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1 – 10 of over 100000
Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Francis J. Yammarino, Minyoung Cheong, Jayoung Kim and Chou-Yu Tsai

For many of the current leadership theories, models, and approaches, the answer to the question posed in the title, “Is leadership more than ‘I like my boss’?,” is “no,”…

Abstract

For many of the current leadership theories, models, and approaches, the answer to the question posed in the title, “Is leadership more than ‘I like my boss’?,” is “no,” as there appears to be a hierarchy of leadership concepts with Liking of the leader as the primary dimension or general factor foundation. There are then secondary dimensions or specific sub-factors of liking of Relationship Leadership and Task Leadership; and subsequently, tertiary dimensions or actual sub-sub-factors that comprise the numerous leadership views as well as their operationalizations (e.g., via surveys). There are, however, some leadership views that go beyond simply liking of the leader and liking of relationship leadership and task leadership. For these, which involve explicit levels of analysis formulations, often beyond the leader, or are multi-level in nature, the answer to the title question is “yes.” We clarify and discuss these various “no” and “yes” leadership views and implications of our work for future research and personnel and human resources management practice.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Håkan Nordin, Kristine Rørtveit, Gro Ellen Mathisen, Inge Joa, Jan Olav Johannessen, Torleif Ruud and Miriam Hartveit

The purpose of this study was to explore and interpret how frontline leaders define, experience and rationalise their approaches to the successful implementation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore and interpret how frontline leaders define, experience and rationalise their approaches to the successful implementation of clinical guidelines in mental health care.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing an interpretative phenomenological design, the authors conducted and analysed individual interviews of frontline leaders at 14 psychiatric clinics involved in a national study of implementing evidence-based clinical guidelines in mental health.

Findings

The authors found a broad spectrum of attitudes and attributes, as well as a wide repertoire of strategies for frontline implementation leadership. Three main approaches were revealed, comprising “Curious and welcoming”, “Integrity and setting standards” and “Caring and collegial”.

Research limitations/implications

The study present what experienced frontline leaders emphasise to enable implementation of guidelines, not empirical pieces of evidences for what they in fact do or if these actions lead to implementation. The generalisability to other settings is unknown. Another sample profile, context or organisational level may have impacted the result. The concreteness of the frontline leaders’ considerations, approaches and actions gives important knowledge about frontline leaders leadership across traditional leadership theories.

Originality/value

Existing leadership theories describe different leadership styles, while this study reveals the need for a wide range of approaches to balance the many needs and demands. The complexity of leadership approaches this study found is in line with implementation theories; thus, the present study incorporates implementation science into the leadership literature.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Nelda Spinks and Barron Wells

Leadership is the heart and soul of an organization. What is reallymanaged in an organization is peoplel Leadership is the ability toinspire people to work together as a…

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Abstract

Leadership is the heart and soul of an organization. What is really managed in an organization is peoplel Leadership is the ability to inspire people to work together as a team to achieve common objectives. Explores several approaches to leadership, including the trait approach, the style approach, the effectiveness versus efficiency approach, the contingency approach, the power approach, the function approach, the competence approach, and the TQM approach. In addition, looks at the role of leadership in behaviour and attitude modification and the different leadership tasks of upper‐level, middle‐level, and lower‐level leaders.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David Weiss and Vince Molinaro

Leaders' capacity has become mission‐critical in many organizations today. However, this business challenge is a struggle for many. Part of the reason is that current

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Abstract

Purpose

Leaders' capacity has become mission‐critical in many organizations today. However, this business challenge is a struggle for many. Part of the reason is that current approaches to building leadership capacity are failing to hit the mark, and many senior leaders have little confidence in their organization's leadership development programs. This article aims to examine how organizations can close the leadership gap in their organizations by implementing an integrated approach to leadership development.

Design/methodology/approach

The evolution of leadership development is discussed and a framework is presented to examine traditional approaches and consider their limitations.

Findings

The integrated‐solution approach to leadership development represents a more strategic, synergistic and sustainable way for organizations to build the leadership capacity they require to gain competitive advantage. The integrated solution is intense. It requires serious commitment on the part of organizations, their senior leaders and from HR. The process also is more complex. In the long‐term though, the integrated‐solution approach delivers greater value to organizations and ensures that their investment in leadership development is optimized.

Originality/value

The article presents practical and proven strategies to overcome the leadership gap in organizations today

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Daryl Mahon

Practitioners, organisations and policy makers in health and social care settings are increasingly recognising the need for trauma-informed approaches in organisational…

Abstract

Purpose

Practitioners, organisations and policy makers in health and social care settings are increasingly recognising the need for trauma-informed approaches in organisational settings, with morbidity and financial burdens a growing concern over the past few years. Servant leadership has a unique focus on emotional healing, service to others as the first priority, in addition to the growth, well-being and personal and professional development of key stakeholders. This paper aims to discuss Trauma Informed Servant Leadership (TISL).

Design/methodology/approach

A targeted review of the servant leadership and trauma-informed care literature was conducted. Relevant studies, including systematic review and meta-analysis, were sourced, with the resulting interpretation informing the conceptual model.

Findings

Although there are general guidelines regarding how to go about instituting trauma-informed approaches, with calls for organisational leadership to adapt the often cited six trauma-informed principles, to date there has not been a leadership approach elucidated which takes as its starting point and core feature to be trauma informed. At the same time, there is a paucity of research elucidating trauma outcomes for service users or employees in the literature when a trauma-informed approach is used. However, there is a large body of evidence indicating that servant leadership has many of the outcomes at the employee level that trauma-informed approaches are attempting to attain. Thus, the author builds on a previous conceptual paper in which a model of servant leadership and servant leadership supervision are proposed to mitigate against compassion fatigue and secondary trauma in the health and social care sector. The author extends that research to this paper by recasting servant leadership as a trauma-informed model of leadership that naturally operationalises trauma-informed principles.

Research limitations/implications

A lack of primary data limits the extent to which conclusions can be drawn on the effectiveness of this conceptual model. However, the model is based on robust research across the differential components used; therefore, it can act as a framework for future empirical research designs to be studies at the organisational level. Both the servant leadership and trauma-informed literatures have been extended with the addition of this model.

Practical implications

TISL can complement the trauma-informed approach and may also be viable as an alternative to trauma-informed approaches. This paper offers guidelines to practitioners and organisations in health and social care on how to operationalise important trauma-informed principles through leadership.

Social implications

This conceptual model may help reduce the burden of trauma and re-traumatisation encountered by practitioners and service users in health and social care settings, impacting on morbidity.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is a novel approach, the first of its kind.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Mary Lynn Boscardin and Katharine G. Shepherd

The intent of this article is to broaden one’s understanding of program evaluation methods that are responsive to disability and take into account various approaches to…

Abstract

Purpose

The intent of this article is to broaden one’s understanding of program evaluation methods that are responsive to disability and take into account various approaches to leadership within a special education context. Program evaluations for special education have often been relegated to compliance reviews and results-driven accountability measures. By promoting approaches to leadership that embrace responsive evaluation approaches and are inclusive of stakeholders from often disenfranchised groups, findings may emerge that otherwise might not be visible with traditional approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of the evaluation literature from leading journals, books and edited volumes is used to capture salient concepts necessary for understanding the degree to which evaluation and approaches respond to disability and culture. Additionally, the literature on leadership approaches is summarized and presented for the purpose of demonstrating how situational and transitional approaches to leadership may enhance the selection and use of evaluation approaches that are inclusive of and responsive to disability and culture.

Findings

From this analysis emerged four over-arching approaches to evaluation, each varying in degree of responsiveness to disability and culture. Further, when examining how evaluation interfaces with leadership, some approaches were found to be better aligned with particular evaluation processes and differed in responsiveness to disability and culture.

Research limitations/implications

To date, little research has been conducted on the interface between leadership and evaluation approaches or on the degree to which leaders' implementation of responsive evaluation approaches results in improved outcomes for students with disabilities and those from underrepresented backgrounds. This article provides a conceptual framework for future research examining the degree to which one’s assumptions about the interface between leadership and responsive evaluation approaches can be demonstrated empirically.

Practical implications

Four recommendations are provided for leaders: the need to employ multiple evaluation methods that align their purposes, questions and methods; the need to recognize the possibilities and limits of evaluation approaches in light of their responsiveness to disability and culture; the utility of situational and transitional approaches to leadership in the evaluation process; and the critical importance of including stakeholders from diverse backgrounds in the evaluation process.

Originality/value

Varied approaches to evaluation in educational settings have been extensively studied and discussed. However, few articles have examined the responsiveness of evaluations to the unique conditions that disability and cultural differences represent. The contribution of this article offers a situated synthesis of approaches to evaluation, specifically contextualized within a leadership framework, to better understand how evaluation approaches impact those with disabilities and cultural differences and the inclusion of broad groups of stakeholders. As such, this article lays the foundation for a comparative international conversation exploring how evaluation and leadership approaches responsively interface with disability and culture through inclusion and enfranchisement of stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 58 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Kenneth D. Mackenzie and F. Barry Barnes

The purpose of this article is to report on the underlying consensus in the major leadership approaches. This led to an assessment of the comprehensiveness of 11 leadership

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to report on the underlying consensus in the major leadership approaches. This led to an assessment of the comprehensiveness of 11 leadership approaches and the role of place in achieving it.

Design/methodology/approach

Overall, 11 leadership approaches are analyzed and coded according to their emphasis and purpose and their organizational place (organizational content/context and the follower content/context).

Findings

A total of eight consensus items are found which range from “leadership is a good thing and more of its is better” to “leadership is a type of holonomic process”. In addition, ten of the 11 leadership approaches lack comprehensiveness, and that this lack is possibly the reason for their popularity.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not include all possible leadership approaches. The analysis and coding of those selected leave room for different interpretations and possibly different conclusions.

Practical limitations

The inability of most leadership approaches to incorporate actual content of the work and the context of the group or organizations limits their usefulness to actually improve leadership. Theorists need to consider and incorporate place in their formulations.

Originality/value

This paper uses the philosophical concept of place to analyze leadership approaches. This paper also introduces the LAMPE approach to organizational leadership because it points the way to having more comprehensive leadership approach.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2022

David Earl Adams

Medical errors have become the third leading cause of death in the USA. Two million deaths from preventable medical errors will occur annually worldwide each year. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

Medical errors have become the third leading cause of death in the USA. Two million deaths from preventable medical errors will occur annually worldwide each year. The purpose of this paper is to find themes from the literature relating leadership styles – leadership approaches in practice – with success in reducing medical errors and patient safety.

Design/methodology/approach

This review analyzed primary and secondary sources based on a search for the terms leadership OR leadership style AND medical errors OR patient safety using five high-quality health-care-specific databases: Healthcare Administration Database from Proquest, LLC, Emerald Insight from Emerald Publishing Limited, ScienceDirect from Elsevier, Ovid from Ovid Technologies and MEDLINE with Full-Text from Elton B. Stevens Company. After narrowing, the review considered 21 sources that met the criteria.

Findings

The review found three leadership approaches and four leadership actions connected to successfully reducing medical errors and improving patient safety. Transformational, authentic and shared leadership produced successful outcomes. The review also found four leadership actions – regular checks on the front line and promoting teamwork, psychological safety and open communication – associated with successful outcomes. The review concluded that leadership appeared to be the preeminent factor in reducing medical errors and improving patient safety. It also found that positive leadership approaches, regardless of the safety intervention, led to improving results and outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This review was limited in three ways. First, the review only included sources from the USA, the UK, Canada and Australia. While those countries have similar public-private health-care systems and similar socioeconomics, the problem of medical errors is global (Rodziewicz and Hipskind, 2019). Other leadership approaches or actions may have correlated to reducing medical errors by broadening the geographic selection parameters. Future research could remove geographic restrictions for selection. Second, the author has a bias toward leadership as distinctive from management. There may be additional insights gleaned from expanding the search terms to include management concepts. Third, the author is a management consultant to organizations seeking to improve health-care safety. The author’s bias against limited action as opposed to strategic leadership interventions is profound and significant. This bias may generalize the problem more than necessary.

Practical implications

There are three direct practical implications from this review. The limitations of this review bound these implications. First, organizations might assess strategic and operational leaders to determine their competencies for positive leadership. Second, organizations just beginning to frame or reframe a safety strategy can perhaps combine safety and leadership interventions for better outcomes. Third, organizations could screen applicants to assess team membership and team leadership orientation and competencies.

Originality/value

This review is valuable to practitioners who are interested in conceptual relationships between leadership approaches, safety culture and reducing medical errors. The originality of this research is limited to that of any literature review. It summarizes the main themes in the selected literature. The review provides a basis for future considerations centered on dual organizational interventions for leadership and safety.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Khaliq Ahmad and O.K. Ogunsola

The main purpose of the present paper is to document some Islamic leadership principles of management. The paper equally examines the leadership function as adopted by…

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Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of the present paper is to document some Islamic leadership principles of management. The paper equally examines the leadership function as adopted by academic administrators within the International Islamic University, Malaysia vis‐à‐vis Islamic principles of management. The whole process is an attempt to conduct an empirical study of the important role of excellent leadership from an Islamic perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of revealed sources of knowledge (the Quran and Sunnah) and literature reviews were used to document Islamic leadership principles. Then, a questionnaire‐based survey was used to examine the Islamic leadership principles, approaches, and sources of leadership principles adopted in the university. Use of the scale of statistical measurement was done to test the significance and reliability level.

Findings

It was found that academic administrators were imbued with Islamic leadership principles. The research also showed that servant‐leadership approach is preferably used in conjunction with alternative transactional and transformational styles, while the revealed sources of knowledge (Quran and Sunnah) were given the highest priority as sources of developing leadership principles.

Research limitations/implications

Islamic management is a diverse field. This study is, however, limited to Islamic leadership principles in an organization. Perhaps, this study will be little known to adherents of the conventional management principles, which may stimulate further thinking and debate on the crossing point between Islam and the management of an organization.

Originality/value

It is aimed at providing some knowledge of Islamic philosophy and practice in order to help today's employers and employees carry on everyday activities imbued with Islamic values and cultures.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 100000