

Successful use of e-Learning would help HEIs to overcome certain issues that exist in a traditional classroom. e-Learning facilitates education delivery beyond time and space while supporting enhanced performance monitoring and skill development which ultimately improve quality of output and institutional performance.

Originality/value

The study examined the adequacy of UTAUT-3 in understanding the adoptability to e-Learning. Second, it recognised a set of factors that affect the academic staff acceptance of e-Learning in higher education environments. A useful framework is provided to the HEI’s administration to successfully implement e-Learning systems. This study contributes to the growing body of information system literature by examining the validity of UTAUT-3 framework in the use and acceptance of educational technology in a developing country.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Vishal Jain and Parul Jain

The present paper is an attempt to study Education 4.0 supported by Industry 4.0 tools and techniques. The main purpose of the study is to examine the acceptance and use…

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper is an attempt to study Education 4.0 supported by Industry 4.0 tools and techniques. The main purpose of the study is to examine the acceptance and use of one of the internet of things (IoT)-based learning management systems, i.e. videoconferencing application (Google Meet, Microsoft Teams, Zoom, GoToMeeting, WebEx), by academicians of higher education using the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprises 218 responses of academicians associated with higher education in the Sultanate of Oman. Descriptive and factor analysis of the collected data are employed using SPSS-26. Further, using Amos-21, the fit and validity indices of the measurement model are computed. Various relationships of the UTAUT structural model along with moderation effects of gender and nationality are tested.

Findings

The results suggest that performance expectancy, effort expectancy and social influence significantly predict behavioral intention. In turn, behavioral intention and facilitating conditions also significantly predict the use behavior of academicians for videoconferencing in higher education. Finally, gender moderates two out of four UTAUT relations, but nationality does not moderate any of these relations.

Originality/value

A lot of prior studies investigate several models to use technology-enabled pedagogy from educators' or students' perspectives. There are very limited studies that examine IoT-based learning tools within the UTAUT environment. Additionally, no study is available that considers UTAUT relations for the use of videoconferencing in higher education. Also, in the present study, one more moderator, i.e. nationality, is tested.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2020

Manjit Singh, Manju Mittal, Pooja Mehta and Himanshu Singla

The present study attempts to analyze if personal values, namely collectivism, materialism and environment attitude, have an impact on attitude to invest in socially…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study attempts to analyze if personal values, namely collectivism, materialism and environment attitude, have an impact on attitude to invest in socially responsible investments (SRIs). Second, it examines the impact of attitude on SRI intention which may further be moderated by religiosity beliefs. Third, the moderated relation is further tested separately for two groups of gender.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses cross-sectional data collected from 534 north Indian retail investors. PLS–SEM has been applied in this study using the latest version of SmartPLS (v. 3.2.9) software to examine the complex model of moderation analysis.

Findings

The results of PLS–SEM suggested that collectivism, materialism and environment attitude significantly influenced attitude which further led to SRI intention. The moderating role of religiosity was found to be significant on the attitude–intention relationship. Further, a significantly higher moderation of religiosity was found in females as compared to males.

Research limitations/implications

Besides collectivism, materialism and environmental attitude, there could be other facets of an investor's personality that were not considered in the study. The present research was conducted in India, and Hofstede (1980) calls Indian culture to be collectivistic in nature, where the influence of pro-social and environmental concern on SRI intention is bound to be high; thus, findings need to be tested further at the global level.

Practical implications

Companies and financial institutions can enlarge their investor base for socially responsible products by propagating tailor-made financial products that can keep the personal values of investors intact in addition to providing satisfactory financial returns. Female investors can be encouraged to invest in SRI by promulgating the aspects of morality and ethics in their marketing and promotion strategies; eventually, this will lead to an upsurge in the proportion of female investors in financial markets.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the growing body of research in the area of sustainable investments. This research has contributed to building and testing a moderation analysis of attitude–intention relationship with respect to SRI by adding investor's religiosity beliefs and his/her gender as moderating variables to better comprehend the relationships under study.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Roktim Sarmah, Neeraj Dhiman and Honey Kanojia

The present study aims to probe into the determinants of mobile wallet adoption by millennials with the assistance of extended technology acceptance model.

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to probe into the determinants of mobile wallet adoption by millennials with the assistance of extended technology acceptance model.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected from the students studying professional courses in leading private universities in the north region of India. Keeping in view of the objective and hypotheses, the Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modeling (PLS -SEM) technique was used to test the proposed model.

Findings

The tested model brings into notice the imperative observation, which clearly outlines that there are all significant relationships, which can be observed herein. To explicitly state: perceived ease of use (PEOU) has a significant positive relationship with the perceived usefulness followed by PEOU also shares a significant positive relationship with the behavioral intention, and lastly trust as a variable under study establishes a significant positive relationship with actual use (AU).

Research limitations/implications

Implications for the banking industry are to ensure the safety and privacy (financial information) confidential.

Originality/value

The present study contributes to the literature of mobile wallet in the developing nations.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Burna Nayar and Surabhi Koul

The millennial students are disengaged in the current classrooms. Hence, there is a definite need to evaluate and compare the current learning tools. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

The millennial students are disengaged in the current classrooms. Hence, there is a definite need to evaluate and compare the current learning tools. The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of three learning tools – listening, structured doodling and note-taking – on recall ability of students in the classroom. The authors have specifically compared the effect of Andrade’s (2010) and Boggs et al.’s (2017) structured doodling condition (i.e. shading in shapes) vis-à-vis note-taking and listening.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental research design was used for the study where three groups of around 40 participants each were created. The participants were Indian students (72 males and 48 females) who were undergraduates at NMIMS University, Navi Mumbai. Each group experienced all the three learning methods that are listening, note-taking and structured doodling. It was a 3×3 mixed model design. Listening, note-taking and structured doodling were compared on recall ability. This was assessed using a questionnaire extracted from Boggs et al.’s (2017) study and a self-designed evaluation sheet.

Findings

Across all three groups, structured doodling and note-taking had a higher impact on recall ability than the traditional method. However, the difference in the impact of note-taking and doodling on recall ability was not practically very large. The current finding assumes higher significance in the Indian education set up as Indian students are accustomed to note-taking as a learning tool yet structured doodling had a statistically analogous effect on recall ability compared to a systematically documented note-taking. Hence, a future direction could be to assess the impact of a blended learning tool that utilizes both note-taking and doodling or note-taking through doodling.

Research limitations/implications

First, the authors did not capture doodling habits of the students. Second, the study limits itself to a small sample size of 120 management graduates. The study can be extended to other disciplines like science and technology and also on how the higher engagement learning tools can be utilized in the normal environs of a course in a classroom. A future direction of the study can be to engage students in an activity as long as a regular lecture of about 60 min. A fusion of learning tools that effectively combines note-taking and doodling can be suggested to enhance recall ability and classroom engagement.

Practical implications

Higher order learning tools characteristically require technologically advanced infrastructure setups. In developing economies like India, most educational institutes may not have access to technologically advanced classrooms; hence, the implementation of higher engagement learning tools becomes a huge challenge. The endeavor in this study has been to study the impact and effectiveness of learning tools like doodling and note-taking which do not inherently call for access to advanced technology.

Social implications

In today’s age of globalization, emerging economies like India are seen to be taking center stage. Thus, ensuring that Indian education system is geared up to train students to compete globally and in the same vein, these students have access to higher engagement learning tools – the absolute need of the hour. Hence, the current research aims to bridge the gap between global education innovations and Indian classroom teaching method implementation.

Originality/value

The research has assessed the effectiveness of three different learning tools, namely – listening, note-taking and structured doodling – in Indian higher education setup. The current research is in harmony with the current literature and would function as an adaptation and augmentation of Andrade’s (2010) and Boggs et al. (2017) studies. A very scanty research body on understanding the impact of learning tools on recall ability exists in the Indian education setup. Current research will act as a bridge between global path breaking education research and implementation of in-class teaching methods in Indian higher education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library housekeeping processes…

Abstract

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library housekeeping processes, principally in the UK. It is edited and substantially written by Tony McSean, Information Officer for Library Automation based in Southampton University Library and supported by a grant from the British Library Research and Development Department. Copyright for VINE articles rests with the British Library Board, but opinions expressed in VINE do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the British Library. The subscription to VINE is £10 per year and the subscription period runs from January to December.

Details

VINE, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2018

Muhammad Shoaib Farooq, Maimoona Salam, Saif ur Rehman, Alain Fayolle, Norizan Jaafar and Kartinah Ayupp

Developing on the base of theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between perceived social support (SS) from one’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Developing on the base of theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between perceived social support (SS) from one’s social network and entrepreneurial intention (EI). Moreover, mediating effect of other constructs of TPB, i.e., attitude towards entrepreneurship (ATE), subjective norms (SN) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) is also examined in this study.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involves a variance-based partial least square-structural equation modelling approach for analysing responses from 381 fresh business graduates.

Findings

Findings of this study revealed that SS positively influences EI and also that this relationship is fully mediated by ATE, SN and PBC.

Research limitations/implications

Due to limited resources, cross cultural comparison and multi-group analysis were not performed, which are considered as a limitation of this study.

Practical implications

It is expected that the findings of this study can help policy makers, researchers and academicians in better understanding of critical role of SS for understanding the intentions of nascent entrepreneurs.

Social implications

Further, findings of this study suggest that academicians and policy makers need to take heed towards relatively less explored phenomenon of SS to enhance the attractiveness of entrepreneurial career in fresh business graduates.

Originality/value

This study has proposed a model for assessing impact of SS on EI. By doing so, this study extends TPB in the context of EI. Moreover, findings of this study are a unique step forward, and offer a new insight towards better understanding of the determinants of EI in fresh business graduates.

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