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Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2021

John N. Moye

Chapter 8 synthesizes the research findings from the processes of sensory cognition into the design and configuration of the learning environment. The focus of cognition…

Abstract

Chapter 8 synthesizes the research findings from the processes of sensory cognition into the design and configuration of the learning environment. The focus of cognition changes perspective and focus from the attributes of an external stimulus to the internal processes of integration with prior learning and internalization into a new cognition of the individual, which is labeled as the individual's learning ecology. These processes provide a plausible model for the design of the learning environment dimension, which internalizes the learning into transformational and ultimately lifelong learning. The processes of sensory cognition provide a viable and practical model to engineer learning cognition in the same way the brain does with sensory cognition. Like sensory cognition, learning cognition is the result of the structure of the learning environment.

Details

The Psychophysics of Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-113-7

Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2019

John N. Moye

The process of differentiating each of the dimensions of learning is demonstrated by the application of three possible conceptual frameworks for each dimension, which are…

Abstract

Chapter Summary

The process of differentiating each of the dimensions of learning is demonstrated by the application of three possible conceptual frameworks for each dimension, which are based on the theories of learning, instruction, and environment. Multiple existing theories apply to each dimension of the curriculum, including one framework that is a synthesis of several related theories. The purpose of this chapter is to demonstrate how theories may be adapted into design templates and used to configure the components of the curriculum. The outcome of this process is to create coherent curricula through the practical application of theories of learning as design templates.

A blueprint template is presented to visualize the internal alignment, interconnectedness, and overall coherence of each curriculum. This template visually depicts the functional interactions between the curricular components as dynamic relationships. This tool reveals the design relationships within the curriculum for purposes of design and evaluation. For curriculum design purposes, this form is used to establish and maintain the alignment among the dimensions of a curriculum (horizontally in the template) as well as the interconnectedness of the components. Engagement with the learning process begins by translating the content of each learning objective into instructional objectives, which aligns the instructional components with each learning objective. The instructional objectives are configured to align the content and structure contained in the outcomes and objectives with the instructional components. In this curriculum design system, the instructional taxonomies of Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hill, and Krathwohl (1956) are adapted as design templates to demonstrate three strategies to configure the structure of the learning engagement dimension into three distinct purposes of developing cognition, skills, or values within each dimension (vertically in the template).

The learning experience in this curriculum demonstration differentiates three distinct instructional functions: the learning of thinking skills, the learning of performance skills, and the learning of values-based performance. A template adapted from credible theories of instruction configures the specified learning.

Three models also differentiate the learning environment dimension of a curriculum. The learning environment is structured to deliver learning through individual, cooperative, or collaborative processes. Although the environmental considerations mostly impact the activities through which learners interact with the content of the curriculum (reinforcement activities, assignments, assessments), the environmental factors influence all components of the curriculum and can be differentiated to promote and enhance learning. From the learner perspective, the learning environment is created by the dynamic interaction of all components of the curriculum to facilitate an unobstructed path to learning.

Details

Learning Differentiated Curriculum Design in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-117-4

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Katrien Cuyvers, Vincent Donche and Piet Van den Bossche

This study aims to unravel the dynamic nature of the process of self-regulated learning (SRL) of medical specialists as it actually unfolds over time in the authentic…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to unravel the dynamic nature of the process of self-regulated learning (SRL) of medical specialists as it actually unfolds over time in the authentic clinical environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal multiple case-study design was used, combining multiple data-collection techniques. Long-term observations offered evidence on overt SRL strategies. Physicians’ observed behaviours were used as cues for in loco stimulated recall interviews, asking about covert SRL strategies and their thoughts regarding a situation at hand. Field notes and audiotaped stimulated recall interviews were transcribed verbatim and integrated in a longitudinal database to map SRL as it actually unfolds moment-by-moment. The transcripts were analysed from an inter- and intra-individual perspective using Nvivo 12.

Findings

Results show a variety of strategies that initiate, advance and evaluate the process of SRL. Different SRL strategies not included in contemporary frameworks on SRL are found and classified as a new category which the authors labelled “learning readiness”. Exemplary for an SRL strategy in this category is awareness of learning needs. Results show that SRL in the clinical environment is found as an interrelated, dynamic process unfolding in time with feedback loops between different SRL strategies. Performance is found to play a leading role in driving SRL.

Originality/value

This study contributes empirically to the conceptual understanding of SRL in the clinical environment. The use of a situated, longitudinal methodology, which goes beyond the common path of retrospective self-report questionnaires, adds to the disentanglement of the process of SRL as it actually unfolds in the work environment.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Heidi, Yeen-Ju Tan and Mai Neo

The aims of this study is to use authentic learning principles outlined by Herrington and Kervin (2007) as an innovative approach towards the development of a blended…

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this study is to use authentic learning principles outlined by Herrington and Kervin (2007) as an innovative approach towards the development of a blended learning environment in a Malaysian classroom at the tertiary level and students’ perception towards this learning environment was studied.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted using a mixed-method approach and consisted of two parts. Part A: the learning environment was designed to be student-centred, supported by multimedia and web technologies, consisting of online learning modules, blogs and social media, as well as being driven by a class project. Part B: qualitative and quantitative data were collected to solicit student feedback on the learning environment.

Findings

Results of the study indicated that students responded positively towards the authentic blended learning environment, as it was found to be relevant to their learning. In an authentic blended learning environment, students became more engaged with the content and actively involved in their learning process. These results show strong and encouraging support for the use of authentic learning principles in the development of blended learning environments.

Originality/value

Universities in Malaysia are only beginning to move towards a more blended approach in designing learning environments. This paper provides some insights to one possible way of designing a blended learning environment in a Malaysian tertiary setting.

Details

Journal of Science & Technology Policy Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Irma Tikkanen and Miia Vakkuri

The aim of this paper is to explore how a teaching restaurant could be developed as an internal research (R), development (D) and innovation (I) environment based on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore how a teaching restaurant could be developed as an internal research (R), development (D) and innovation (I) environment based on the ideas of the students and the teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical framework is composed of constructivist pedagogy. The four types of internal environments, namely learning, development, research, and innovation are described. A case organization's pedagogical model of Learning by Developing is illustrated. Empirical data were collected by utilizing a sentence completion method from the students and the teachers at the case teaching restaurant.

Findings

The empirical results illustrated that a teaching restaurant could be developed from the viewpoints of all four environments. However, the students and the teachers do not necessarily perceive a great difference between the aforementioned environments. Furthermore, the students identify more innovative research, development, and innovation (R&D&I) opportunities when compared to the teachers. The socio-cultural constructivist pedagogy was emphasized in the form of team work.

Practical implications

When developing a teaching restaurant, both the students’ and teachers’ ideas could be collected. Also both cognitive and socio-cultural constructivist pedagogy proved applicable.

Originality/value

A teaching restaurant offers possibilities for constructive learning, R&D&I which can be applied to skills, processes, and services for both individual students and students as team members.

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Vanessa Quintal and Ian Phau

The purpose of this paper is to explore student perceptions of the internationalised learning environment across a particular university's home and offshore campuses. It…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore student perceptions of the internationalised learning environment across a particular university's home and offshore campuses. It addresses three research questions namely: what constitutes the internationalised learning environment for students? Can a university offer an internationalised learning environment that is equitable for students across its home and offshore campuses? And what differences exist in the internationalised learning environment for students in a university's home and offshore campuses?

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 484 completed responses were collected from the university's six campuses in Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia.

Findings

Findings suggested significant differences in the way students perceived of teaching reputation, context-specific curriculum, resources, student-support staff interaction and their attitude towards their university.

Practical implications

These insights could help a university's teaching staff and administrators to focus on specific attributes in marketing the internationalised learning environments of each of its campuses. This could give the university better opportunity for improving the learning process and its outcomes for students.

Originality/value

This paper sets out to define the parameters of the internationalised learning environment and conducts an audit of this environment from the student perspective. Findings suggested significant differences in the way students perceived of teaching reputation, context-specific curriculum, resources, student-support staff interaction and their attitude towards their university. In the market of fierce competition for international students, it is crucial that these positive attributes be part of the marketing messages in any promotion campaigns for universities.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2022

Péter Csizmadia, Sára Csillag, Karina Ágnes Szászvári and Katalin Bácsi

This study aims to investigate the characteristics of learning environments and the related human resource (HR) practices in two Hungarian information technology (IT…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the characteristics of learning environments and the related human resource (HR) practices in two Hungarian information technology (IT) companies. The aim of the contribution is to provide an empirical in-depth analysis of how learning environments are being created and managed in knowledge-intensive small- and medium-sized enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on the analysis of two company case studies. Relying on semi-structured interviews, the following research question was formulated: Are knowledge-intensive organisations necessarily accompanied by an expansive learning environment and HR practices consistent with that?

Findings

The lessons learned from the two case studies indicate that there is no direct link between knowledge-intensive work and an expansive learning environment. The establishment of a specific type of learning environment is rather connected to the types of knowledge being used in the labour process and the management’s perspective on learning and development. It also implies that companies, instead of representing unified models, may combine various elements of an expansive and restrictive learning environment.

Originality/value

The originality of the findings of this study lies in the interpretative linking of learning environments and HR practices in medium-sized IT companies.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Mika J. Kortelainen, Janika Kyttä and Tarja Laakkonen

Laurea UAS, Lohja campus, in Finland, has a learning environment, Yrityslabra, for business management and administration students who want to complete their studies by…

Abstract

Laurea UAS, Lohja campus, in Finland, has a learning environment, Yrityslabra, for business management and administration students who want to complete their studies by doing real-life business assignments. This chapter depicts the elements of a physical learning environment that have contributed to improving learning results on Laurea Lohja campus. The campus was challenged with addressing long studying and graduation times, loss of students to other campuses, difficulties in employment after graduation and lack of cooperation between Laurea and organizations. To solve these problems, Laurea Lohja created a learning environment called Yrityslabra (Business Lab). As a result of the continuing development work and material gathered (interviews, memos from teacher development meetings, student evaluation discussions, and written evaluations), five distinctive elements for a learning environment were found. These elements are: informal physical environment, informal social environment, teacher’s role as a mentor, personal learning process, and project management process. As the result of the new learning environment, students on Laurea Lohja campus, for example, have shorter graduation times, and there are less drop-outs in the middle of the studies. Students also find work in their own field of interest and do so right after graduation. Also, there is increased interest for the graduating students to further their studies at the master’s level.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2017

Matt Bower

The ability for learners to interact online via their avatars in a 3-D simulation space means that virtual worlds afford a host of educational opportunities not offered by…

Abstract

The ability for learners to interact online via their avatars in a 3-D simulation space means that virtual worlds afford a host of educational opportunities not offered by other learning technology platforms, but their use also raises several pertinent issues that warrant consideration. This chapter reviews the educational use of virtual worlds from a design perspective. Virtual-world definitions are explored, along with their key educational characteristics. Different virtual-world environments are briefly contrasted, including Second Life, Active Worlds, Open Sim, and Minecraft. A wide variety of virtual-world uses in schools and universities are examined so as to understand their versatility. Key educational benefits of virtual worlds are distilled from the literature, such as the ability to facilitate 3-D simulations, role-plays, construction tasks, and immersive learning. Emergent issues surrounding the use of virtual worlds are also analyzed, including cognitive load, safety, and representational fidelity. One higher education and one school level vignette are provided in order to offer more detailed insight into the use of virtual worlds in practice. Recommendations for learning design and implementation are presented, based on the thematic analysis of contemporary virtual-worlds research.

Details

Design of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-183-4

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2022

Putra Endi Catyanadika and Jay Rajasekera

The absence of physical interactions in online learning environment brings psychological influences on learning participants in interacting and sharing knowledge with…

Abstract

Purpose

The absence of physical interactions in online learning environment brings psychological influences on learning participants in interacting and sharing knowledge with others, such as ignorance of other member’s presence and insecurity to share something in online environment. The purpose of this research was to examine the knowledge sharing behavior (KSB) by online learning community members in terms of their psychological safety (PS) and social presence (SP) perceptions. In addition, this research also identified the influence of PS to promote SP and the mediation impact of SP in the relationships between PS and KSB.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were gathered through self-administered questionnaire distributed to 133 online class members at a university in Indonesia where online learning has created a new learning experience. To represent key behavioral attributes, 12 items were used to represent PS, SP and KSB. The relationships among the variables were analyzed using the structural equation modelling method.

Findings

The result showed that PS positively influenced SP and KSB. SP also brought a positive impact on promoting KSB and fully mediated the relationship between PS and KSB.

Research limitations/implications

The result may not have fully captured the reflection of the influencing factors of KSB, as this research focused only on two psychological factors, namely, PS and SP. The research may be further enriched by including additional factors and expanding the data collection to include more online learning institutions.

Practical implications

The results implied the importance of PS and SP perception to promoting KSB in online learning environments. The results highlighted an important message to universities and schools to be more concerned on students’ feeling safe personally and students’ awareness of others’ presence to maximize knowledge sharing activities in online class environment.

Originality/value

This paper revealed the importance of PS and SP to promote KSB in the higher education online learning community. To the best of the researchers’ knowledge, this is the first study to link PS and SP to KSB and identify the importance of the mediation effect of SP on the relationship between PS and KSB specifically in higher education online learning environment.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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