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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Guangrong Dai, King Yii Tang and Kenneth P. De Meuse

This paper aims to test the pipeline model of leadership development by investigating how the competency profile change across position levels.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test the pipeline model of leadership development by investigating how the competency profile change across position levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The skill and importance ratings in leadership competencies were compared between four position levels. The data were from an archive 360 degree feedback (n=770). Six SMEs were also employed to rate the importance of the competencies.

Findings

The study found that the difference between two positions in terms of the relative importance of the competencies increases as the organizational hierarchical distance between the two positions increases. Comparing the skill ratings yielded similar results. Further, the correlation between the skill and importance ratings for the same position level was higher than correlations of the two types of ratings for different position levels.

Research limitations/implications

The study discusses the implications of the research findings in the context of leadership development and succession management.

Practical implications

One of the essential tasks in a succession system is to clearly define critical leadership skills at different levels of management. By defining the leadership pipeline, companies will be able to get their best people the right developmental experiences to help them transition from one position level to another.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical support for the pipeline model of leadership skill requirement across the organizational hierarchy.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Dean Fink

A crucial aspect of a school's capacity to promote and sustain change and improvement in student learning is the depth, breadth and endurance of both its formal and…

Abstract

Purpose

A crucial aspect of a school's capacity to promote and sustain change and improvement in student learning is the depth, breadth and endurance of both its formal and informal leadership. Shortages of willing leaders, however, have forced governments around the world to expend a considerable amount of time, effort, and money to fill up the leadershippipeline” with qualified candidates for leadership positions. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the examples of school districts in Ontario, Canada, in England and in the eastern United States to look beyond the common practice of merely filling up “pipelines” with credentialed leaders to an examination of the development of leadership “pools” and “reservoirs” of leadership capacity through distributed forms of leadership.

Findings

It is found that there has been a subtle but important shift in thinking over the past few years. Where once money spent on leadership recruitment and development was considered a cost, it is now viewed as an investment and as a result some school authorities have shifted focus from “replacement planning” in which specific people are identified to fill certain jobs, to a “succession management” approach which involves building an organization's leadership capacity by identifying, recruiting, and developing a “pool” of high‐potential individuals for both current and future roles.

Originality/value

The paper shows that developing this pool depends in large measure on the “reservoir” of leadership capacity in an organization and perhaps most importantly, the willingness of potential leaders to come forward.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Kevin S. Groves

Organizations often fail to utilize managerial personnel effectively for leadership development and succession planning systems, and many execute these critical practices…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations often fail to utilize managerial personnel effectively for leadership development and succession planning systems, and many execute these critical practices through separate human resource functions that shift the responsibility for leadership development away from line managers. The purpose of this article is to present a best practices model for optimal development of the leadership pipeline and a series of practical recommendations for organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A group of 30 CEOs and human resource executives across 15 best practice organizations were asked via semi‐structured interviews to describe the content and delivery of their respective organizations' leadership development and succession planning practices.

Findings

Analysis of interview data indicated that best practice organizations effectively integrate leadership development and succession planning systems by fully utilizing managerial personnel in developing the organization's mentor network, identifying and codifying high potential employees, developing high potentials via project‐based learning experiences and manager‐facilitated workshops, establishing a flexible and fluid succession planning process, creating organization‐wide forums for exposing high potential employees to multiple stakeholders, and establishing a supportive organizational culture.

Research limitations/implications

The interview data are drawn from a relatively small number of executives and from a single industry, which may limit the overall utility of the findings.

Originality/value

This study offers needed empirical support for the value of integrating leadership development and succession planning practices through utilization of managerial personnel. Management development practitioners will benefit from assessing their respective organizations' current practices vis‐à‐vis those discussed here, while scholars may utilize the best practices model for generating further research on the role of managerial personnel in talent management systems.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Suzanne Ross

In this chapter Suzanne Ross draws on her experience previously as a talent manager and now as a leadership consultant, Executive Coach and Senior Lecturer in Executive…

Abstract

In this chapter Suzanne Ross draws on her experience previously as a talent manager and now as a leadership consultant, Executive Coach and Senior Lecturer in Executive Education, and applies her research on leadership derailment to talent management. As organizations continue to invest in leadership development, research suggests up to 50 per cent of leaders derail or fail in their role. The derailment literature is, to-date, disconnected from TM although central to the definition of leadership derailment is that derailed leaders were previously successful and had potential. The chapter explores the concept of derailment, how it is defined, its scale and scope and some of the causes of derailment including a lack of organizational support during leadership transitions. The notion of the ‘accidental manager’ is used to provide an example of where literature on TM and derailment converge as a key derailer characteristic is having an overly functional orientation. This maps to the accidental manager concept and to the challenges that TM practitioners face in developing career pathways for expert/specialists beyond managerial roles. Suzanne argues that talent identification should take more account of derailment characteristics and suggests there may be gender differences in how these are perceived and in the consequences that arise when they are present. The chapter contributes to a greater understanding of how the concept of derailment can be integrated within talent management research and practice.

Details

Managing Talent: A Critical Appreciation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-094-3

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Sarah Churchman and Cleo Thompson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a case study of the development and implementation of a diversity strategy to recruit, retain and promote more women to partnership…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a case study of the development and implementation of a diversity strategy to recruit, retain and promote more women to partnership positions at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, a global network of professional services firms. At PricewaterhouseCoopers gender diversity is a business issue, not a gender issue. The business case for gender diversity is undeniable and numerous studies underline the impact of women on the profitability of the organization. With women now representing half the workforce, the strategy now focuses on providing an environment that allows women to progress and to be successful in positions of leadership. This paper looks at the context and approach undertaken by the firm in addressing this issue, and the future implications in the context of both the firm's existing approach and the wider labor market and business environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the global context and drivers for the firm's gender policy development, the stakeholders/sponsors, primary initiatives, approach to measurement and evaluation and progress to date. It specifically examines a number of examples of activities undertaken in this particular UK firm.

Research limitations/implications

This case study examines the issue of gender equality at director and partnership level in a limited liability partnership environment.

Practical implications

The paper outlines practical lessons learned, and shares PwC's global research into how organizations can address the leaking pipeline of future female leadership.

Originality/value

PricewaterhouseCoopers' strategic approach to developing and advancing women in its firm has been frequently recognized in the UK by Opportunity Now, a membership organization for employers who are committed to creating an inclusive workplace for women, and Aurora – Where Women Want to Work, a service for women to research and compare organizations. It has also been recognized in the USA by the Catalyst research and advisory organization, which aims to build inclusive environments and expand opportunities for women, for its innovative, engaging and results driven approach. This paper provides practical insights and examples on the development and implementation of activities to address and advance gender diversity issues.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

G. Balaji

The purpose of this paper is to advocate an approach to leadership development to support the increasing trend of India‐based executives of multinational companies' (MNC…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advocate an approach to leadership development to support the increasing trend of India‐based executives of multinational companies' (MNC) subsidiaries taking on global roles.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper defines distinctive competencies and recommends the alignment of individual development to the organization's evolution.

Findings

This approach enables leadership development efforts in MNC subsidiaries to focus on building a pipeline of leadership talent for the global organization.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that cultural intelligence, result orientation and thought leadership – the distinctive competencies required for a global career – can be built effectively on job opportunities that India‐based MNC subsidiaries provide.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Beth Fisher‐Yoshida and Kathy Geller

As consultants working with multinational organizations predominantly in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, the authors frequently find themselves working with clients to

Abstract

Purpose

As consultants working with multinational organizations predominantly in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, the authors frequently find themselves working with clients to create strategies for building their talent pipeline and developing leaders at multiple managerial levels. The purpose of this article is to introduce a model and approach for developing transnational leaders that will serve as a basis for learning design going forward.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors introduce the reader to five paradoxes: presenting a continuum for each dilemma; listing the key aspects of the dilemma; describing a situation in which this particular paradox has manifested itself; and posing a provocative question to stimulate thinking and dialogue to address the paradox.

Findings

The five paradoxes leaders and managers in the twenty‐first century need to consider to effectively manage for organization success are the: paradox of knowing (self and other); paradox of focus (individual and communal); paradox of communication (direct and indirect); paradox of action (doing and being); and the paradox of response (time focus: short and long‐term).

Practical implications

Leading transnationally is a continuing dilemma to be considered and managed. It requires a willingness to understand the system in which one is operating and requires adaptability and flexibility in response.

Originality/value

Previous leadership development efforts have been primarily designed to offer competency based skills and tools. The authors instead propose that transnational leadership development needs to focus on paradox management, which will develop abilities to manage these dilemmas.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2019

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Maintaining a quality leadership pipeline is a concern for organizations. Traditionally, high potential employees were identified based on proven in-role experience. Identifying recognizable potential leadership traits and qualities means “new grad” programs can be set up, recruiting final year university students and then investing in their training and development before fast-tracking them to management positions. This article investigates one such program, looking at its creation and operation, and highlighting potential challenges.

Originality

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

James K. Stoller, Cheryl Barker and Kathleen FitzSimons

Because leadership competencies differ from the clinical and scientific competencies that make physicians successful in their clinical and scientific roles, leadership

Abstract

Purpose

Because leadership competencies differ from the clinical and scientific competencies that make physicians successful in their clinical and scientific roles, leadership development programs are now receiving attention.

Design/methodology/approach

As one component of the leadership development program at the Cleveland Clinic, the Physician-Leader On-Boarding Program offers newly appointed chairs a structured interaction with executive coaches with the goal of increasing self-awareness and, secondarily, developing a personal leadership development plan. New leaders review their inventory of healthcare leadership competencies and receive expert guidance regarding their ratings on a 360o feedback assessment and a self-rated psychometric instrument. The final activity of the two- to three-month program is the new leader's presenting and discussing a personal leadership development plan with the coaches.

Findings

Between December 2006 and June 2010, 25 new Cleveland Clinic department or institute chairs participated in the program, of whom 22 were invited to participate and 14 responded to a survey regarding their experience of the program. Respondents rated the program highly 4.92 out of maximum 5 on “I would recommend the program to my colleagues,” and also suggested that expectations could be better clarified, that the scope of on-boarding should be broader, and that longitudinal coaching should be offered.

Originality/value

The results generally support the value of an on-boarding program for new physician-leaders while identifying future opportunities. The aforementioned suggestions regarding broader scope, clear expectations and follow-up are discussed as opportunities to strengthen the on-boarding experience, and to identify areas that may need to be reinforced.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Case study
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Rozhan Bin Othman and Wardah Azimah Sumardi

Human resource management and leadership development.

Abstract

Subject area

Human resource management and leadership development.

Study level/applicability

MBA course on Human Resource Management.

Case overview

This case present the talent management practice at Steelcase. It highlights the approach taken by the company in managing its high performers. The approach taken by Steelcase links leadership development with performance management and succession planning. It also describes the distinct characteristics that make the approach taken by Steelcase different from other companies that implement talent management. This case presents policy options that companies can consider in developing a talent management program.

Expected learning outcomes

Understand and describe the interconnection between various talent development activities. Compare and assess policy options in developing talent management programs. Analyze how Steelcase nurture a high performance culture among its employees. Describe the leadership behaviors Steelcase is seeking to develop among its leaders.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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