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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Lawrence P. Huggins

While mention of his work is occasionally referred to in journals, readings, production and operations management and total quality management textbooks, there does not…

Abstract

While mention of his work is occasionally referred to in journals, readings, production and operations management and total quality management textbooks, there does not seem to be as much notoriety given to the contributions of Armand V. Feigenbaum as has been given the efforts of others to improvements in quality thinking and techniques in this and other countries. This paper explores some of his contributions, especially those which derive from his managerial years with the General Electric Company and his influence on the work of others of the “founders” of the total quality management movement.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Muhammad Bilal Farooq and Charl de Villiers

The purpose of this paper is to examine the competition between accounting sustainability assurance providers (ASAPs) and non-accounting sustainability assurance providers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the competition between accounting sustainability assurance providers (ASAPs) and non-accounting sustainability assurance providers (NASAPs), and how this competition influences the institutionalization of the evolving field of sustainability assurance.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretivist research methodology, guided by an institutional work perspective, is used to analyze interviews with 15 SAPs and 35 sustainability reporting managers (SRMs) in Australia and New Zealand.

Findings

ASAPs prefer to use International Standard on Assurance Engagements 3000 (ISAE3000), because it is well recognized in the profession, adheres to ASAPs’ regulatory requirements, and mirrors their financial audit methodologies. This preference influences ASAPs’ institutional work as they compete against NASAPs and how they institutionalize sustainability assurance. ASAPs’ institutional works include presenting sustainability assurance as similar to a financial audit, arguing in support of a single provider for financial audits and sustainability assurance, and undermining NASAPs and their preferred sustainability assurance standard, AA1000 Assurance Standard (AA1000AS), by appealing to senior management. In comparison, NASAPs promote AA1000AS as a specialist standard among SRMs, emphasizing the standard’s sustainability enhancing qualities and its flexibility, while discrediting ASAPs and ISAE3000 as out of touch with sustainability objectives.

Research limitations/implications

A new conceptual model is constructed that can be used in institutional work research.

Practical implications

The accounting profession is encouraged to consider more flexible, innovative methods in new assurance markets. This involves using new assurance standards as well as developing specialist standards for new forms of assurance. Regulation over sustainability assurance could be helpful, but regulators should be careful not to stifle competition in this evolving field.

Originality/value

This paper examines how competition between ASAPs and NASAPs influences the institutionalization of sustainability assurance. The paper offers a new model for the analysis of institutional work, which could be used by researchers, new insights into the emerging field of sustainability assurance, as well as a figure and discussion that clarifies the broader implications of the findings.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2017

Giada Di Stefano, Andrew A. King and Gianmario Verona

A long tradition in social science research emphasizes the potential for knowledge to flow among firms colocated in dense areas. Scholars have suggested numerous modes for…

Abstract

A long tradition in social science research emphasizes the potential for knowledge to flow among firms colocated in dense areas. Scholars have suggested numerous modes for these flows, including the voluntary transfer of private knowledge from one firm to another. Why would the holder of valuable private knowledge willingly transfer it to a potential and closely proximate competitor? In this paper, we argue that geographic concentration has an effect on the expected compliance with norms governing the use of transferred knowledge. The increased expected compliance favors trust and initiates a process of reciprocal exchange. To test our theory, we use a scenario-based field experiment in gourmet cuisine, an industry in which property rights do not effectively protect knowledge and geographic concentration is common. Our results confirm our conjecture by showing that the expectation that a potential colocated firm will abide by norms mediates the relationship between geographic concentration and the willingness to transfer private knowledge.

Details

Geography, Location, and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-276-3

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Catherine Elliott, Janet Mantler and Joie Huggins

Women are underrepresented in most university entrepreneurship education (EE) programmes and less likely than men to pursue business venturing as a career. One reason may…

Abstract

Purpose

Women are underrepresented in most university entrepreneurship education (EE) programmes and less likely than men to pursue business venturing as a career. One reason may be the “entrepreneurial identity gap”, whereby female students do not see themselves as successful entrepreneurs. This paper aims to explore the nature of this identity gap and its relationship to entrepreneurial intent and entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of contemporary, gender-inclusive entrepreneurial attributes was developed using entrepreneurial subject matter experts and tested with 591 university students to explore the nature of the gendered entrepreneurial identity gap.

Findings

While masculine stereotypes persist and the entrepreneurial identity gap is larger for female students, results suggest that a more gender-inclusive vocabulary of entrepreneurship is emerging among the student population and an androgynous perception of the idealized entrepreneur. Entrepreneurship education had a positive influence on entrepreneurial intent.

Research limitations/implications

Study findings advance the conversation about entrepreneurial identity, the nature of the gendered identity gap and the role of education in closing that gap. The questionnaire and set of gender-inclusive attributes should continue to be tested beyond student samples.

Practical implications

Based on this study, entrepreneurship education could benefit from more gender-inclusive instructional practices and vocabulary and a broadened definition of what it means to be entrepreneurial. More students – both men and women – will see themselves as entrepreneurs and be inspired to participate in the innovation economy.

Originality/value

This study takes a novel approach to the study of entrepreneurial identity, developing a new set of attributes and contemporary vocabulary around business venturing.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Book part
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Julie M. Birkholz and Robin Shields

The goal of this chapter is to introduce the network paradigm for analyzing relational phenomena and organizing knowledge in higher education research. This introduction…

Abstract

The goal of this chapter is to introduce the network paradigm for analyzing relational phenomena and organizing knowledge in higher education research. This introduction is presented by example: it analyzes knowledge on inter-organizational relationships of higher education institutions. The formation, maintenance, and impact of relationships are implicitly relational, although they have largely been understood as a consequence of institutional practices. Through the network paradigm, we show that focusing on relations we can develop new and more precise models to understand the antecedents, consequences, and characteristics of these networks.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-222-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

James H. Dulebohn and Hsiu‐Lang Chen

State and local public pension plans cover a significant number of workers and represent a major component of the nation's retirement system. This study examined the…

Abstract

State and local public pension plans cover a significant number of workers and represent a major component of the nation's retirement system. This study examined the size‐administrative cost relationship of public pension plans to ascertain whether cost savings can be realized by increasing pension plan size. The results indicated that while the consolidation of smaller plans will generate administrative cost savings, the consolidation of larger plans will generate savings only up to an optimal membership size at which point cost savings will end. In addition, optimal size was found to differ for active and beneficiary members indicating that membership composition needs to be considered when assessing the potential for cost savings.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Saša Batistic and Alex Tymon

Drawing on the overarching framework of social capital theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically examine networking behaviour and employability…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the overarching framework of social capital theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically examine networking behaviour and employability within the higher education context.

Design/methodology/approach

In a sample of 376 full-time business students the authors measured perceived employability, networking behaviour, access to information and resources and job-search learning goal orientation (JSLGO).

Findings

The authors found networking is related to increased internal and external perceived employability by boosting access to information and resources. The results also demonstrate that networking is positively related to access to information and resources for low and high JSLGO, the relationship being stronger for those with higher levels.

Research limitations/implications

The results provide an enriched view of individual networking behaviour by offering an indirect model of networking outcomes and to the graduate employability and social capital literatures.

Practical implications

The findings may provide focus for individuals concerned with enhancing their employability and those involved in supporting career guidance.

Originality/value

Obvious beneficiaries are students, for whom employment is a key concern, and universities who face increasing pressure to enhance graduate employability whilst resources to do so are diminishing. To this end the authors highlight activities that may develop networking behaviours and JSLGO.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2015

Abstract

Details

University Partnerships for Community and School System Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-132-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Susan Batty

The purpose of this paper is to explore two of the paradoxes arising from different views about resource limits and sustainable development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore two of the paradoxes arising from different views about resource limits and sustainable development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies the implications for property rights and public participation in environmental decisions. The first paradox concerns the adoption of policies of exclusion and inclusion through property rights and collective action; the second looks at the new role of the city where concentration of activities, once the cause of environmental degradation is now seen as the route to sustainable development.

Findings

Although private property is capable of securing exclusion and resource protection – it is neither necessary nor sufficient for sustainable development. Cooperation and appropriate institutions are essential; in other words a system of stable and binding rules that under some circumstances can be more effective when they are social and local than when they are national and legal. Urban renaissance principles of mixed uses and compact cities obscure traditional density relationships and point to the need for new forms of measurement to replace outdated residential density measures.

Originality/value

The paper addresses issues relevant to institutional design including private and collective property rights, and discusses appropriate measures for residential densities in relation to sustainable development policies.

Details

Property Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2020

Kyle A. Huggins, Darin W. White, Betsy Bugg Holloway and John D. Hansen

This study aims to examine how an organization’s Web-based marketing communication strategies drive feelings of customer gratitude and desired behavioral responses. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how an organization’s Web-based marketing communication strategies drive feelings of customer gratitude and desired behavioral responses. The study specifically examines how a key cultural characteristic, ethnic identity, works in conjunction with Web quality to influence customers’ gratitude perceptions, thereby driving increases in positive word of mouth, repeat purchase intentions and price tolerance.

Design/methodology/approach

A major soccer e-retailer based in the USA collected survey data for the study. The authors examined the direct and indirect effects of Web quality through conditional process analysis.

Findings

Study findings indicate that customers’ Web quality and ethnic identity perceptions significantly influence customer gratitude and performance outcomes. Study findings also demonstrate the central mediating role of gratitude on the main and interactive effects of Web quality and ethnic identity.

Practical implications

Study findings suggest that online strategies of cultural-adaptation should go beyond integration of native language to include all key dimensions of website quality, to drive consumer gratitude and ultimately favorable outcomes such as word of mouth, price tolerance and repurchase intentions.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates empirical support for the successful deployment of relationship marketing efforts that impact all three dimensions (affect, cognition and behavioral intention) of customer gratitude.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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