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Article

Leanne Owen

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that a deliberate effort to link course content to students’ personal or professional goals results in increased student…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that a deliberate effort to link course content to students’ personal or professional goals results in increased student perceptions of relevance.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-report data were collected using questionnaires that were administered to students in a research methods course over a period of three semesters. Results were compared in order to determine whether the introduction of guest speakers, hands-on activities, and pertinent video clips fostered greater perceptions of relevance in specific learning units.

Findings

Although there was some variation, data revealed that students reported the greatest increases in their perceptions of specific course content as relevant if that content was explicitly and clearly linked to a potentially practical professional application.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was inconsistent and self-report studies may be viewed as unreliable. The instrument used may benefit from the inclusion of concrete behavioral frequency statements.

Practical implications

If faculty members can make explicit connections and persuade students’ perceptions of the relevance of course content, students may develop greater motivation to learn, a deeper understanding of the material, and a propensity for long-term transfer.

Originality/value

Although a number of studies have investigated the causal link between perceived relevance of course content and the attainment of academic or professional goals, none have tracked changes in student perceptions of relevance as a direct result of deliberate faculty efforts to make the relevance of course content explicitly clear for students.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article

Meena Chavan and Leanne Carter

The purpose of this paper is to explore the expectations and reality perspectives accrued in a preliminary management course and understand if they impart and embed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the expectations and reality perspectives accrued in a preliminary management course and understand if they impart and embed real-world skills and develop work readiness.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data collected for the research were qualitative. A total of six focus groups were conducted with a total of 52 students enrolled at a large metropolitan university in Australia. NViVO was used to code and analyse the data.

Findings

The study found that at the commencement of university studies, the expectations were simple like, making new friends, getting around the campus and settling well into the university culture, which over time extended to getting a part-time job, securing internships, memberships of associations, desire to participate in exchange programs and get work-ready by the close of the first year. The research outcomes show that those who held a part-time job while studying demonstrated a better understanding of the preliminary management subject matter taught in class and obtained better grades. Primarily, the preliminary management course did not specifically impart work-ready skills and it would be fitting to embed employability skills in the management curriculum from the commencement of their programs in the first year.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative research is used to comprehend a research problem from the outlook perspectives of the local population it involves. The limitations of this methodology includes no objectively verifiable result, adept interviewing skills for interviewers, slow and time consuming during interviewing process and intensive category process also as qualitative inquiry is normally open-ended, the participants have more control over the content of the data collected.

Practical implications

The lack of skill mismatch and graduates who are not work-ready incurs significant economic and social costs. A number of policy implications emerge due to university-labour market links and skills mismatches and the impact on students and the labour market. The rise in unemployment and the skills mismatch seen after the economic crisis requires immediate attention. Job creation is crucial but so is the need to develop graduate with appropriate matching skills and qualities to do the job. Mandatory internships, apprenticeships and on-the-job training for university students would help. Governments can provide financial incentives and subsidies to organisations providing the above services and working cooperatively with the universities to get students work-ready. Universities must raise the educational requirements over time as jobs become more complex. Universities can build communities of practice with the assistance of this scheme to enable students to interact with the industry professionals. An additional year of vocational training could be recommended for the graduating students. This would help the young graduates to get work-related skills. Wheelahan et al. (2015) state that building better links between education and work can help provide a more rational approach to vocational development. They propose the use of vocational streams and productive capabilities in the education system and labour market to achieve this.

Social implications

This requires a combined effort from all stakeholders. A systematic approach needs to be adopted. First, the gap between the knowledge provided by the universities and the skills required by the employers need to be reduced. Second, the employers and the universities should keep a watch on the labour market and develop strategies to meet the dynamic requirements of the labour market collaboratively. Third, career guidance will help inform students make a career choice to match the labour market opportunities. This should be a part of the policy agenda for responding to the lack of work-ready graduates in the labour market.

Originality/value

Learning and teaching activities must include industry interface and engagement right from the first year at university. The main findings from this research indicated the need for better understanding of first-year students’ expectations. The two significant student expectations that emerged were “need for collaborations” and “industry interface”.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article

Katherine Leanne Christ, Roger Burritt and Mohsen Varsei

Environmental Management Accounting (EMA) information has become synonymous with win-win decision settings, but this paper aims to consider how EMA support can be extended…

Abstract

Purpose

Environmental Management Accounting (EMA) information has become synonymous with win-win decision settings, but this paper aims to consider how EMA support can be extended to company managers who face the dynamics of win-wins and trade-offs.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on extant literature, the paper suggests an important extension of the use of EMA in support of management decision-making. The need for extended consideration and use of EMA to help overcome trade-offs is illustrated using the case of a wine bottling plant location decision by an Australian company in a global supply chain transporting wine from Australia to North America and Europe.

Findings

Results confirm the need to add to the broader use of EMA to assist managers attempting to solve real world trade-off problems between economic performance, carbon equivalent emissions reduction and water risk reduction.

Research limitations/implications

Generalisation of the single wine company case illustration to other companies and similar industry settings remains to be investigated.

Practical implications

Trade-offs are considered between economic benefit and two environmental performance matters of concern to the company, carbon equivalent emissions reduction and water risk reduction.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the notion of extending the use of EMA as a pragmatic way for managers to assess trade-off situations with environmental alternatives where no optimal solution is available. Value is added through the real case study of an Australian wine company.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Content available
Article

Emilio Boulianne, Leanne S. Keddie and Maxence Postaire

This study seeks to identify how professional accountants in France are educated in sustainability; we examine the French accounting programs in regard to sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to identify how professional accountants in France are educated in sustainability; we examine the French accounting programs in regard to sustainability accounting education recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

We analyze a variety of documents to ascertain what comprises the typical accounting education program in France. Additionally, we conduct five interviews of various stakeholders to understand the importance of sustainability accounting and education in the French context.

Findings

We note an interesting paradox in the French context: while the government requires the reporting and auditing of corporate sustainability information, we find that sustainability is not greatly present in the government-funded French accounting education program. We determine that the government’s power in setting the education agenda combined with its budget restrictions and ability to defer responsibility to other parties has resulted in this paradox in the French setting.

Practical implications

This research draws attention to the consequences of society ignoring sustainability education for professional accountants.

Social implications

This paper contributes to the discussion on how to educate responsible professional accountants and the implications for the planet if accountants are not trained in sustainability.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the important domain of sustainability accounting education. We also explore additional implications for the accounting profession and the general public.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Book part

Emilio Boulianne and S. Leanne Keddie

This study explores how Canadian CPAs (Chartered Professional Accountants) are trained in sustainability. The main research questions are: What place should sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores how Canadian CPAs (Chartered Professional Accountants) are trained in sustainability. The main research questions are: What place should sustainability take in the accounting program? What place does sustainability occupy in the CPA accounting program? And, over time, has sustainability gained or lost ground within the Canadian professional accounting education program?

Methodology/approach

Content analysis and interviews.

Findings

We find that sustainability is not a key component of the CPA education program since its sustainability content has shrunk over the years. We believe that the groupthink phenomenon may have influenced the selection of CPA Competency Map participants (whose backgrounds reveal a lack of sustainability expertise) as well as the participants’ discussions. Additionally, a lack of consideration for society as a key stakeholder may have also influenced the shortage of sustainability content. Finally, power dynamics might have contributed to the financial accounting and reporting competencies dominating the new map.

Research limitations

We did not have access to the live meetings when the Map was created, although we conducted interviews with representatives involved in the process. This research is bound by a confidentiality agreement that limits us from providing sensitive details. However, we do not consider that these limitations undermine our contribution or reduce the relevance of our research.

Originality/value

Our research contributes to the under-researched domain of sustainability education and to understanding how groupthink, stakeholder theory and power dynamics may have contributed to the dearth of sustainability coverage in the new Canadian CPA program.

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Natalie Booth

Family life can be seriously disrupted when a mother is imprisoned. The separation changes and often reduces the type, frequency and quality of contact that can be…

Abstract

Family life can be seriously disrupted when a mother is imprisoned. The separation changes and often reduces the type, frequency and quality of contact that can be achieved between family members, and especially for children when their mothers were their primary carers and living with them before her imprisonment. In England and Wales, prisoners are permitted contact with children and families through prison visits, telephone contact and letter-writing through the post, and in some prisons via email. Despite the recent policy interest in supporting prisoners' family ties, research has highlighted the challenges that families and prisoners face using these communicative mechanisms. Building on this, the chapter contributes new knowledge by shifting the lens to explore how family members construct and adjust their practices to promote mother–child contact during maternal imprisonment.

The empirical study draws on semistructured interviews with mothers in prison and family members (caregivers) to children of female prisoners. Guided by a ‘family practices’ theoretical framework (Morgan, 2011), the findings show innovative adjustments, a willingness to make sacrifices and alternative routes to improve contact utilised by mothers and caregivers to prioritise mother–child contact. We see the strength, resilience and autonomy shown by family members to promote their relationships in spite of communicative barriers. There are important lessons to be learned from the families' lived experience for policy and practice, which, without due and genuine consideration, might further hinder opportunities for mother–child contact during maternal imprisonment.

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Article

Katherine Leanne Christ and Roger Leonard Burritt

Water is critical to all life on Earth and a crucial business resource which evidence suggests is often mismanaged. Corporate water accounting is an emerging practice…

Abstract

Purpose

Water is critical to all life on Earth and a crucial business resource which evidence suggests is often mismanaged. Corporate water accounting is an emerging practice designed to help corporations address water issues. Indirect water management in supply chains is important, but hitherto little consideration has been given to supply chain water accounting. This paper aims to synthesise available literature and infer how future research can further knowledge and take-up in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative literature review is used to synthesise the current state of knowledge and the prospects for academic research looking to further practice in supply chain water accounting.

Findings

Literature reveals two contrasting issues in need of further research, first, between normative and practical approaches to supply chain water accounting and, second, the focus on external reporting versus management.

Research limitations/implications

One main limitation is recognised. Technical aspects of supply chain water accounting tools, for example, water footprints and material flow cost accounting are not considered as focus is on the take-up of corporate supply chain water accounting in practice.

Practical implications

This study sets out an agenda for the future of supply chain water accounting which can be used to guide research and stimulate extension in practice and take-up of important indirect considerations in corporate water accounting in supply chains.

Originality/value

The integrative literature review leads to the identification of future research opportunities and a set of research questions relating to useful information, links with internal decision-making and external collaboration, application in companies of different sizes and to furthering the take-up of corporate water accounting practice in the increasingly important collaborative supply chain relationships which span the globe.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article

Arnau Gifreu-Castells

The constant updating and unstoppable advance of technologies, mixing of platforms, programs and codes and the new trends in funding, among other factors, have led us to a…

Abstract

Purpose

The constant updating and unstoppable advance of technologies, mixing of platforms, programs and codes and the new trends in funding, among other factors, have led us to a present-future full of interactive, collaborative, participatory and co-creative digital artefacts and works. Games, experimental projects, short films and interactive video clips, in relation to fictional and non-fictional narrative, like documentary and journalism mainly, generate a complex body of works that depend on a series of compatibilities between technologies and languages to work properly and keep up with the times. The main purpose of this article is to analyse how the expression forms of interactive nonfiction narrative can be exhibited and preserved, looking at four main genres: documentary, journalism, museums and education.

Design/methodology/approach

At the methodological level, a study of analogue and digital forms in the proposed areas was performed, and a series of projects as case studies were analysed. In addition, a series of initiatives and institutions developing preservation methods are listed and ten effective strategies have been proposed to preserve interactive and transmedia nonfiction works.

Findings

The results make it possible to propose new ways of exhibiting and preserving valuable digital non-fiction works that need to be catalogued and safeguarded for the future.

Originality/value

For non-digital artistic forms of expression, copies were the main way of ensuring their preservation, but how does this process work for digital art forms? This area is a virgin field that urgently needs to be studied to determine and generate structures for preserving these types of works.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Article

Robyn Creagh, Sarah McGann, Marian Tye, Jonine Jancey and Courtney Babb

The purpose of this paper is to report on research investigating the relationship between physical activity and workplace design. In particular, the paper explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on research investigating the relationship between physical activity and workplace design. In particular, the paper explores the social–ecological context of a new workplace building. This paper seeks to understand why better physical activity outcomes for the staff were not observed in the new building despite influence from a staff wellness committee during design; achieving success against existing best-practice indicators; and staff reporting increased feelings of wellness, energy and satisfaction with the new building.

Design/methodology/approach

Three design aspects are taken as a focus from within an opportunistic pre-/post-physical activity study of an organisation as they move from a building they occupied for 30 years into a new purpose-designed building. This study was conducted through mixed methods, incorporating ethnographic, architectural and quantitative means.

Findings

The social, spatial and personal context is important for understanding participant workplace-based physical activity. Despite the health and well-being goals and 5 Star Green Star outcomes of the new building, participants were sedentary for a substantive part of their workday in both buildings.

Practical implications

A well-designed environment can support staff feeling healthier, but the 5 Star Green Star rating does not implicitly ensure a healthier, activity-promoting environment. Facilities managers and designers can act to provide physically active paths as the most straightforward circulation option in workplaces.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the opportunity to conduct a pre-/post-study of physical activity where the organisation, workforce and type of work are constant and where the variable is the building design, spatial configuration and location. The methods used in this study draw from both health promotion and architectural research practices.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article

Ann Dadich, Penny Abbott and Hassan Hosseinzadeh

Evidence-based practice is pivotal to effective patient care. However, its translation into practice remains limited. Given the central role of primary care in many…

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence-based practice is pivotal to effective patient care. However, its translation into practice remains limited. Given the central role of primary care in many healthcare systems, it is important to identify strategies that bolster clinician-capacity to promote evidence-based care. The purpose of this paper is to identify strategies to increase Practice Nurse capacity to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare within general practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 217 Practice Nurses in an Australian state and ten respondent-interviews regarding two resources to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare – namely, a clinical aide and online training.

Findings

The perceived impact of both resources was determined by views on relevance and design – particularly for the clinical aide. Resource-use was influenced by role and responsibilities within the workplace, accessibility, and support from patients and colleagues.

Research limitations/implications

This is the first Australian study to reveal strategies to promote evidence-based sexual healthcare among Practice Nurses. The findings provide a platform for future research on knowledge translation processes, particularly among clinicians who might be disengaged from sexual healthcare.

Practical implications

Given the benefits of evidence-based practices, it is important that managers recognize their role, and the role of their services, in promoting these. Without explicit support for evidence-based care and recognition of the Practice Nurse role in such care, knowledge translation is likely to be limited.

Originality/value

Knowledge translation among Practice Nurses can be facilitated by: resources-deemed informative, relevant, and user-friendly, as well as support from patients, colleagues, and their workplace.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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