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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Jakob Wirth, Christian Maier, Sven Laumer and Tim Weitzel

“Smart devices think you're “too lazy” to opt out of privacy defaults” was the headline of a recent news report indicating that individuals might be too lazy to stop…

Abstract

Purpose

“Smart devices think you're “too lazy” to opt out of privacy defaults” was the headline of a recent news report indicating that individuals might be too lazy to stop disclosing their private information and therefore to protect their information privacy. In current privacy research, privacy concerns and self-disclosure are central constructs regarding protecting privacy. One might assume that being concerned about protecting privacy would lead individuals to disclose less personal information. However, past research has shown that individuals continue to disclose personal information despite high privacy concerns, which is commonly referred to as the privacy paradox. This study introduces laziness as a personality trait in the privacy context, asking to what degree individual laziness influences privacy issues.

Design/methodology/approach

After conceptualizing, defining and operationalizing laziness, the authors analyzed information collected in a longitudinal empirical study and evaluated the results through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings show that the privacy paradox holds true, yet the level of laziness influences it. In particular, the privacy paradox applies to very lazy individuals but not to less lazy individuals.

Research limitations/implications

With these results one can better explain the privacy paradox and self-disclosure behavior.

Practical implications

The state might want to introduce laws that not only bring organizations to handle information in a private manner but also make it as easy as possible for individuals to protect their privacy.

Originality/value

Based on a literature review, a clear research gap has been identified, filled by this research study.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2013

Mindy K. Shoss, Allison H. Maurer and Elizabeth A. Rupprecht

The current chapter presents a qualitative analysis of the emotional and substantive content of 300 vents found on public job-related venting web sites. We leverage the…

Abstract

The current chapter presents a qualitative analysis of the emotional and substantive content of 300 vents found on public job-related venting web sites. We leverage the related yet distinct literatures on venting, complaining, expressive writing, and computer-mediated communication to gain insight into how employees understand, communicate, and try to manage emotional experiences at work through these types of outlets. We found that employees vent about mistreatment by others, others’ incompetence or laziness, inequity, under-stimulation, and broader economic trends. In doing so, they often express anger in extreme forms involving profanity, personal attacks, and desires for retribution.

Details

Individual Sources, Dynamics, and Expressions of Emotion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-889-1

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Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2012

Carol Camp Yeakey

Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts is a volume long overdue. With the impact of the Great Recession of 2009 and its…

Abstract

Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts is a volume long overdue. With the impact of the Great Recession of 2009 and its resultant impacts on a global scale, we are witnessing crises and institutional collapse on a major scale. Systemic problems go well beyond institutional crises brought on by collapsed economies and corporate excesses, but involve and make worse issues of inequality, racism, sexism, inadequate housing and health care, un/employment, poverty, underachievement, inadequate schooling and crime and justice. Periodically, our social science research and public policies have tended to assume that our social problems and social ills could be resolved. However with growing income inequality, there is notable tension developing between the ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’. During periods of tight economies, contemporary thinking is reminiscent of Social Darwinism, that social ills and social problems can be traced to laziness, lack of ambition and deficiencies among the lower social classes. The shifting nature of work, global economic competition and technological advance has and will continue to have marked influence on jobs, income and social mobility in both developed and developing countries. The purpose of Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts is to raise questions and provide its readers with well-rounded and expansive frames of analysis to question, to view and to improve upon the societies in which they live. Our purpose will be accomplished if this volume helps its readers to begin their own process of questioning and addressing the substantive issues involved.

Details

Living on the Boundaries: Urban Marginality in National and International Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-032-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Ahmed Abdelhalim Al-Shiyab and Raed Ismail Ababneh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the consequences of workplace violence against healthcare staff in Jordanian public hospitals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the consequences of workplace violence against healthcare staff in Jordanian public hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenient sample included 334 physicians and nurses employed in eight different public hospitals, different departments and different working shifts were surveyed by filling the designed questionnaire.

Findings

The findings indicated workplace violence had a clear moderate impact on the respondents’ interaction with patients, performing work responsibilities, ability of making decisions, and professional career. The most frequent workplace violence consequences were damaging staff’s personality and prestige, increasing laziness and unwillingness to serve patients. Workplace violence consequences also included aggressive behavior, fear while dealing with patients, increase job insecurity, and lack of professional responsibility. In addition, demographic variables such as gender, education, job title, working shift, and income showed statistical significant differences in the attitudes of participants toward the consequences of workplace violence.

Practical implications

This study highlighted the necessity of healthcare policy makers and hospital administrators to establish violence free and safe working environments in order to retain qualified healthcare staff that in turn improves the health services quality.

Originality/value

There is a lack of research and documentation on violence in the healthcare settings in developing countries. This study is one of the first to examine the consequences of workplace violence that affect public physicians and nurses.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

When I was asked by the editor of Kybernetes to contribute to the issue dedicated to Professor Stafford Beer's achievements in the realm of cybernetics and systems, my…

Abstract

When I was asked by the editor of Kybernetes to contribute to the issue dedicated to Professor Stafford Beer's achievements in the realm of cybernetics and systems, my first reaction was to decline this very tempting invitation, because one would require a complete issue of the journal to describe his work and the impact of his ideas. On reflection, however, I opted for another, viz. to write a succinct version which may appeal to readers because of its brevity, while relieving me of having to justify my inadequacy and the natural laziness afflicting me in my old age…

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1962

I.C. Williams

Will it be the language laboratory that finally helps the English overcome their shyness about speaking foreign languages? Or is our linguistic laziness too deeply ingrained?

Abstract

Will it be the language laboratory that finally helps the English overcome their shyness about speaking foreign languages? Or is our linguistic laziness too deeply ingrained?

Details

Education + Training, vol. 4 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1981

Bill Walsh

There are about as many definitions of absenteeism as there are suggested causes. What attracts interest is the sort of non‐attendance which tends to be associated with…

Abstract

There are about as many definitions of absenteeism as there are suggested causes. What attracts interest is the sort of non‐attendance which tends to be associated with malpractice or anti‐social behaviour of some kind — that which derives from the absence of a work ethic. This includes malingering, laziness, and couldn't care less attitudes — what we might define as unjustified absence.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Carolyn M. Axtell, Karin S. Moser and Janet McGoldrick

Status is a central aspect of teamwork relationships and successful collaboration in teams, both online and offline. Status group membership and status perception shape…

Abstract

Purpose

Status is a central aspect of teamwork relationships and successful collaboration in teams, both online and offline. Status group membership and status perception shape behavioural expectations and norm perceptions of what is appropriate, but despite their importance have been neglected in previous research. Status effects are of special interest in online collaboration, e.g. via email, where no immediate feedback or non-verbal/paraverbal communication and direct observation is possible. The purpose of this study is to address this gap in research.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental scenario study with two different professional status groups (lecturers and students) tested status effects on causal attributions, intergroup bias and emotional and collaborative responses to perceived norm violations in emails.

Findings

Results overall showed three key findings: a “black-sheep-effect” with harsher negative attributions for same status members, more aggression and less cooperation towards lower status senders and stronger (negative) emotional reactions towards high status senders.

Originality/value

The findings are important for managing professional online communication because negative personal attributions, strong emotions and aggressive behaviours can increase team conflict, lead to mistakes and generally undermine performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Peter Cohen

From a paper given at the Tweelanden conferentie Cannabisteelt in de Lage Landen, at the University of Ghent, on 3‐4 December 2007, the author explores the culture of the…

Abstract

From a paper given at the Tweelanden conferentie Cannabisteelt in de Lage Landen, at the University of Ghent, on 3‐4 December 2007, the author explores the culture of the ban on cannabis and defines its goals.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Ernest Raiklin

The monograph argues that American racism has two colours (whiteand black), not one; and that each racism dresses itself not in oneclothing, but in four: (1) “Minimal”…

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Abstract

The monograph argues that American racism has two colours (white and black), not one; and that each racism dresses itself not in one clothing, but in four: (1) “Minimal” negative, when one race considers another race inferior to itself in degree, but not in nature; (2) “Maximal” negative, when one race regards another as inherently inferior; (3) “Minimal” positive, when one race elevates another race to a superior status in degree, but not in nature; and (4) “Maximal” positive, when one race believes that the other race is genetically superior. The monograph maintains that the needs of capitalism created black slavery; that black slavery produced white racism as a justification for black slavery; and that black racism is a backlash of white racism. The monograph concludes that the abolition of black slavery and the civil rights movement destroyed the social and political ground for white and black racism, while the modern development of capitalism is demolishing their economic and intellectual ground.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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