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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

Cary L. Cooper

Over the years there have been numerous attempts in social psychology to examine the process of influence between change agents (e.g. parents, teachers, clinicians) and…

Abstract

Over the years there have been numerous attempts in social psychology to examine the process of influence between change agents (e.g. parents, teachers, clinicians) and objects of their influence (children, students, patients). There has not been a concomitant effort to do the same in the field of management education, that is to explore the learning mechanisms between a management educationalist (e.g., teacher, trainer) and manager, although the parallels with social psychological theory are obviously there. It was felt that we might briefly examine a number of these theories here with a view to extracting concepts that may be useful in helping us to develop a working model of a learning theory applicable to the management education process.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Richard Dealtry

Experience shows that there are problems arising from the implementation of learning management systems (LMS). Indications are that they are too e‐learning technology…

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1376

Abstract

Purpose

Experience shows that there are problems arising from the implementation of learning management systems (LMS). Indications are that they are too e‐learning technology driven, emphasising the virtual component and neglecting the precursory development of a vibrant and committed formal learning organisation culture and infrastructure. This article aims to investigate the benefits of applying a constructivist methodology in the implementation of new LMS.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is a reflective assessment on the benefits of applying a constructivist methodology when designing and implementing strategic new learning and knowledge‐based organisation development investments.

Findings

The paper reveals a corporate strategic learning management solution (SLMS) approach which is synthesised out of a successful macro‐educational intervention in the UK; that of the Foundation Degree Forward (fdf) initiative.

Originality/value

This process involves using a holistic stakeholder approach that connects with all the management, resourcing and underlying organisational activities which are essential for the creation of a well managed, cohesive and sustainable strategic learning intervention.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Richard Dealtry

The purpose of this paper is to examine the successful design and management of high performance work‐based lifelong learning processes.

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2399

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the successful design and management of high performance work‐based lifelong learning processes.

Design

The paper summarises the process management practices and contextual parameters that are being applied in the successful design and management of high performance work based lifelong learning processes.

Findings

The paper finds that innovations in lifelong learning process design and development are restricted by traditional pedagogical thinking and administrative practices, an over emphasis on e‐learning and insufficient consideration of the holistic contextual factors. Design solutions are dynamically based on the idea of a timeless organic order or meta‐planning.

Research limitations

This paper is an outline summary of extensive lifelong learning process design best practice work with client organisations. As with many innovations taking place at the leading edge of work‐based learning management there is a limited supply of reliable published information.

Originality/value

Satisfying the important questions relating to the achievement of more substantial learning relevance in programme curriculum, the coherence of processes for validating non‐formal and informal learning and the effective value of e‐learning systems, are currently key areas of debate and policy making in Europe in particular. Where public and private sector companies are finding local global solutions these results are of considerable value in informing quality design and the way forward.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

J.F.J. Vos, G.B. Huitema and E. de Lange‐Ros

In the literature on complaint management the importance is acknowledged of learning from complaints. Still, the concept of organisational learning has not yet been…

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4095

Abstract

Purpose

In the literature on complaint management the importance is acknowledged of learning from complaints. Still, the concept of organisational learning has not yet been embedded in the field of complaint management. Therefore, this paper aims to adjust a general model for organisational learning to the concept of complaint management in order to make it operational for this field.

Design/methodology/approach

The notion of organisational learning in combination with complaint management is modelled as a system. This system enabled us to analyse the practices of handling and analysing complaints within six Dutch service organisations and to assess the potential of these organisations for organisational learning.

Findings

The results of the paper categorise a variety of complaint management practices along two elements of organisational learning: triggers and modes of learning (i.e. informational learning or interactive learning).

Research limitations/implications

Further research should include the applicability of the learning model to different sectors or organisations.

Practical implications

This collection of practices can be used as a managerial guideline for improving the processes of learning from complaints.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to embedding the concept of organisational learning in the field of complaint management.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Richard Bawden and Ortrun Zuber‐Skerritt

Presents a conceptual framework for process management of groups involved in action learning and action research. Discusses propositional, practical and experiential…

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3156

Abstract

Presents a conceptual framework for process management of groups involved in action learning and action research. Discusses propositional, practical and experiential learning; and the concept of meta‐learning (learning to learn) in relation to the “learning organisation”. Presents a model of process management that concerns people and process, with implications for research in industry, government and higher education.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The paper extends the organizational learning framework: Structural-Functional (SF)-single-loop or Conflictual-Radical (CR)-double-loop learning to the management accounting literature. The sociological approach of organizational learning is utilized to understand those contingent factors that can explain why management accounting innovations succeed or fail in organizations.

Approach

We view learning as enhancing an organization’s strategic competitive advantage by making it better able to adopt and diffuse innovation in respond to changes in its environment in order to manage improved performance. The success of management accounting innovations is contingent upon whether its learning process involves SF-single-loop or CR-double-loop learning to adopt and diffuse process innovation.

Findings

The paper suggests that the learning strategy that the organization chooses is the reason why some management accounting innovations are more successfully adopted than others and why some innovations are easily diffused in some organizations but not in others. We propose that the sociological approaches to learning provide an alternative framework with which to better understand the adoption and diffusion of process innovations in management accounting systems.

Originality

It has become evident that management accounting researchers need to pay particular attention to an organization’s approach to adoption and diffusion of innovation strategies, particularly when they are designing and implementing process innovation programs for an organization. According to Schulz (2001), there are two interrelated stages of the learning that can shape the outcome of the innovation process in an organization. The first stage is related to the acquisition/production (adoption) of knowledge that results in gathering information, codification, and exploration. This is followed by the second stage which is the distribution or dissemination (diffusion) processes. When these two stages – adoption and diffusion – are applied within an accounting context, they address issues that are commonly associated with the successes and/or failures of management accounting innovations.

Research limitations/implications

Although innovation involves learning, the nature of the learning process does not completely describe the manner in which an innovation affects the organization. Accordingly, we suggest that the two interrelated organizational sociological dimensions of innovations processes, namely, (1) the adoption and diffusion theories of Rogers (1971 and 1995), to approach organizational learning, and (2) the SF (single loop) and CR (double loop) approaches to learning be used simultaneously to describe management accounting innovations.

Practical implications

When an innovation is implemented, it initially can be introduced as an incremental change, one that can be limited in both in its scope and its breadth of administrative changes. This means that situations which are most likely to benefit from its initiation can serve as the prototype for its adoption by the organization. If successful, this can be followed by systemic accounting innovations to instituting broader administrative changes within the existing accounting reporting and control systems.

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

Ali Ibrahim Al-Tarawneh and Raid Al-Adaileh

This study aims at investigating the impact of some selected organizational and cultural factors on organizational learning (OL). It also attempts to study the moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating the impact of some selected organizational and cultural factors on organizational learning (OL). It also attempts to study the moderating role of management support on the influential relationship between these organizational and cultural factors and OL within the context of Jordanian mining sector (JMS).

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive-analytical approach is applied to collect and analyze the data. A survey questionnaire is used as a primary data collection instrument. The study sample includes 400 participants from the seven selected manufacturing companies within the context of JMS. Smart PLS 3 and IBM SPSS version 25 were applied to answer the study questions and to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Organization strategy has a statistical significant impact on OL. Moreover, cultural factors (innovation; teamwork; knowledge sharing) have a significant impact on OL. The results of the moderating variable revealed that the level of management support is not moderating the relationship between organizational factors and OL. Nonetheless, it is revealed that management support is moderating the relationship between organizational culture and OL.

Practical implications

It seems that a continuous management support is an important facilitating feature to motivate a learning culture. Cultural attributes, including innovation, teamwork and knowledge sharing must be taken into consideration as facilitating factors to encourage OL. Gradual changes must be introduced to create innovative, teamwork and knowledge-sharing culture. Additionally, a specific strategic goal should be part of the organizational corporate strategy and action plans must be developed to achieve this goal in a systematic manner.

Originality/value

The inclusion of management support as a moderating factor could add an original contribution to the current body of knowledge concerning OL. Moreover, this study argues that the core concept of learning might be there but a systematic process of learning and the contextual factors influencing this concept still need more concern.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

David William Stoten

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the benefits to both organisations and individuals in adopting heutagogy within management education and development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the benefits to both organisations and individuals in adopting heutagogy within management education and development.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is based on a systematic review of the literature relating to heutagogy and learning theory.

Findings

This paper calls for the adoption of heutagogic learning within management development. It provides several practical examples of how heutagogy may be implemented.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to the literature related to new forms of management development and, in particular, heutagogy.

Originality/value

This paper is an original contribution to the discourse on management development and the contribution that heutagogy may make to the professional development of individuals.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Anja Overgaard Thomassen and Kenneth Mølbjerg Jørgensen

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how Dewey’s notions of experience, inquiry and reflection can increase managers’ capacity to cope with sustainability transitions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how Dewey’s notions of experience, inquiry and reflection can increase managers’ capacity to cope with sustainability transitions.

Design/methodology/approach

Problem-based learning is discussed as an approach for enabling sustainable management learning. Dewey’s concepts of experience, inquiry and reflection are used to conceptualize learning as an iterative “self-corrective” learning process toward sustainability. Two public managers’ experiences of a personal development module in a management education program are used to discuss how Dewey’s concepts work to integrate practice and theory.

Findings

Dewey’s problem-based learning framework has the potential to increase managers’ capability to cope with complex and multifaceted challenges such as sustainability because of its focus on problem-solving.

Practical implications

Management is a social practice. Management education can support management learning if management is perceived as a practice.

Originality/value

Sustainable management learning is presented as an iterative and gradual learning process aimed toward settled inquiry that emerges when sustainable solutions work satisfactory in relation to the multiple and contradictory forces, which are in play in real-life situations.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Gordon Wills

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplacelearning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates whatit has already achieved and from this…

Abstract

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplace learning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates what it has already achieved and from this moves on to realize its full potential – in short, the enterprise itself is the key. Examines in successive chapters: the individual manager and questioning insights (Q); the major systems which the enterprise uses to capture and structure its learning; a SWOT analysis of the enterprise′s total learning; action learning, its contribution to the achievement of enterprise growth, and the role of programmed knowledge (P); the Enterprise School of Management (ESM) as a phoenix of enlightenment and effectiveness rising from the ashes of traditional, less effective management training initiatives; and, finally, the practical realization of the action learning dream, as evidenced by emerging examples of successful and profitable implementation worldwide. Concludes with a selection of pertinent abstracts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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