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Article

Anne Pässilä, Allan Owens and Maiju Pulkki

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise “Learning Jam” as a way of organising space, time and people through arts-based pedagogies in work-based learning. This form…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise “Learning Jam” as a way of organising space, time and people through arts-based pedagogies in work-based learning. This form of encounter originated in Finland to challenge functional silo mentality by prioritising polyphony. Through the use of a “kaleidoscopic pedagogy”, arts-based initiatives are used to collectively and subjectively reconsider practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design is grounded in one of a series of Learning Jams co-created by practitioners from the field of arts and arts-based consultancy and academics from the field of arts, arts education, innovation and management, learning and development. The focus was on exploring the value of each participants work-based learning practice through the lens of an Arts Value Matrix. Rancière’s critical theory was used to frame the exploration. The research questions asked; what are the ingredients of this creative, transformative learning space and in what ways can the polyphonic understandings that emerge in it impact on work-based learning?

Findings

Findings of this study centre around alternative ways of being in a learning setting where we do not defer to the conventional figures of authority, but collectively explore ways of organising, where the main idea is to lean on something-which-is-not-yet.

Research limitations/implications

A key research implication is that teaching in this context demands reflexive and dialogical capabilities for those who hold the role of organising and facilitating spaces for learning and transformation. The main limitation is in stopping short of fully articulating detailed aspects of these capabilities.

Originality/value

The originality and value of the practice of Learning Jam is that managers and artists explore the potential of operating as partners to develop new ways of working to realise organisational change and innovation.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article

Rafi Santo, Dixie Ching, Kylie Peppler and Christopher Hoadley

This article makes the case that the education community can learn from professional learning and innovation practices, collectively called “Working in the Open” (or…

Abstract

Purpose

This article makes the case that the education community can learn from professional learning and innovation practices, collectively called “Working in the Open” (or “Working Open”), that have roots in the free/open source software (F/OSS) movement. These practices focus on values of transparency, collaboration and sharing within communities of experimentation. This paper aims to argues that Working Open offers a compelling approach to fostering distributed educational professional networks that focus on co-constructing new projects and best practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Insights presented here are based on three sources: expert perspectives on open source work practices gleaned through interviews and blog posts, a qualitative case analysis of a collaborative project enacted by a group of informal learning organizations within the Hive NYC Learning Network, a community of over 70 youth-facing organizations in New York City, as well as an overview of that network’s participation structures, and, finally, knowledge-building activities and discussions held within the Hive NYC community about the topic in situ. From these sources, the authors derived general principles to guide open work approaches.

Findings

The authors identify five practices deemed as central to Working Open: public storytelling and context setting, enabling community contribution, rapid prototyping “in the wild”, public reflection and documentation and, lastly, creating remixable work products. The authors describe these practices, show how they are enacted in situ, outline ways that Hive NYC stewards promote a Working Open organizational ecosystem and conclude with recommendations for utilizing a Working Open approach.

Originality/value

Drawing from the F/OSS movement, this article builds on standard practices of professional learning communities to provide an approach that focuses on pushing forward innovation and changes in practice as opposed to solely sharing reflections or observing practices.

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Case study

Somnath Chakrabarti, Vijay Chadha and Rajiv Agarwal

This case provides insights about the importance of market research, market segmentation, distribution, product positioning, branding and advertising for a small but…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

This case provides insights about the importance of market research, market segmentation, distribution, product positioning, branding and advertising for a small but growing enterprise. This case provides insights into nuances about organizing and running a family-owned small business –Bhuira Jams has to objectively decide on its way-forward which can be a pure social enterprise or a pure commercial enterprise. This case provides understanding regarding the differences between the two models in terms of funding, accounting, legal, marketing and operational aspects.

Case overview/synopsis

In January 2017, Linnet Mushran had just won an award from the PHD Chamber of Commerce for her work in generating local employment for rural women in the village Bhuira, Himachal Pradesh, India. This award did make her feel happy. However, more than happiness, it got her thinking as to how would Bhuira Jams – the child born out of her passion for mountains and out of the desire to do something good survive in the coming years? Bhuira Jams was never designed like a formal business. Being a family run socially relevant business, Bhuira Jams faces the challenge of operational efficiency, along with an uphill task in marketing and distribution. Almost 35 per cent of its sales comes from Fabindia, which re-sells the Bhuira products under the Fabindia label. Thus, currently there is very little focus and expenditure in Bhuira on marketing and distribution. Another challenge faced by Bhuira Jams is driven by the health and lifestyle changes occurring in the Indian society. Consumer preferences are shifting towards low fat diets, and there is growing Americanization of the Indian society. This can be a double whammy for Bhuira’s main product line of preserves, which are high on calorie and are traditionally British.

Complexity academic level

Bhuira Jams conceptually is close to a family owned business due to the involvement of husband, daughter-in-law and son-in-law of Linnet. Thus, this case provides insights into nuances about organizing and running a family owned small business.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article

The manifesto of the Jam Section of the Food Manufacturers' Federation which was issued to the trade and to the public in October is a document which has been subjected to…

Abstract

The manifesto of the Jam Section of the Food Manufacturers' Federation which was issued to the trade and to the public in October is a document which has been subjected to much unfavourable criticism by various persons for various reasons. In our opinion it fully deserves the censure it has received. It need hardly be pointed out that jam of some kind is eaten by everybody. The annual production in this country is enormous. As a combined food and stimulant for young children jam is probably unrivalled; indeed, we cannot imagine a substitute for it. “Jam is a ready means of providing carbohydrates, and children require much carbohydrate in proportion to their size.” All this, however, assumes that jam is really what it claims to be, namely, a preparation of the fresh fruit that gives the name to the jam and sugar only. This, we take it, is the view of the ordinary man. If we turn to dictionaries we find this definition or something very like it in all the dictionaries that have been published during the last one hundred and seventy‐five years. The dictionaries of the 17th century seem not to define the word; its meaning, however, was well understood. Johnson, 1755, defines the word jam as “a conserve of fruit boiled with sugar and water”—by sugar of course meaning cane sugar. All the modern standard dictionaries speak to the same effect. Murray's Dictionary has “A conserve of fruit prepared by boiling it with sugar to a pulp.” The Encyclopædic Dictionary and Wright's Universal Pronouncing Dictionary have the same. The Century Dictionary says jam is “A conserve of fruit prepared by boiling them to a pulp in water with sugar.” Webster that it is “A thick preserve made of fruit boiled with sugar and water.” Funk and Wagnall's New Standard Dictionary, “A conserve of fruit prepared by thorough cooking and stewing with sugar, reducing it to a pulp.” It is unnecessary to give further quotations; they are all to the same effect and show what the purchaser has in his mind when he asks for a pot of jam at a shop.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available

Abstract

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Content available
Article

Niclas Sandström and Anne Nevgi

This paper aims to study a change process on a university campus from a pedagogical perspective. The aim of the process, as expressed by facilities management and faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study a change process on a university campus from a pedagogical perspective. The aim of the process, as expressed by facilities management and faculty leadership, was to create campus learning landscapes that promote social encounters and learning between students and researchers, as well as other embedded groups. The paper addresses how pedagogical needs are or should be integrated in the design process.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of this case study regarding change on campus consist of semi-structured interviews of information-rich key stakeholders identified using snowball sampling method. The interviews were analysed to find common themes and reference to pedagogical needs and expectations.

Findings

Campus usability and reliability are improved when pedagogy informs the design, and needs such as sense of belonging (human) and connectivity (digital) are fulfilled. User-centred design should be followed through during the whole campus change process, and there should be sufficient communications between user groups.

Research limitations/implications

The discussion is based on one case. However, the recommendations are solid and also reflected in other related research literature regarding campus change initiatives.

Practical implications

The paper states recommendations for including pedagogical needs in campus learning landscape change and underlines the role of real user-centred processes in reaching this goal.

Originality/value

The study introduces the concept of campus reliability and highlights a missing link from many campus change cases – pedagogy – which is suggested to be essential in informing campus designs that produce usable and reliable future-ready outcomes.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Ruth Helyer

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article

Minisha Gupta

Women empowerment is essential for the growth and development of the nation. This study aims to identify the role of non-government organisations (NGOs) in promoting women…

Abstract

Purpose

Women empowerment is essential for the growth and development of the nation. This study aims to identify the role of non-government organisations (NGOs) in promoting women empowerment through immediate livelihood facilities. Women are creative enough to start their own venture, but they are not able to explore the available opportunities because of male dominance, lack of education and proper government support. Thus, NGOs play a major role in training and empowering women to attain immediate livelihood.

Design/methodology/approach

The role of NGOs in empowering women has been explored using the case study method. A total of five case studies of women who attained training and started their own venture have been developed using in-depth interviews.

Findings

Women empowerment occurs through venture creation and entrepreneurship, which can be attained with proper training and information. Motivation and effective leadership help women in gaining confidence, and they aim to achieve their goals. Proper information about government policies, networking with customers, relationship with self-help groups (SHGs) and NGOs also help them in attaining empowerment.

Practical implications

This study indicates to the government and researchers that, instead of initiating new policies, it is important to focus on the existing policies and improve them. NGOs or SHGs must focus on providing immediate livelihood through venture creation or entrepreneurial activities.

Social implications

Women need to be more socialised and develop a habit of partnership with their friends and neighbours to extend their ventures (Dixit et al., 2020). To meet the demand of sustainable and green environment, women must be trained about green manufacturing and to prepare products which are environmentally friendly and sustainable (Agarwal et al., 2020). Instead of initiating new policies, government must review their existing policies and provide equal opportunities to increase female workforce.

Originality/value

This study focusses on the role of NGOs in empowering women by focussing on their immediate livelihood through venture creation or entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article

We have received a communication from Mr. A. H. Mitchell Muter, F.I.C., Public Analyst for Lambeth, with reference to the contamination of cheese as the result of it being…

Abstract

We have received a communication from Mr. A. H. Mitchell Muter, F.I.C., Public Analyst for Lambeth, with reference to the contamination of cheese as the result of it being wrapped in tinfoil.—Mr. Muter observes that the following facts are those upon which he based his remarks, re the potential danger to health arising from contamination by tin in cheese wrapped in this metal, contained in his report for the fourth quarter of 1929 to one of the Local Authorities for which he acts :—On 4th November, 1929, a Food Inspector to the Authority in question submitted an informal sample of wrapped cheese as the result of a complaint having been received from a ratepayer to the effect that he had been taken ill after partaking of it.—Mr. Muter's analysis showed it to contain 5·68 grains of tin per lb., and he therefore reported that he was of opinion that the ratepayer was fully justified in bringing the matter to the notice of the Inspector.—On 15th November a formal sample of wrapped cheese was submitted, which he found contained 6·89 grs. tin per lb., and he issued a report to this effect. As the result of this report he received on the 25th November five informal samples of various brands, all of which were found to contain tin varying from 0·28 to 6·34 grs. per lb., and a further three informal samples received on the 3rd December contained tin in quantities from 1·37 to 11·03 grs. per lb. On the 12th December a formal sample was submitted which contained as much as 14·8 grs. tin per lb.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Denis Rice

Denis Rice, of the Department of Adult Education, University of Leicester, discusses the role of the seminar in university teaching.

Abstract

Denis Rice, of the Department of Adult Education, University of Leicester, discusses the role of the seminar in university teaching.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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