Search results

1 – 10 of 86
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Warwick Murray and Lawrence S. Lockshin

Problems with corks are a major issue in the wine industry. The key problem has been the lack of consumer acceptance of alternative closures. This research used an…

Abstract

Problems with corks are a major issue in the wine industry. The key problem has been the lack of consumer acceptance of alternative closures. This research used an interview and survey approach with 200 wine shoppers in Australia to determine: 1) consumer perceptions of cork problems; 2) acceptance of a synthetic cork with no information provided; and 3) acceptance of a synthetic cork after providing information concerning cork problems and solutions. Consumers who purchased more than one bottle of wine per week had the most problems with corks, but 75% of all consumers interviewed had experienced some problems in the last 12 months. The provision of information was key in gaining consumer acceptance of the synthetic corks. Measures of which attributes of the synthetic corks attracted consumers is also provided along with recommendations for introducing these closures into the marketplace.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2003

Dong‐Mo Koo

This study examines how various characteristics of the discount retail environment and the overall attitude towards a discount retail store, considered to be an abstract…

Downloads
6056

Abstract

This study examines how various characteristics of the discount retail environment and the overall attitude towards a discount retail store, considered to be an abstract and global image component, influence consumers’ satisfaction and how consumers’ satisfaction, in turn, affects store loyalty. The data, collected from a sample of 517 discount retail customers in Daegu, Korea, indicate that: (1) forming the overall attitude is more closely related to in‐store services: atmosphere, employee service, after sales service and merchandising, (2) store satisfaction is formed through perceived store atmosphere and value, (3) the overall attitude has strong influence on satisfaction and loyalty and its impact is much stronger on loyalty than on satisfaction, (4) store loyalty is directly affected by most significantly location, merchandising and after sale service in order, (5) satisfaction is not related to customers’ committed store revisiting behavior. The applications in management and implications for future research are discussed.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Ian Handley and Lawrence Lockshin

The growth of wine sales in the Pacific Rim is receiving a large amount of attention. This study was designed to look more deeply into the actual purchase behaviour of…

Abstract

The growth of wine sales in the Pacific Rim is receiving a large amount of attention. This study was designed to look more deeply into the actual purchase behaviour of middle class wine buyers in a selection of Singaporean supermarkets. Purchase behaviour was observed for 60 hours in a total of eight representative supermarkets. The findings show a smaller number of sales than would be expected, especially based on the size of the category displays. The types of wines, countries of origin, prices, browsing, and purchases are noted. The overall conclusion is of a wine market in its infancy with a need for education and further development before wine becomes a regular part of weekly shopping and consumption.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Lawrence S. Lockshin and W. Timothy Rhodus

This research compared wine quality evaluations by wine consumers and wine wholesalers for the same Chardonnay wine at three price levels and four different oak levels…

Abstract

This research compared wine quality evaluations by wine consumers and wine wholesalers for the same Chardonnay wine at three price levels and four different oak levels. Consumers judged wines mainly by price, regardless of the oak level. Wholesale sales people ignored the prices and judged the wines by the oak level. Wholesalers predicted that consumers would respond based on the wholeaslers' quality judgments, and were unable to accurately predict the consumers' responses. Better targeting of consumers and better training of the wholesale representatives is recommended.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Donald Cook and Lawrence Lockshin

Wine exports from Australia are expected to double within the next five years and much of this growth has been forecasted to occur in the traditionally non‐wine drinking…

Abstract

Wine exports from Australia are expected to double within the next five years and much of this growth has been forecasted to occur in the traditionally non‐wine drinking countries of the Pacific Rim. This paper, based on lengthy interviews with importers, agents, and buyers for various retail institutions in Thailand, uses a case study approach to argue that export strategies based on successful entry into the UK and US markets will be less efficient in the Pacific Rim. A detailed analysis of the market structure, including the types of wines and strategies of institutions from the top to the bottom end of the price spectrum is presented. The success of Australian producers entering the Thai market will be achieved only by changing the strategy they have used in the UK and US. A stronger focus on Australia must be made along with the use of fewer, but bigger agents and distributors. Marketing strategies for each type of retail institution are provided as well.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Downloads
3153

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Scans the top 400 management publications in the world to identify the most topical issues and latest concepts. These are presented in an easy‐to‐digest briefing of no more than 1,500 words.

Findings

What's the best way to market a small or medium sized enterprise (SME)? The seemingly obvious answer is that adopting a well‐researched, long‐term approach to meeting customers’ needs, would ensure continued growth and development. However, in this case, the obvious answer would be wrong. Market research indicates that entrepreneurial firms don't take the long‐term approach. Instead, their marketing strategies often rely on crisis management, gut feelings and actions designed to deal with immediate competitive pressures.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Michael Beverland and Lawrence S. Lockshin

The essence of entrepreneurship is “effectual action”. Researchers at the entrepreneurial/marketing interface suggest that small firms adapt marketing theory to their…

Downloads
3798

Abstract

The essence of entrepreneurship is “effectual action”. Researchers at the entrepreneurial/marketing interface suggest that small firms adapt marketing theory to their needs, undertaking a range of emergent actions in response to day‐to‐day events and problems, without recourse to formal planning or research. By way of contrast, brands require guided action, in order to build a sustainable position in the marketplace, while research also reveals that small specialist firms increase their chance of failure if they undertake a range of unguided actions that lead to niche drift. Based upon an in‐depth case study, identifies that SMEs do benefit from constant actions, but only if guided by a strong set of positioning values, which are diffused into an organisational culture, primarily via the actions of the leader.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Dale F. Duhan, Pamela L. Kiecker, Charles S. Areni and Cari Guerrero

The purpose of this study is to investigate how origin information for wine products influences retail sales. The growing variety of products and the generally singular…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate how origin information for wine products influences retail sales. The growing variety of products and the generally singular origin of wine products makes this market particularly sensitive to origin information. The origin of wine is often perceived as an indicator of quality and is used as the basis of decision making when purchasing wine products. This study empirically tests a portion of Johansson's framework for the use of origin information through both a market survey and a field experiment to determine the predictive value on market position for a group of wine products from the Texas region. The results of the survey and the field experiment were consistent and found that emphasizing the origin of Texas wine significantly influenced retail sales. These results also indicate that special displays and increased retail shelf space do not always have a positive effect on sales of the displayed products. Therefore, it is important for retail managers to first identify whether the image of the wine's origin is perceived positively or negatively before using origin information in store displays.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Oriol Jorge, Adria Pons, Josep Rius, Carla Vintró, Jordi Mateo and Jordi Vilaplana

Wine has been produced for thousands of years and nowadays we have seen a spread in the wine culture. E-commerce sales of wine have increased considerably and online…

Downloads
2034

Abstract

Purpose

Wine has been produced for thousands of years and nowadays we have seen a spread in the wine culture. E-commerce sales of wine have increased considerably and online customer's satisfaction is influenced by quality and price. This paper presents a case study of the company “QuieroVinos, S.L.”, an online wine shop founded in 2015 that sells Spanish wines in two main marketplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

With the final target of increasing the company profits it has been designed and developed an application to track the prices of competitors for a set of products. This information will be used to set the product prices in order to offer the products both competitively and profitably in each Marketplace. This application must check, by tacking into account information such as the product cost or the minimum product margin, if it is possible to decrease the price in order to reach the top cheapest position and as a consequence, increase the sales.

Findings

The application improved in a notorious way the company's results in terms of sales and shipping costs. It must be said that without the use of the presented application, performing the price comparison process within each one of the marketplaces would have taken a long time. Moreover, as prices change very frequently, the obtained information has a very limited time value, and the competitors prices should be analyzed daily in order to take accurate decisions regarding the company's price policy.

Originality/value

Although the application has been designed for the wine sector and the two named marketplace, it could be exported to other sectors. For that, it should be implemented new modules to collect information regarding the competitor's price of the products selling on each corresponding marketplace.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Rujirutana Mandhachitara and Larry Lockshin

This paper examines the Scotch whisky market in Thai department stores over a two‐year period and shows their importance to Thai retailing. The paper then finds that the…

Downloads
6215

Abstract

This paper examines the Scotch whisky market in Thai department stores over a two‐year period and shows their importance to Thai retailing. The paper then finds that the category behaves as both a fast moving consumer goods market and as a luxury market. Product movement is rapid when compared to other luxury good categories and there is some evidence of discounting. The data, derived from a sample of weekly sales through 25 department stores over two years, show differences in distribution, merchandising, and pricing strategy across different chains. The paper concludes by looking at the potential causes of profit differences across these chains.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of 86