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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

M. Duran Toksarı, Selçuk K. İşleyen, Ertan Güner and Ömer Faruk Baykoç

The purpose of this paper is to describe the introduction of simple assembly line balancing problems (SALBPs) under four joint combinations of two learning effects and two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the introduction of simple assembly line balancing problems (SALBPs) under four joint combinations of two learning effects and two deterioration effects.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, effects of learning and deterioration are considered simultaneously. By the effects of learning and deterioration, it is meant that the task time of a task is defined by increasing function of its execution start time and position in the sequence.

Findings

It was shown that polynomial solutions can be obtained for SALBP under four joint combinations of two learning effects and two deterioration effects. Furthermore, this paper also discusses the adaptations of the proposed models by using known ALB problem.

Originality/value

In this paper, SALBPs were introduced under four joint combinations of two learning effects and two deterioration effects. Position dependent learning effect and time dependent learning effect were considered for learning effect when linear deterioration effect and non‐linear deterioration effect were taken up.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2017

Matt Bower

This chapter provides an overview of two generally applicable frameworks relating to the use of technology-enhanced learning – ‘affordances’ and multimedia learning effects

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of two generally applicable frameworks relating to the use of technology-enhanced learning – ‘affordances’ and multimedia learning effects. First, the concept of ‘affordances’ as action potentials of technologies is identified as a way to think through technology-enhanced learning design possibilities, so as to help make technology selection decisions. Second, multimedia learning effects including the multimedia effect, the modality effect, the redundancy effect, the split-attention effect, and the personalization effect are presented as a scientific basis for understanding how to create cognitively effective learning experiences using text, images, sound, and video. Both affordances and multimedia learning effects are characterized as ongoing areas of research that are somewhat related, with the successful utilization of each depending on critical application by the designer.

Details

Design of Technology-Enhanced Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-183-4

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Martin Lackéus

Three different pedagogical approaches grounded in three different definitional foundations of entrepreneurship have been compared in relation to their effects on…

Abstract

Purpose

Three different pedagogical approaches grounded in three different definitional foundations of entrepreneurship have been compared in relation to their effects on students. They are: (1) “Idea and Artefact-Creation Pedagogy” (IACP), grounded in opportunity identification and creation, (2) “Value-Creation Pedagogy” (VaCP), grounded in value creation and (3) “Venture-Creation Pedagogy” (VeCP), grounded in organisation creation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected at 35 different sites where education was deemed to be entrepreneurial and experiential. A quantitative, smartphone app-based data collection method was used alongside a qualitative interview approach. 10,953 short-survey responses were received from 1,048 participants. Responses were used to inform respondent selection and discussion topics, in 291 student and teacher interviews. Comparative analysis was then conducted.

Findings

The three approaches resulted in very different outcomes, both in magnitude and in kind. VaCP had strong effects on entrepreneurial competencies, on student motivation and on knowledge and skills acquisition. VeCP had weaker effects on knowledge and skills acquisition. IACP had weak effects on all outcomes probed for. Differences were attributed to variation in prevalence of certain emotional learning events and to variation in purpose as perceived by students.

Research limitations/implications

VaCP could serve as an escape from the potential dilemma faced by many teachers in entrepreneurial education, of being caught between two limiting courses of action; a marginal VeCP approach and a fuzzy IACP one. This could prompt policymakers to reconsider established policies. However, further research in other contexts is needed, to corroborate the extent of differences between these three approaches.

Originality/value

Most impact studies in experiential entrepreneurial education focus only on organisation-creation-based education. This study contributes by investigating entrepreneurial education that is also grounded in two other definitional foundations. Allowance has been made for novel comparative conclusions.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Dongling Huang, Dmitri G. Markovitch and Yuanping Ying

This paper aims to identify the effects of social learning and network externalities by conditioning on product quality and early sales momentum. This approach is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the effects of social learning and network externalities by conditioning on product quality and early sales momentum. This approach is demonstrated using film sales data.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used econometric modeling approach.

Findings

It was found that both social learning and network externalities have significant and comparable impacts on film choice. We show that the relative effects of network externalities and social learning in the film market are robust to different momentum and quality definitions and to alternative estimation methods.

Originality/value

Scholars have long argued that social learning plays a key role in new product diffusion. In some product categories, consumer choice may also be influenced by network externalities, meaning that purchasing popular products may provide the consumer utility above and beyond that derived from product usage directly. We propose a novel identification approach to help quantify the relative magnitude of these two effects on new product sales.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Yu-Hsin Chen and Ching-Jui Keng

The purpose of this paper is to develop an extended Push-Pull-Mooring-Habit (PPMH) framework in order to better understand users’ intention of switching from offline to an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an extended Push-Pull-Mooring-Habit (PPMH) framework in order to better understand users’ intention of switching from offline to an online real-person English learning platform service.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on 301 valid responses collected from an online survey questionnaire, structural equation modeling was employed to examine the research model.

Findings

The causal model was validated using SmartPLS 3.0, and all study hypotheses were supported. The results show that push effects (learning convenience, service quality and perceived price), pull effects (e-learning motivation, perceived usefulness), mooring effects (learning engagement, switching cost and social presences) and habit effects (relationship inertia) all significantly influence users’ switching intentions from offline to an online real-person English learning platform.

Practical implications

The findings should help online English learning service providers and marketers to understand the intention of offline English learning users to switch to an online real-person English learning platform, and develop related theories, services and regulations.

Originality/value

The present study extends the prior research of an online real-person English learning platform by providing PPMH as the general framework and demonstrating its efficacy in explaining user switching intentions.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Ronald H. Heck and Philip Hallinger

The purpose of this paper is to test a multilevel, cross-classified model that seeks to illuminate the dynamic nature of relationships among leadership, teaching quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a multilevel, cross-classified model that seeks to illuminate the dynamic nature of relationships among leadership, teaching quality, and student learning in school improvement. The study's primary goal is to shed light on the paths through which leadership influences student learning. At the school level, the model examines the mediating effect of the school's instructional environment on leadership and student learning. At the classroom level, it examines how instructionally focussed leadership can moderate teacher effects on student learning. Then these multiple paths are examined in a single model that seeks to test and highlight the means by which leadership contributes to school improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study employed a multilevel longitudinal data set drawn from 60 primary schools in one state in the USA. Using a cross-classification approach to quantitative modeling, the research analyzes the complex cross-level interactions that characterize school-level and classroom level practices that contribute to school improvement and student learning.

Findings

The results illustrate the utility of specifying multilevel relationships when examining the “paths” that link school leadership to student learning. First, leadership effects on student learning were fully mediated by the quality of the school's instructional environment. Second, the findings indicated that the classroom-related paths examined in this study directly influenced the measures of student math achievement. Third, the research found that instructionally focussed school leadership moderated the effect of individual teachers on student learning. Fourth, the results suggest that school leaders can enhance student outcomes by creating conditions that lead to greater consistency in levels of effectiveness across teachers.

Practical implications

The study makes substantive contributions to the global knowledge base on school improvement by testing and elaborating on the “paths” that link school leadership and student learning. More specifically, the findings offer insights into strategic targets that instructional leaders can employ to enhance teacher effectiveness and school improvement. Thus, these results both support and extend findings from prior cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of leadership and school improvement.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has tested a conceptualization of leadership for learning in a single “cross-classified longitudinal model” capable of capturing interactions among leadership, classroom teaching processes and growth in student learning. The research illustrates one “state-of-the-art” methodological approach for analyzing longitudinal data collected at both the school and classroom levels when studying school improvement.

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Alfred Presbitero, Banjo Roxas and Doren Chadee

How do knowledge-intensive technology-based offshore information technology service providers (ITSPs) in developing countries sustain their innovation and remain…

Abstract

Purpose

How do knowledge-intensive technology-based offshore information technology service providers (ITSPs) in developing countries sustain their innovation and remain competitive? The purpose of this paper is to answer this question by drawing from the knowledge-based view of firm innovation to argue that organisational collectivism (COLL) plays a crucial role in influencing the effects of knowledge-based capabilities on innovation of ITSPs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study develops a model which shows that learning mediates the effects of knowledge sharing on innovation and that COLL moderates the effects of knowledge sharing on both innovation and learning. A moderated-mediation model is tested using structural equation modelling techniques and data (n=388) from a survey of ITSPs in the Philippines.

Findings

The results show that knowledge sharing capability is positively related to innovation and that organisational learning capability fully mediates the effects of knowledge sharing on innovation. Moreover, COLL is found to significantly and positively moderate the effects of knowledge sharing on both organisational learning and innovation. The results indicate that organisational learning serves as the mechanism that transforms knowledge into innovation, but this effect is contingent on COLL of ITSPs.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that ITSPs from developing countries can look beyond costly investments in research and development activities to invigorate their innovative capabilities. ITSPs can focus on the development of their intangible assets such as COLL to enhance the effects of knowledge-based resources on innovation for sustaining their competitiveness.

Originality/value

The moderated-mediation analytical approach to assessing the joint effects of knowledge sharing, organisational learning and collectivism on innovation is novel. The significant effects of the moderator suggest that the mediation mechanisms might differ depending on the levels of development of COLL in the organisation.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2018

Maxwell Okwudili Ede and Uwakwe Okereke Igbokwe

The purpose of this paper is fivefold: to identify the various results of previous empirical studies on the effect of mastery learning and students achievement in Nigeria…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is fivefold: to identify the various results of previous empirical studies on the effect of mastery learning and students achievement in Nigeria schools; determine the effect size for each of the studies examined; determine the mean effect size of the overall studies examined; find out the mean effect size of studies that examined the effect of gender on academic achievement in mastery learning strategy; and determine the mean effect size of studies that examined the effect of school locations on academic achievements using mastery learning strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted survey research design using the ex post facto procedure. This study being meta-analytical used already existing data (research results). The sample of research reports included both published and unpublished research reports on the effects of mastery learning on students’ academic achievements in Nigeria between 1980 and 2016. The study adopted a purposive sampling technique in selecting the sample. This was to ensure that studies: were centered on mastery learning and students’ academic achievements; were carried out in Nigeria; appeared in published and unpublished literature between 1980 and 2016; have the statistical values of the research results of each independent variable to be considered (e.g. t-test values, χ2 values and correlation values).

Findings

The study revealed that the mean effect size for all the studies was 0.536, indicating a positive mean effect size. The strategy, thus, has a significant effect on students’ achievements. School location, also, did not mediate in the use of the strategy.

Practical implications

Based on the findings of this study, the following recommendations were made: teachers should use this teaching strategy to enhance students’ achievements in difficult concepts in different subject areas. Since the result of this study has shown that the strategy has positive and large effect size, government and school proprietors should, with the collaboration of higher institutions concerned with teacher education, endeavor to organize seminars and workshops to serving teachers to enable them embrace effectively the principles and processes of implementing the strategy in the classroom. Since the result of this study has established the size of the effect of mastery learning strategy on the academic achievements, subsequent researchers should no longer direct their efforts in determining its effects on academic achievements but on the ways of improving the use of the strategy in teaching at all levels of education.

Originality/value

Available literature has shown that though most previous research findings revealed that mastery learning approach has an effect on academic achievements of students, no efforts have been made toward resolving the inconsistencies of those results by integrating them and establishing the extent of the effect of the strategy on academic achievements. This study, therefore, was designed to fill these gaps created by the non-existence of integrated studies on effects of mastery learning and academic achievements of students in Nigerian schools.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Kenneth Leithwood, Jingping Sun and Catherine McCullough

The purpose of this paper is to test the effects of nine district characteristics on student achievement, explored the conditions that mediated the effects of such…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the effects of nine district characteristics on student achievement, explored the conditions that mediated the effects of such characteristics and contributed to understandings about the role school-level leaders play in district efforts to improve achievement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were provided by the responses of 2,324 school and district leaders in 45 school districts to two surveys. Student achievement evidence was provided by multi-grade provincial measures of math and language achievement. The analysis of these data included calculation of descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analysis and regression mediation analysis.

Findings

Seven of nine district characteristics contributed significantly to student achievement and three conditions served as especially powerful mediators of such district effects. The same three conditions, as well as others, acted as significant mediators of school-level leader effects on achievement, as well.

Practical implications

District characteristics tested in the study provide a powerful framework for guiding the district improvement work of senior educational leaders. The organizational improvement efforts of both district and school leaders would be substantially enhanced by a better understanding of how to diagnose and improve the status of those conditions acting as significant mediators of the effects of both district and school leadership on student achievement.

Originality/value

This is one of a very few large-scale quantitative studies examining the extent to which characteristics frequently identified by district effectiveness research explain variation in student learning. It is also one of the very few studies identifying classroom, school and family variables that mediate district effects on such learning. The study also adds to a growing body of evidence about variables which mediate school leaders’ effects on such learning.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2006

Henrich R. Greve and Hayagreeva Rao

Learning theory explains how organizations change as a result of experience, and can be used to predict the competitive strength of individual organizations and…

Abstract

Learning theory explains how organizations change as a result of experience, and can be used to predict the competitive strength of individual organizations and competitive pressures in organizational populations. We review extant learning theoretical propositions on how competitive strength is affected by experienced competition, founding conditions, and observed failures of other organizations. In addition, we propose that niche changes are an important source of learning. We test these propositions on data from the Norwegian general insurance industry. We find that historical density increases failure rates, contrary to some earlier findings, and also that the effect of founding density supports the density delay rather than trial-by-fire hypothesis. We find that failures of others before and during the lifetime of the organization reduce failure rates, and niche changes reduce failure rates for joint-stock companies but not for mutual firms. Overall the findings suggest that organizations learn more cheaply from the failures of others than from their own experiences, and that the stresses of competition can overwhelm the learning effects of competition.

Details

Ecology and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-435-5

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