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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Ricky W. Griffin and William E. Cashin

The lecture method for management education is discussed. Thenature of the method is presented, strengths and weaknesses aresummarised, and recommendations for enhancing…

Abstract

The lecture method for management education is discussed. The nature of the method is presented, strengths and weaknesses are summarised, and recommendations for enhancing the effectiveness of lectures through discussion are presented.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Abstract

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Documents related to John Maynard Keynes, institutionalism at Chicago & Frank H. Knight
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-061-1

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Michael H. Morris

There are those who suggest the experiential and action-oriented nature of entrepreneurship makes traditional content-focused lecture a less appropriate pedagogical…

Abstract

There are those who suggest the experiential and action-oriented nature of entrepreneurship makes traditional content-focused lecture a less appropriate pedagogical approach when teaching entrepreneurship courses. This chapter challenges such suggestions, arguing that the lecture should be the centerpiece of entrepreneurship education, augmented by experiential learning tools and other pedagogical approaches. Such a blended model, when built around the lecture, has the potential to greatly enhance learning, improve student retention, encourage student thought and reflection, and better develop entrepreneurial skills and competencies associated with the entrepreneurial mindset. The chapter also summarizes the nature of the content delivered through entrepreneurship courses, classifying this content into three general categories, and concluding that this core content is substantive, complex, and highly inter-related. These characteristics reinforce the importance of great lectures for moving entrepreneurship education forward.

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The Great Debates in Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-076-1

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Shulamit Ramon

This chapter focuses on the value of TED Lectures on the issue of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). It outlines a generic framework with which to understand and analyse…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the value of TED Lectures on the issue of domestic violence and abuse (DVA). It outlines a generic framework with which to understand and analyse the impact of TED Lectures on a theme as complex as DVA is, in the context of popular Western culture. It does so by looking in details at the Ted Lecture of Leslie Morgan Steiner from 2012, which aims to answer the question ‘Why Domestic Violence Victims Don't Leave: Crazy Love’ through her own personal experience.

In the attempt to understand the impact of this TED Lecture we look at the literature on TED Lectures, the unique aspects of DVA, who is the presenter, the impact and its components, the active viewers who sent written comments on the Ted Lectures, the technical effect, the comparison with two other Ted Lectures on DVA, ending by identifying gaps in the analysis provided by the three Ted Lectures.

Presenters share with the viewers their personal experience, as well as their experience as activists in organisations and programmes set out to change the status quo in the field of DVA.

The lectures impact through layers of emotional and intellectual facets, which speak to the individuals viewing them through the lens of their own emotional and intellectual experiences of DVA on the one hand, while on the other hand being also influenced by the mode of presentation and the presenter her/himself.

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Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2009

Willie Henderson

This section will explore the macro-organization of the lectures and the way or ways in which Smith actively signals how the lecture series fits together. The starting…

Abstract

This section will explore the macro-organization of the lectures and the way or ways in which Smith actively signals how the lecture series fits together. The starting point is the lecture, and series of lectures, as genre.

Details

A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-656-0

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2020

Dimitris Kanellopoulos

Information-centric networking (ICN) is an innovative paradigm for the future internet architecture. This paper aims to provide a view on how academic video lectures can…

Abstract

Purpose

Information-centric networking (ICN) is an innovative paradigm for the future internet architecture. This paper aims to provide a view on how academic video lectures can exploit the ICN paradigm. It discusses the design of academic video lectures over named data networking (NDN) (an ICN architecture) and speculates their future development. To the best of author’s knowledge, a similar study has not been presented.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a visionary essay that introduces the background, elaborates the basic concepts and presents the author’s views and insights into academic video lectures that exploit the latest development of NDN approach and its applications.

Findings

The ICN paradigm is closely related to the levels of automation and large-scale uptake of multimedia applications that provide video lectures. Academic video lectures over NDN have: improved efficiency, better scalability with respect to information/bandwidth demand and better robustness in challenging communication scenarios. A framework of academic video lectures over NDN must take into account various key issues such as naming (name resolution), optimized routing, resource control, congestion control, security and privacy. The size of the network in which academic video lectures are distributed, the content location dynamics and the popularity of the stored video lectures will determine which routing scheme must be selected. If semantic information is included into academic video lectures, the network dynamically may assist video (streaming) lecture service by permitting the network to locate the proper version of the requested video lecture that can be better delivered to e-learners and/or select the appropriate network paths.

Practical implications

The paper helps researchers already working on video lectures in finding a direction for designing and deploying platforms that will provide content-centric academic video lectures.

Originality/value

The paper pioneers the investigation of academic video lecture distribution in ICN and presents an in-depth view to its potentials and research trends.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2009

Markus Ketterl, Robert Mertens and Oliver Vornberger

At many universities, web lectures have become an integral part of the e‐learning portfolio over the last few years. While many aspects of the technology involved, like…

Abstract

Purpose

At many universities, web lectures have become an integral part of the e‐learning portfolio over the last few years. While many aspects of the technology involved, like automatic recording techniques or innovative interfaces for replay, have evolved at a rapid pace, web lecturing has remained independent of other important developments such as Web 2.0. The aim of this paper is to exemplify and discuss the benefits web lecturing can gain from a Web 2.0 perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes an implementation of three Web 2.0 features for the virtPresenter web lecture interface. These are time‐based social footprints, a mechanism for linking to user created bookmarks in a web lecture from external Web 2.0 applications and a special web lecture player that enables users to embed their own web lecture bookmarks in wikis or blogs.

Findings

The paper shows how conceptual and technical obstacles in bringing Web 2.0 features like social footprints to web lectures can be overcome. It also makes evident that linking web lectures in Web 2.0 systems require special adaptations due to the time‐based nature of web lectures. The technical discussion shows that many Web 2.0 features require feedback channels in order to communicate information back to servers (e.g. to understand how the content is used) and that most contemporary media players have to be modified in order to support feedback channels.

Practical implications

The paper shows that web lectures can benefit from Web 2.0 ideas and presents examples how Web 2.0 and web lectures can be brought together.

Originality/value

Web 2.0 is a popular trend that transforms the way in which the internet is used. This paper shows how web lectures can be enriched with Web 2.0 features and how they can be integrated with Web 2.0 systems by discussing three implementation examples.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Robert Mertens, Markus Ketterl and Oliver Vornberger

Lecture recordings can be a powerful addition to traditional lectures and they can even serve as a main content source in a number of didactic scenarios. If users can…

Abstract

Lecture recordings can be a powerful addition to traditional lectures and they can even serve as a main content source in a number of didactic scenarios. If users can quickly locate relevant passages in a recording, the recording combines the ease of search that comes with electronic text based media with the authenticity and wealth of information that is delivered in a live lecture. Locating relevant passages in a time based media such as a recorded lecture is, however, not as easy as searching an electronic text document. This article presents the virtPresenter lecture recording system that tackles navigation in web lectures with a hypermedia navigation concept that is improved with interactive content overviews. Apart from navigation in web lectures the article also addresses didactic scenarios for web lectures and issues related to the workflow of recording lectures.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Marjolein B.M. Zweekhorst and Jeroen Maas

In general, active participation increases learning outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to explore how: information and communication technologies (ICT) can be used to…

Abstract

Purpose

In general, active participation increases learning outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to explore how: information and communication technologies (ICT) can be used to improve the participation of students during lectures and the effect of ICT on the learning outcomes of students.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested a specific tool, Soapbox, in a compulsory course of a Masters’ program, at VU University, The Netherlands. During half of the lectures the students were invited to participate using their mobile phone or laptop, for the other half of the lectures, taught by the same lecturer, the tool was not used. The authors compared the two groups of lectures. For the evaluation the authors used observations in the classroom, a questionnaire, in-depth interviews, and focus group discussions with students and with the lecturer.

Findings

The results show that the ICT tool facilitated and increased the level of communication and interaction among the students and between the students and the lecturers. Students’ scored lectures with the tool consistently higher on the item “engaging.” Most of the students appreciated the use of the ICT tool and said that they felt more involved.

Originality/value

Despite the knowledge about the limited learning effect of lectures on larger groups, most of the teaching at universities is conducted through such lectures. The research shows that the majority of the students felt more involved in the lectures with the ICT tool, and almost half of the students feel that the learning effect of lectures with the tool is higher than the learning effect of lectures without. Although observations could not confirm the perceived enhanced involvement, about 80 percent would recommend using the tool in other classes, providing a case for the use of interactive technology in large-scale lectures.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Ed Hahn

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a credit‐bearing information literacy course was enhanced through the use of video lectures to deliver course content…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a credit‐bearing information literacy course was enhanced through the use of video lectures to deliver course content. Students have a choice of how to access course materials: video lectures or reading material.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review shows that, previously, videos have been used largely to supplement face‐to‐face classes or one‐shot library instruction sessions. A description details the production of video lectures for one of the courses that satisfies the information literacy graduation requirement at Weber State University. For this course, a student survey was then used to measure the actual use and effectiveness of the video lectures.

Findings

Survey results indicate that a majority of students use the video lectures, at least partly, and find them helpful.

Research limitations/implications

Results also show that many students are comfortable reading course materials rather than viewing the lectures. As more courses incorporate video lectures, holdouts should become more comfortable with the format.

Practical implications

Video lectures are relatively easy to create, and can be used to enhance online information literacy classes. Students can view the video lectures at their convenience.

Originality/value

Video production tools such as Camtasia Studio are used for library instruction and other face‐to‐face classes, but are not widely used in online courses. Adding video lectures to an online course gives students options on how to access the course content.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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