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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Yuanzhu Zhan, Kim Hua Tan, Leanne Chung, Lujie Chen and Xinjie Xing

The main purpose of this paper is to investigate how social media can provide important platforms to facilitate organisational learning and innovation in new product…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to investigate how social media can provide important platforms to facilitate organisational learning and innovation in new product development (NPD) process.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multiple case-study approach, this study assesses qualitative data collected via 56 interviews from 13 world-leading Chinese companies in the high-technology industry.

Findings

The study identified three distinct types of organisational learning mechanisms for firms to extract potential innovation inherent in social media. It further determined various organisational enablers that facilitate the connections between these mechanisms and NPD performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the emerging literature on digital product development and organisational learning. The cases were conducted in the Chinese context, hence, the results may not be fully generalisable to other organisations, industries and countries without appropriate re-contextualisation.

Practical implications

The empirical evidence showcases the various mechanisms adopted by managers in different NPD phases. It identifies several technological and organisational adaptations that managers can apply to smartly scale their social presence and facilitate NPD.

Originality/value

Despite the exponential growth of social media use in identifying and interacting with external stakeholders, managerial practice and academic research have paid little attention to how social media can be leveraged for NPD. The value of this research comes from applying a qualitative method to gain in-depth insights into the mechanisms for leveraging social media to facilitate innovation in NPD.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Yuanzhu Zhan, Kim Hua Tan, Guojun Ji, Leanne Chung and Minglang Tseng

The purpose of this paper is to suggest how firms could use big data to facilitate product innovation processes, by shortening the time to market, improving customers 

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest how firms could use big data to facilitate product innovation processes, by shortening the time to market, improving customers’ product adoption and reducing costs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a two-step approach. First, this research identifies four potential key success factors for organisations to integrate big data in accelerating their product innovation processes. The proposed factors are further examined and developed by conducting interviews with different organisation experts and academic researchers. Then a framework is developed based on the interview outputs. The framework sets out the key success factors involved in leveraging big data to reduce lead times and costs in product innovation processes.

Findings

The three determined key success factors are: accelerated innovation process; customer connection; and an ecosystem of innovation. The authors believe that the developed framework based on big data represents a paradigm shift. It can help firms to make new product development dramatically faster and less costly.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed accelerated innovation processes demand a shift in traditional organisational culture and practices. It is, though, meaningful only for products and services with short life cycles. Moreover, the framework has not yet been widely tested.

Practical implications

This paper points to the vital role of big data in helping firms to accelerate product innovation processes. First of all, it allows organisations to launch new products to market as quickly as possible. Second, it helps organisations to determine the weaknesses of the product earlier in the development cycle. Third, it allows functionalities to be added to a product that customers are willing to pay a premium for, while eliminating features they do not want. Last, but not least, it identifies and then prioritises customer needs for specific markets.

Originality/value

The research shows that firms could harvest external knowledge and import ideas across organisational boundaries. An accelerated innovation process based on big data is characterised by a multidimensional process involving intelligence efforts, relentless data collection and flexible working relationships with team members.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Marlon Meier, Kim Hua Tan, Ming K. Lim and Leanne Chung

Fast-changing customer demands and rising requirements in product performance constantly challenge sports equipment manufacturers to come up with new and improved products…

Abstract

Purpose

Fast-changing customer demands and rising requirements in product performance constantly challenge sports equipment manufacturers to come up with new and improved products to stay competitive. Additive manufacturing (AM), also referred to as 3D printing, can enhance the development of new products by providing an efficient approach of rapid prototyping. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the current adoption of AM technologies in the innovation process of the sports industry, i.e. level of awareness; how it is implemented; and it impact on the innovation process.

Design/methodology/approach

This work followed a qualitative research approach. After conducting a research of the current literature, this paper presents findings that include case studies from different companies, as well as a semi-structured interview with an outdoor sports equipment manufacturer. Companies from all over the world and of different sizes from under 100 employees to over 70,000 employees were considered in this research.

Findings

Literature research shows that AM brings many possibilities to enhance the innovation process, and case studies indicated several obstacles that hinder the technology from fully unfolding. AM is still at the early stage of entering the sports equipment industry and its potential benefits have not been fully exploited yet. The findings generated from the research of real-life practices show that AM provides several benefits when it comes to the innovation process, such as a faster development process, an optimised output, as well as the possibility to create new designs. However, companies are not yet able to enhance the innovation process in a way that leads to new products and new markets with AM. Limitations, including a small range of process able material and an inefficient mass production, still restrain the technology and lead to unused capability. Nevertheless, future prospects indicate the growing importance of AM in the innovation process and show that its advancement paves the way to new and innovative products.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations exist in the qualitative approach of this study, which does not include the quantitative verification of the results.

Originality/value

Very few studies have been conducted to investigate how firms can harvest AM to increase their innovation capabilities. How firms can use AM to shorten product development time is an emerging topic in business and operations but has not been studied widely. This paper aims to address this gap.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Content available

Abstract

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Leanne Bowler

This chapter examines adolescent metacognitive knowledge in a fresh light and answers some methodological questions related to the investigation of the deepest layers of…

Abstract

This chapter examines adolescent metacognitive knowledge in a fresh light and answers some methodological questions related to the investigation of the deepest layers of thinking during the information search. It does so by presenting a study that used an ethnographic approach to investigate the metacognitive knowledge of 10 adolescents, aged 16 to 18, over the course of four months, and in a variety of settings –– home, school, public libraries –– as they searched for, collected, and then used information for a school project. The study was framed by Flavel's model of metacognition (1977) and Kuhlthau's information search process (ISP) model, a six-stage, multidimensional model of information problem solving (1991, 2004). The chapter begins with a discussion about the ISP, metacognitive knowledge, and its potential for information seeking. The chapter then presents the findings of the study as a set of gaps and strengths of adolescent metacognitive knowledge, and concludes with commentary about the challenges and rewards related to conducting research with young people and suggestions for future areas of research.

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Leanne Bowler, Wan‐Yin Hong and Daqing He

The purpose of this study was to analyse the hyperlinks leading to six teen health websites in order to assess the visibility of teen health web portals as well as to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to analyse the hyperlinks leading to six teen health websites in order to assess the visibility of teen health web portals as well as to discover which websites refer teens to reliable health information.

Design/methodology/approach

An environmental scan of the web was conducted to find sample health websites for teens. Inlink data was gathered using Google Webmaster Tools, and the inlink sources were classified by the type of creator.

Findings

The teen health websites in this study had a low level of visibility on the web compared to general health web portals (such as Medline Plus, for example) and a weak level of referrals from health‐related groups compared to other organisations such as schools and public libraries. Many non‐healthcare related websites are linking to teen health information, demonstrating that teens' health information needs are being met by sources that lack expertise in health care.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the small sample of six websites, generalisations beyond the context of the study are difficult to infer. The Google Webmaster inlink tool does not guarantee 100 per cent coverage and some inlinks may not have been captured by the tool, although this number is most likely minimal. The results of this study present a snapshot rather than an all‐inclusive view of the visibility of teen health websites and offer a starting point for further investigation.

Practical implications

The weak network of inlinks leading from reliable health care providers is a lost opportunity for health care professionals to reach young people.

Social implications

Due to the weak network of inlinks from reliable health information sources, teens may not be accessing accurate and reliable health information. This could have a potential cost in terms of health outcomes.

Originality/value

The study investigates health information for teens, a population that increasingly uses the web as a source for health information. The authors used an approach that has not been used before in the study of teens and health information on the web.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Leanne C. McGrath and Richard A. Heiens

When managed poorly, e‐business initiatives may actually transform once promising opportunities into dangerous threats. In this article, the authors outline the…

Abstract

When managed poorly, e‐business initiatives may actually transform once promising opportunities into dangerous threats. In this article, the authors outline the environmental threats posed by the Internet and e‐business practices and present a series of propositions on the relationship between managerial perceptions of e‐business’s impact on industry structure and the prevalence of a formal e‐business strategy.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 18 May 2016

Mina Saghian and Meghan Murray

In 2013, Under Armour had $2.3 billion in sales yet only $500 million came from its women’s apparel, and the company was ready to expand into the female market segment…

Abstract

In 2013, Under Armour had $2.3 billion in sales yet only $500 million came from its women’s apparel, and the company was ready to expand into the female market segment. The “I Will What I Want” global women’s marketing campaign was the largest Under Armour had ever run. Founder Keven Plank and his team launched the campaign on a multichannel platform, with social media at its core. The campaign’s success surpassed what Plank had imagined, and he is left wondering where to take Under Armour’s advertising and marketing next. This case has been used successfully in a marketing course and would be suited for any class with a focus on interactive media, technology, and multichannel marketing.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Article
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Pinghao Ye, Liqiong Liu and Joseph Tan

Innovation, in most enterprises, originates from employees. In this study, how organizational climate, creative leadership ability and emotional reaction to imposed change…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation, in most enterprises, originates from employees. In this study, how organizational climate, creative leadership ability and emotional reaction to imposed change impact on innovative behaviour of employees vis-Ă -vis knowledge sharing within the workplace is explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a social cognitive perspective, a model is constructed to explain factors influencing the innovation behaviour of employees along two key aspects, that is, organizational climate (innovation vs risk-taking climate) and creative leadership ability (leadership skills, vision incentive) vis-Ă -vis other moderating factors. A survey questionnaire, administered to a total of 311 manufacturing employees in China, was used to verify the proposed research model via Smart PLS.

Findings

Results unveil several key factors impacting positively on creative leadership in organizations. Specifically, creative leadership ability, emotional reaction to imposed change, innovation climate and knowledge sharing are found to impact positively on innovation behaviour while supportive versus risk-taking climate as well as emotional reaction are found to impact positively on innovation climate. Additionally, knowledge sharing is found to regulate the relationship between innovation climate and innovation behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

While offering insights into the antecedent factors of innovation behaviour, the study extends research on the intermediary role of innovation climate and employees' innovation behaviour. Additionally, it improves one's understanding on the moderating role between knowledge sharing and innovation behaviour.

Practical implications

The study findings will assist enterprises in diagnosing the implementation environment of innovation strategy, thereby providing a reference for training enterprise leadership while improving the employees' understanding of innovation and reform in the workplace.

Originality/value

The study contributes both theoretical and managerial thinking on the extent in which organizational climate and creative leadership ability may and/or should be evolved appropriately to support, encourage and nurture employees' innovation behaviour in the workplace.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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